King Hedley II

( 1 )

Overview

King Hedley II is the 8th work in playwright August Wilson's 10-play cycle chronicling the history of the African-American experience in each decade of the 20th century. It's set in 1985 and tells the story of an ex-con in post-Reagan Pittsburgh trying to rebuild his life. Many critics have hailed the work as a haunting and challenging tragedy of Shakespearean proportions.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback
$11.10
BN.com price
(Save 25%)$14.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (29) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $7.08   
  • Used (19) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

King Hedley II is the 8th work in playwright August Wilson's 10-play cycle chronicling the history of the African-American experience in each decade of the 20th century. It's set in 1985 and tells the story of an ex-con in post-Reagan Pittsburgh trying to rebuild his life. Many critics have hailed the work as a haunting and challenging tragedy of Shakespearean proportions.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781559362603
  • Publisher: Theatre Communications Group
  • Publication date: 5/1/2005
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 498,926
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author


August Wilson is the most influential and successful African American playwright writing today. He is the two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Fences, The Piano Lesson, King Hedley II, Ma Rainy's Black Bottom, Joe Turner's Come and Gone, Seven Guitars, Two Trains Running, Jitney and Radio Golf. His plays have been produced all over the world.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2007

    you can't carry the world on your shoulders for too long because eventually it'll crush you

    After I read Seven Guitars, I could not wait to read King Hedley II, the sequel to the devastating play, which revealed Hedley as the killer. The events in this drama take place thirty-seven years (1985) after the events in the previous play (1948). This lapse of time sets the period in which Hedley's son, King Hedley the Second, has grown into a man and thus provides us with his history. King has been out of prison for four years he went to prison for killing a man for scarring his face. The first thing I noticed was that King felt the same way Floyd did: blocked (one can assume that August Wilson is trying to say that even all this time later black men are still being treated the same way)--his wife, Tonya, tells him she is deciding to have an abortion (this is because her daughter from a teenage pregnancy made the same mistakes she did and had a teenage pregnancy herself which is making her unsure how good a mother she will be) which makes King feel like he has no opinion, even in the life of his own child. His mother is living with him (she wants to make up for the period in his rearing when she was not there because she was singing with a jazz band and left him to be reared by her aunt, the landlady Louise). A mentioned-but-not-seen-onstage character from the previous play named Elmore makes an appearance to start back up his on-again off-again relationship with Ruby. He has also spent five years in prison for killing Leroy, a rival in the fight for Ruby's love and King's real father. Elmore is also a hustler: he gives King's friend, Mister, a gun that does not work all that well and in the process scams Mister out of all the money that he has on him at the moment. (Mister later gives this gun to Ruby, who won't use it until the final moments of the play.) Coming back also is Canewell, now called Stool Pigeon because Ruby named him this after he told the police Hedley killed Floyd Barton. King makes a living selling black market refrigerators. He hopes to one day sell enough and make enough money to open his own video store. In the first act, Aunt Ester dies after almost four hundred years of existence, eventually taking her cat with her also. It will need blood to revive it but for the mean time it has a grave in front of King's house that is encompassed by wire, set up by Stool Pigeon and Ruby advises Tonya. In the second act, King's true parentage is revealed to him by Leroy over Ruby's protests. Him and Leroy get into a fight, which scares Ruby into committing an explosive act which will leave one person dead, providing the dead cat with the blood it needs, and one alive. Once again the simplicity but at the same time the heaviness of the language stuns and delights me. Thank you August Wilson for giving us a DAMN good--and most of all brilliant--piece of drama.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)