BN.com Gift Guide

King Larry: The Life and Ruins of a Billionaire Genius

( 2 )

Overview

From Howard Hughes to Mark Zuckerberg, the public has always been fascinated by genius entrepreneurs who succumb to their eccentricities. Now, James Scurlock engages, educates, and entertains readers with the captivating story of DHL co-founder and billionaire Larry Hillblom.

King Larry begins with an early biography of Larry Lee Hillblom, a mercurial young man who grew up on a peach farm outside of Fresno, California. Hillblom co-founded DHL in 1969 (three years before FedEx), ...

See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$18.26
BN.com price
(Save 16%)$21.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $12.63   
  • New (6) from $12.63   
  • Used (1) from $18.25   
King Larry: The Life and Ruins of a Billionaire Genius

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$17.99
BN.com price

Overview

From Howard Hughes to Mark Zuckerberg, the public has always been fascinated by genius entrepreneurs who succumb to their eccentricities. Now, James Scurlock engages, educates, and entertains readers with the captivating story of DHL co-founder and billionaire Larry Hillblom.

King Larry begins with an early biography of Larry Lee Hillblom, a mercurial young man who grew up on a peach farm outside of Fresno, California. Hillblom co-founded DHL in 1969 (three years before FedEx), and it became the fastest-growing corporation in history. Hillblom’s expatriate life began in 1981, when he retreated to a small tax haven in the Western Pacific. There he led the resistance to American meddling in the Marianas Islands. Hillblom’s voracious appetite for underage prostitutes is another facet of his unusual story. In 1995, Hillblom’s amoral, thrill-seeking nature caught up to him when his seaplane disappeared off the coast of Anatahan, leaving behind an estate worth billions. Weeks later, five impoverished women and their attorneys came forward to challenge Hillblom’s will in a legal battle for his fortunes that continues to this day.

Meticulously researched and thoroughly engaging, King Larry will satisfy fans of such bestsellers as Confessions of an Economic Hit Man and The Accidental Billionaires .

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Bryan Burrough
…terrific…[Scurlock's] quest took him all over the world, from English mansions to California courtrooms, and from Honolulu, where he talked with early DHL employees, to Saipan, where he spent months poring over court papers to track down Mr. Hillblom's onetime, um, paramours in distant corners of Vietnam and the Philippines. Mr. Scurlock has returned with a story that is everything I enjoy in a book: strange, exotic, inspiring, extensively researched, clearly written and, yeah, sort of creepy.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
Larry Lee Hilblom (1943–1995) does not have the immediate name recognition of Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, or Howard Hughes, but the enigmatic founder of DHL has a story that is just as fascinating—and more mysterious—than any of these genius entrepreneurs. In his biography of the eccentric businessman, Scurlock (Maxed Out) traces Hilblom’s rise from humble beginnings on a Northern California peach farm through the founding of DHL and its meteoric rise to domination in the airfreight industry to the mysterious disappearance of his seaplane in the western Pacific in 1995. The chronology, twists, and turns of DHL alone are riveting, with one complex, legal battle after another threatening to derail the company, but the allegations that Hilblom fathered several children with underage girls in various Southeast Asian countries lend the book a darker, more sensational tone. While the dense accounts of DHL’s unending litigation battles may prove impenetrable for some, Scurlock sprinkles in enough of Hilblom’s eccentric personal life to keep the narrative lively and flowing. He meticulously researches both the business and personal fact and folklore of the entrepreneur’s life and weaves them into a gripping account of the mercurial, visionary, complicated billionaire’s life. (Jan.)
Library Journal
Documentary filmmaker Scurlock (Maxed Out: Hard Times, Easy Credit and the Era of Predatory Lenders) writes about the life and ventures of eccentric billionaire Larry Lee Hillblom. Hillblom cofounded DHL, the shipping company, in 1969, and it became the fastest-growing corporation in history. A business savvy entrepreneur, he also owned or co-owned over 50 other companies. Along the same lines as Ben Mezrich's The Accidental Billionaires and John Perkins's Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, this biography delves deeper into its subject's personal life. Scurlock covers Hillblom's early days growing up on a peach farm in Fresno, CA, his retirement from DHL in 1981, his retreat to an island paradise, the remainder of his life, and the debate over his estate and illegitimate children following his death in a 1995 plane crash. VERDICT This provocative book holds readers' attention throughout. The title, however, may mislead some to think the book is about television and radio host Larry King. Recommended for general readers, especially those interested in business biographies.—Lisa Felix, Mishawaka-Penn-Harris P.L., IN
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781416589235
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 10/18/2014
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 827,193
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

James D. Scurlock studied at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania before dropping out to pursue an entrepreneurial venture and later a documentary film career. His first film, Parents of the Year, won numerous awards and was an official selection of more than twenty-five film festivals. His first feature-length documentary, Maxed Out, explored our culture of debt and won the Special Jury Prize at South by Southwest. His first book, a companion to the award-winning documentary, was nominated for the National MS Society's "Books for a Better Life" Award. He has written, primarily about the impending (and now realized) financial crisis, for Slate, Newsweek, The Huffington Post, and AARP Magazine, among others. He has also appeared on numerous programs, including Nightline, The Today Show, and CNBC’s Power Lunch. Scurlock lives in Santa Monica, California.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2012

    good read, meticulously researched

    i suppose the probate part of the book is a bit dense, but it's worth pushing through to find yourself truly immersed in the mess Larry left behind. not sure how else to get the reader there. Hillblom was a perve, to be sure, but his life truly was a rags to riches story with an interesting twist--this rich guy actually ran from the limelight and seemed to enjoy being surrounded by poverty. and young girls, sadly. anyway, fascinating read and Scurlock is a darn good writer.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 30, 2012

    better late than never

    Larry Hillblom was not a “citizen of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands” (he was a United States citizen and CNMI resident), Magellan did not discover Saipan and call it “Island of Thieves” (that was Guam), betel nut is not taken with salt (it’s lime) and Yap lies not northward of Saipan but southward. Those and other meddling errors should not detract from the fascinating story of a self-made, idiosyncratic mastermind. As a famed San Francisco attorney said when asked why Larry frequented girlie bars in the Philippines, “it was, huh, a mere distraction.” That isn’t in the book but the author had to stop somewhere. Besides Larry never sweated the small stuff. He was a big-picture guy. And certainly the biography was ripe since more than a decade had passed and nobody had written one. It’s our fortune that James Scurlock, who never met Hillblom, tried to get to know this peculiar guy better by spending months pouring over the documents of the longest probate case in U.S. history, a million pages, and years interviewing dozens of people around the world who had had dealings with Larry. Of course, some people didn’t talk or tell him everything and you can‘t blame them either. The book abounds in interesting anecdotes. My favorite is when, in a classic game of one-upmanship, dapper Continental bigwig Frank Lorenzo is forced to personally hand the airline’s #1 priority pass to a skinny guy in t-shirt and jeans. Punk beats Wall Street. Who would of thought that? Larry did.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)