King Tiger vs IS-2: Operation Solstice 1945

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Overview

As a prelude to the post-war concept of a single "main battle tank" design, vehicles during World War II tended to be categorized as light, medium, and heavy, depending on their use. In this last category, tanks had grown in size, weight, and firepower to counter ever-improving anti-tank weapon systems. This resulted in changes in tactics and doctrine to better integrate heavy armor into a combined arms system. This was especially true on the Eastern Front, where the open terrain promoted armor action and a rapid...

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King Tiger Vs IS-2: Operation Solstice 1945

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Overview

As a prelude to the post-war concept of a single "main battle tank" design, vehicles during World War II tended to be categorized as light, medium, and heavy, depending on their use. In this last category, tanks had grown in size, weight, and firepower to counter ever-improving anti-tank weapon systems. This resulted in changes in tactics and doctrine to better integrate heavy armor into a combined arms system. This was especially true on the Eastern Front, where the open terrain promoted armor action and a rapid cycle of improvements. The Soviets were quick to develop vehicles that were able to fight the Tiger I on an equal footing by late 1943, such as the up-gunned T-34/85 and the self-propelled ISU-152s. Because the American T-26/M-26 Pershing arrived late in the war, and the British Centurion not at all, only the Soviet IS-2 serves as an example of a heavy design that was fielded in large battlefield numbers. The Soviet drive to cut off enemy forces in East Prussia during Operation Solstice (February 1945) is a prime example of this conflict. The Germans, had limited resources, and were strategically on the defensive, but enjoyed ever-shorter logistic distances as they retreated, and fought in an environment and terrain that played to the strengths of the technically-superior King Tiger. The IS-2 was lighter, more maneuverable, and far more numerous, and used these assets to its advantage. This battle, fought in the closing months of the war, depicts the classic late-war contrast between the military doctrines of Germany and the Soviet Union.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Author David R. Higgins brings to us a wealth of historical, tactical, doctrinal, technical, organizational, and archival information about the ultimate armor adversaries of World War Two." -Frederick Boucher, AeroScale
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781849084048
  • Publisher: Osprey Publishing, Limited
  • Publication date: 8/23/2011
  • Series: Duel Series
  • Pages: 80
  • Sales rank: 385,764
  • Product dimensions: 7.30 (w) x 9.80 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

David R. Higgins attended the Columbus College of Art & Design, and received a BFA from Ohio State University and an MISM from Keller. In addition to the Roer River Battles he has written over twenty articles for magazines such as Strategy & Tactics, Armchair General, and World at War, as well as MCSGroup, a conflict simulation provider for the US Defense Department. He lives in Columbus, Ohio.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 2, 2012

    Tanks

    Im a tank expert i know all about all of the tanks like in the is,uk,girmane, all of it so here is some good info for free first the IS 2 was one of the best ussr tanks befor the IS 6 and IS 8 it was made many to save birland and other places It had sloped armor so not a lot can pen it and it had a 20mm gun and shots HE ronds as well i was in one befor man when your in that thing you fell like a god but its not that fast its top speed is 20 km at least Now some info

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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