The King of Little Things

( 2 )

Overview

Long ago in a faraway realm, the King of Little Things ruled happily over all things small - from buttons to beetles, from marbles to macaroni. When King Normous thinks he has finally become the ruler of all the world, he is enraged to learn that the King of Little Things still reigns happily in his tiny kingdom. Normous sends his army to defeat this upstart, but he finds he cannot outfight or outwit a king who holds sway over the little things of the world. After all, it is the...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (14) from $5.72   
  • New (7) from $10.09   
  • Used (7) from $5.72   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

Long ago in a faraway realm, the King of Little Things ruled happily over all things small - from buttons to beetles, from marbles to macaroni. When King Normous thinks he has finally become the ruler of all the world, he is enraged to learn that the King of Little Things still reigns happily in his tiny kingdom. Normous sends his army to defeat this upstart, but he finds he cannot outfight or outwit a king who holds sway over the little things of the world. After all, it is the little things that keep the big things going.

Winner of the 2014 PEN/Steven Kroll Award for Picture Book Writing

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
It’s hard to miss the point of this fable about the kindly King of Little Things (who had “everything he needed, and didn’t want for more”) and his victimization by the ambitious and obnoxious King Normous. Small, Lepp clearly feels, is beautiful. Yet the story doesn’t pall. Lepp revels in exploring the many ways the King of Little Things’ insignificant but loyal subjects serve him, offering help in an early skirmish (“the soldiers found mealworms in their bread, chiggers in their underpants, and fungus between their toes”), then comforting him with crumbs and seeds after he is imprisoned. When the King of Little Things decides he’s had enough, he sends out a plea for all little things to strike: “Boats listed. Words twisted. Lights unlit. Scarves unknit. And every little thing, everywhere, refused to work.” Wenzel delivers Mad magazine–style spreads of medieval feasts, battles, capes, and crowns. Brainy wordplay abounds, and a scavenger hunt is included, too. Lepp affirms living simply without sounding smarmy, and Wenzel offers a king whose underpants fall off. What’s not to like? Ages 4–8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Long ago, the King of Little Things happily rules over all things small, from coins and keys to knobby knees, from paper clips to lizard lips, from macaroni to fried bologna. Big kings, on the other hand, always want more: "bigger riches...bigger britches." King Normous wants to be king of the world. He gathers an army and thinks he has conquered all rulers. But his steward reminds him that he has missed the King of Little Things. So he sets out to "put this tiny king in his very small place." But with the help of all his subjects, the King of Little Things ruins King Normous' army equipment and food. When summoned to King Normous' tent and then sealed inside a cavern, the King of Little Things is saved by the small things everywhere. And King Normous is never the same. The text is spiced with rhymes, assonance, and alliteration, and visualized in opulent watercolor scenes crammed with details befitting the kings. There is a feel of the Middle Ages along with comic delivery of both the characters and settings. The end pages lay out some forty of the vital "little things" for readers to locate inside. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
09/01/2013
PreS-Gr 2—The King of Little Things kindly rules over everything small, from "coins, candles, combs, keys" to "barnacles, bats and fried bologna." Content in his kingdom, he "had everything he needed and didn't want for more." His nemesis and antithesis, greedy King Normous, is intent on conquering the tiny empire and presumes an easy victory. The King of Little Things's eclectic subjects come to the rescue and thwart Normous's armies ("the soldiers found mealworms in their bread, chiggers in their underpants, and fungus between their toes") and stage a worldwide revolt ("Lights unlit. Scarves unknit. And every little thing, everywhere, REFUSED TO WORK"). Wenzel's watercolor illustrations present a medieval world of turreted castles, banquet tables laden with food, and raiding soldiers. There are plenty of humorous details such as nails that spring from doors and buttons that pop from suspenders. The witty writing enlivens this fable about appreciating the small things in life.—Linda Ludke, London Public Library, Ontario, Canada
Kirkus Reviews
Don't underestimate the power and importance of small things. Trouble is brewing: Insatiably greedy King Normous wants to be king of the whole world. His giant army ruthlessly conquers every other kingdom and empire. He is happy until he learns of the existence of his polar opposite, "His Miniscule Majesty…the King of Little Things." Now he won't rest until he has conquered that realm as well. The little king is content among his small things, such as insects, coins and buttons, and he is not as weak as Normous believes. He involves all his very loyal subjects, those little things, to help repel the invasion, and King Normous' little things mutiny to join them. Naturally, there is a happy ending for everyone, except King Normous, of course, who is plagued by small things forever. Rich, image-filled language, including several rhythmic lists--"He raided realms. He squashed sovereignties. He eradicated empires"--emphasizes the two characters' opposing life views and highlights their battles. The tale moves briskly, with high drama and gentle humor, and allows readers to find the moral naturally. Wenzel's watercolor illustrations are in perfect harmony with the text, in both detail and tone. Endpapers depict an assortment of small things that can be found within the illustrations, encouraging further examination. Adults and children who read this delightful and imaginative book together will find lots to talk about. (Picture book. 4-9)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781561457083
  • Publisher: Peachtree Publishers, Ltd.
  • Publication date: 9/1/2013
  • Sales rank: 283,829
  • Product dimensions: 9.50 (w) x 10.50 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 13, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    What a treasure trove of delightfully interesting things and cri

    What a treasure trove of delightfully interesting things and critters. While the story alone is precious in its telling of haughty King Normous (for enormous) and his gluttonous raging appetite to be king of everything, and while the end result is his downfall at the hand of all the little things (screws, spiders, needles, pins, etc.) ruled by the King of Little Things, the illustrations pair so beautifully it is a reader's-trip to see it all.




    I love Bill Lepp's story and it is full of meaning and intent while still being told as a fairy tale with magical kingdoms. Mr. Lepp's weaving words is a wordsmithing skill that delights the reader. And I love the illustrations that work so beautifully with the story.  This is truly a good book for home libraries, public and school libraries, and gift-giving. Speaking of which, we have a major gift-giving season coming us. 
    DISCLOSURE: I was provided a complimentary copy to review by Peachtree Publishers with no obligation for positive review. No compensation was received for this review.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 5, 2013

    This is a beautiful picture book with a nice message. Even witho

    This is a beautiful picture book with a nice message. Even without the moral, it is an entertaining story. When King Normous tries to take over the world, he doesn't count on the power of the little things. But the little things love their king, and they work together to defeat King Normous. I love the concept that everything, no matter how small or insignificant, matters. In fact, often it's the little things that seem to matter most.

    While the story itself is well written and engaging, the artwork is outstanding. David Wenzel is a wonderful storyteller in his own right and his illustrations give the book an extra flourish. It makes me so happy when I find picture books with a great story, good message, and gorgeous artwork.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)