The King of the Golden River

The King of the Golden River

4.3 14
by John Ruskin
     
 

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Little gem of Victorian literature, written in 1841 and published in 1889, tells a tale of the two Black Brothers who spite the wind and the King of the Golden River—and then for their misdeeds, are turned into stone. Includes 22 captivating illustrations.  See more details below

Overview

Little gem of Victorian literature, written in 1841 and published in 1889, tells a tale of the two Black Brothers who spite the wind and the King of the Golden River—and then for their misdeeds, are turned into stone. Includes 22 captivating illustrations.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Ruskin's 1850 fairy tale, a paean to generosity and environmental conservation, gets a pleasing visual treatment from Ghiuselev (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland). Ruskin's story concerns the unscrupulous "Black Brothers," Hans and Schwartz, drunkards who hoard their corn and don't pay workers: "It would have been very odd, if with... such a system of farming, they hadn't got very rich; and very rich they did get." Their gentle 12-year-old sibling, Gluck, suffers from their cruelty. After the angry South West Wind ruins the Brothers' material wealth, Gluck must melt his favorite mug, with its "very fierce little face, of the reddest gold imaginable"; when Gluck pours the liquid metal, it shapes itself into the title's king, who tells Gluck how to transform the Golden River into treasure with holy water. Hypocritical Hans and Schwartz each try their luck, but refuse to share their water with dying individuals; the offended king says, "they poured unholy water into my stream." Gluck, who does share, reaps the rewards. Ghiuselev works with a soft touch in gray pencil, and tints some images with earthy sepia tones that allude to the gold and copper of the story. His steep precipices and rocky glaciers nod to the Romantic sublime; he depicts the characters as 17th-century landowners in breeches and billowing cloaks, posing as dramatically as N.C. Wyeth's swashbuckling figures. Ghiuselev's outdoor images can be too ethereal-the people never seem to stand on solid ground-yet animistic characters like the Wind look satisfyingly mysterious. A sophisticated book design, with a dark-ochre strip down every vertical margin, offsets this ethically-minded classic and appeals to fairy tale admirers. Ages 6-up. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
This addition to the "Candlewick Treasures" collection is the only fairy tale ever written by John Ruskin. The richly illustrated story is called a magical tale and tells of a young lad named Gluck who was poorly treated by his two brothers, Schwartz and Hans. They were successful farmers living in Treasure Valley near the Golden River, a stream resembling a shower of gold. After a visit from a little old gentleman, who is treated kindly by Gluck and cruelly by his brothers, the farm is no longer fertile and the brothers decide to become goldsmiths and melt down all the gold they possess. The magic occurs when they attempt to melt down Gluck's favorite drinking mug. The face on the mug becomes a dwarf who sends them off on a quest for gold. The story occasionally seems a bit muddled, but the message is clear. Goodness triumphs over greed and worldly possessions are less important than a kind heart. 2000, Candlewick Press, Ages 8 to 12, $11.99. Reviewer: Carolyn Mott Ford
Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
This tale, reminiscent of the Brothers Grimm, is imbued with a moral based upon The Golden Rule. The author wrote the story more than 150 years ago, and it is nicely presented in this volume with detailed drawings accompanying the text. Three brothers lived in a fertile valley blessed with a waterfall that looked like a shower of gold and was called the Golden River. The two older brothers, Hans and Schwarz, were evil, selfish men who treated their young brother Gluck as a slave. Then, a strange looking little man showed up. He was ill-treated by Hans and Schwarz; they even punished Gluck for his attempts to be kind to the stranger. The little man was actually the "South-West Wind, Esquire" and he was so angered by their treatment that he caused their valley to suffer a drought. The brothers had to melt down their gold, and when they insisted on melting down Gluck's mug, the little man appeared. He sent the three brothers on a quest. The selfishness of the two older brothers brought about their downfall. Gluck, however, treated those in need with kindness and his goodness was rewarded. Reviewer: Carolyn Mott Ford

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781497592537
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
04/09/2014
Pages:
30
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.06(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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The King Of The Golden River 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wonderful fairy tale, rich with imagination. Loved it!
Krin-kin More than 1 year ago
Do not pay for this. This is nothing more than a copy-paste of the book off of Project Gutenberg with a book cover.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thx
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