King Arthur and His Knights [NOOK Book]

Overview

King Arthur was a legendary British leader of the late 5th and early 6th centuries, who, according to Medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Romano-Celtic Britain against Saxon invaders in the early 6th century. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians. The sparse historical background of Arthur is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, ...
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King Arthur and His Knights

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Overview

King Arthur was a legendary British leader of the late 5th and early 6th centuries, who, according to Medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Romano-Celtic Britain against Saxon invaders in the early 6th century. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians. The sparse historical background of Arthur is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas. Arthur's name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin.
The legendary Arthur developed as a figure of international interest largely through the popularity of Geoffrey of Monmouth's fanciful and imaginative 12th-century Historia Regum Britanniae (History of the Kings of Britain). Some Welsh and Breton tales and poems relating the story of Arthur date from earlier than this work; in these works, Arthur appears either as a great warrior defending Britain from human and supernatural enemies or as a magical figure of folklore, sometimes associated with the Welsh Otherworld, Annwn. How much of Geoffrey's Historia (completed in 1138) was adapted from such earlier sources, rather than invented by Geoffrey himself, is unknown.
Although the themes, events and characters of the Arthurian legend varied widely from text to text, and there is no one canonical version, Geoffrey's version of events often served as the starting point for later stories. Geoffrey depicted Arthur as a king of Britain who defeated the Saxons and established an empire over Britain, Ireland, Iceland, Norway and Gaul. Many elements and incidents that are now an integral part of the Arthurian story appear in Geoffrey's Historia, including Arthur's father Uther Pendragon, the wizard Merlin, Arthur's wife Guinevere, the sword Excalibur, Arthur's birth at Tintagel, his final battle against Mordred at Camlann and final rest in Avalon. The 12th-century French writer Chrétien de Troyes, who added Lancelot and the Holy Grail to the story, began the genre of Arthurian romance that became a significant strand of medieval literature. In these French stories, the narrative focus often shifts from King Arthur himself to other characters, such as various Knights of the Round Table. Arthurian literature thrived during the Middle Ages but waned in the centuries that followed until it experienced a major resurgence in the 19th century. In the 21st century, the legend lives on, not only in literature but also in adaptations for theatre, film, television, comics and other media.
The historical basis for the King Arthur legend has long been debated by scholars. The first datable mention of King Arthur is in a 9th century Latin text. One school of thought, citing entries in the Historia Brittonum (History of the Britons) and Annales Cambriae (Welsh Annals), sees Arthur as a genuine historical figure, a Romano-British leader who fought against the invading Anglo-Saxons sometime in the late 5th to early 6th century. The Historia Brittonum, a 9th-century Latin historical compilation attributed in some late manuscripts to a Welsh cleric called Nennius, lists twelve battles that Arthur fought. These culminate in the Battle of Mons Badonicus, or Mount Badon, where he is said to have single-handedly killed 960 men. Recent studies, however, question the reliability of the Historia Brittonum as a source for the history of this period.
The other text that seems to support the case for Arthur's historical existence is the 10th-century Annales Cambriae, which also link Arthur with the Battle of Mount Badon. The Annales date this battle to 516–518, and also mention the Battle of Camlann, in which Arthur and Medraut (Mordred) were both killed, dated to 537–539. These details have often been used to bolster confidence in the Historia's account and to confirm that Arthur really did fight at Mount Badon. Problems have been identified, however, with using this source to support the Historia Brittonum's account. The latest research shows that the Annales Cambriae was based on a chronicle begun in the late 8th century in Wales. Additionally, the complex textual history of the Annales Cambriae precludes any certainty that the Arthurian annals were added to it even that early. They were more likely added at some point in the 10th century and may never have existed in any earlier set of annals. The Mount Badon entry probably derived from the Historia Brittonum.
This lack of convincing early evidence is the reason many recent historians exclude Arthur from their accounts of post-Roman Britain. In the view of historian Thomas Charles-Edwards, "at this stage of the enquiry, one can only say that there may well have been an historical Arthur [but …] the historian can as yet say nothing of value about him". These modern admissions of ignorance are a relatively recent trend; earlier generations..
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012375773
  • Publisher: JC PUB NETWORKS
  • Publication date: 3/31/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Maude L. Radford
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

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(7)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2012

    GREAT!

    It was an excellent book even if it has as many spelling errors as my aunts first grade "science essay" (which has quite a few errors.)

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2011

    Get an Editor

    My eight- and 11-year-olds are seeing a disturbing trend in the free novels for Nook that they're reading. There is a blatant disregard for editing of spelling and punctuation. We have found such garbage in the text as "aJ^^Hut^^^vy." If you have a procedure for screening your text materials, it is not being followed. Please read all your e-books before you publish them or you will lose the interest of your educated readers, no matter their age.
    -A Parent with a BS in English Education

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2014

    Fv

    Cg

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2013

    Response to Alison

    Yes, I did. Her name ia in dispute, but it is commonly referred to as Morgan Le Fay or Morgan of the fairies.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2013

    Allison Caaway

    Did you know the sister of king arthur was morgan

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2012

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2012

    Too many knights

    But in the end it was worth it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    cool

    This book looks really cool, but is it really?????

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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