King New Breed R&B, Vol. 2

King New Breed R&B, Vol. 2

     
 

So what is New Breed R&B, anyway? According to the liner notes, the term originated shortly before this 2012 compilation to define "late 50s-early 60s pre-soul black acts that owed a lot to the blues, but had largely been neglected by long-term blues fans." Not exactly your pithy single-column genre category, but it's an apt enough description for the 24 tracks on… See more details below

Overview

So what is New Breed R&B, anyway? According to the liner notes, the term originated shortly before this 2012 compilation to define "late 50s-early 60s pre-soul black acts that owed a lot to the blues, but had largely been neglected by long-term blues fans." Not exactly your pithy single-column genre category, but it's an apt enough description for the 24 tracks on this disc, all released on the King label or its subsidiaries between 1955 and 1967. Though most of those are rarities that even New Breed collectors, should there be such things yet, will probably be unaware of, there are actually a few songs that some general rock/soul fans might well know. Little Willie John's "All Around the World" was a big early rock & roll classic, making number five on the R&B charts in 1955 and inspiring Little Milton's later hit "Grits Ain't Groceries." "I'm Tore Down" was one of Freddy King's biggest singles, also making number five on the R&B charts (in 1961). And the title phrase of Johnny Watson's "Gangster of Love" popped up in Steve Miller's "The Joker," though the songs are otherwise dissimilar. A few other well-known or semi-known names dot the compilation (the "5" Royales, Eugene Church, and Eddie Kirk, the latter better known as bluesman Eddie Kirkland), though there are quite a few artists who'll be recognized by a few, like the memorably named Guitar Crusher. The aforementioned songs aside, it's not on the level of the best King releases. For the most part, it's acceptable R&B/soul
ock & roll/blues crossover music, sometimes with a novelty-friendly humor, as heard in the raps for Hal Hardy's "Love Man" and one of the better songs, James Duncan's "Stop Talking to Your Child (Mother-in-Law)." The humor might be unintentional, however, in Donnie Elbert's "Wild Child," which almost sounds like someone singing "Fever" in a drag show. El Pauling & the Royalton's odd, gloomy minor-key blues "I'm a Cool Teenager," incidentally, is "5" Royales guitarist Lowman Pauling recording under a pseudonym.

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Product Details

Release Date:
05/08/2012
Label:
Kent Records Uk
UPC:
0029667237321
catalogNumber:
6723732
Rank:
100833

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Love Man  - Hal Hardy
  2. I’m Tore Down  - Freddy King
  3. When You Move You Lose  - Lee "Shot" Williams
  4. Send Me A Picture  - Mel Williams
  5. Let's Have A Good Time  -  Hi Tones
  6. Two Hearts  -  King Pins
  7. All Around The World  - Little Willie John
  8. You're Gonna Drive Me Crazy  - Dolph Prince
  9. Why Oh Why  -  Guitar Crusher
  10. It Hurts Inside  -  "5" Royales
  11. Slooptime USA  -  Bobby & The Expressions
  12. Stop Talking To Your Child (Mother In Law)  - James Duncan
  13. Geneva  - Eugene Church
  14. Why Did We Have to Part  - Herb Hardesty
  15. Gangster Of Love  - Johnny Watson
  16. I’m A Cool Teenager  -  Pauling
  17. Wild Child  - Donnie Elbert
  18. I’m So In Love  - Lee Williams
  19. You'd Better Come Home  -  Five Fabulous Demons
  20. I Promise You (I Won't Mention Your Name)  - Billy Conn
  21. Say Hey Pretty Baby  -  Sonny Thompson & His Orchestra
  22. Your Letter  -  Willie Wright & His Sparklers
  23. Let Me Walk With You  - Eddie Kirk
  24. What Makes You So Tough  - Teddy Humphries

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