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The Kingdom of the Cults

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Overview

The authoritative reference work on major cult systems for nearly forty years. Working closely together, Ravi Zacharias and Managing Editors Jill and Kevin Rische (daughter of Dr. Martin) have updated and augmented the work with new material. This book will continue as a crucial tool in countercult ministry and in evangelism for years to come. Among cults and religions included are: Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, New Age Cults, the Unification Church, Baha'i Faith, Hinduism, ...
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Overview

The authoritative reference work on major cult systems for nearly forty years. Working closely together, Ravi Zacharias and Managing Editors Jill and Kevin Rische (daughter of Dr. Martin) have updated and augmented the work with new material. This book will continue as a crucial tool in countercult ministry and in evangelism for years to come. Among cults and religions included are: Jehovah's Witnesses, Mormonism, New Age Cults, the Unification Church, Baha'i Faith, Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, and more.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764228216
  • Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/1/2003
  • Edition description: Revised
  • Pages: 704
  • Sales rank: 118,537
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 2.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr. Walter Martin held four earned degrees, having received his doctorate from California Coast University in the field of Comparative Religions. Author of a dozen books and a half-dozen booklets and many articles, Dr. Martin died in 1989.

Ravi Zacharias, the general editor, is president of Ravi Zacharias Ministries, a respected speaker, and author of many books.

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Table of Contents

KINGDOM OF THE CULTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. The Kingdom of the Cults
2. Scaling the Language Barrier
3. The Psychological Structure of Cultism
4. Jehovah's Witnesses and the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society
5. Christian Science
6. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons)
7. Spiritism--The Cult of Antiquity
8. The Theosophical Society (Gnosticism)
9. Buddhism--Classical, Zen, and Nichiren Shoshu
10. The Baha'i Faith
11. Unitarian Universalism
12. Scientology
13. The Unification Church
14. Eastern Religions
15. The New Age Cult
16. Islam--The Message of Muhammad
17. The Cults on the World Mission Field
18. The Jesus of the Cults
19. Cult Evangelism--Mission Field on Your Doorstep
20. The Road to Recovery

Appendix Section
Appendix A: The Worldwide Church of God--From Cult to Christianity
Appendix B: The Puzzle of Seventh-day Adventism
Appendix C: Swedenborgianism
Appendix D: Rosicrucianism
Bibliography
Scripture Index
Subject Index

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 19 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 18 of 19 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2005

    Still The Best on the Cults

    Those who argue that Dr. Martin had anything derogatory in mind when he called his book Kingdom of the Cults, in reference to his study of various religions, have either purposely disregarded Dr. Martin's own direct statements in the book, or simply didn't read the book carefully. Despite false allegations about Dr. Martin's doctorate ('degree mill') education and other unsubstantiated assertions about people 'lambasting' him for 'inaccuracies,' the Kingdom of the Cults remains a perennial classic in its field. What Dr. Martin attempted to do, as he clearly stated, was to evaluate various belief systems as they compared with the doctrines of the historic Christian faith. All the cults, and many major religions like Islam, deny certain historic Christian doctrines: The trinity, the deity of Christ, etc. With scholarly information and exhaustive documentation using mainly primary source material, Dr. Martin evaluates, in about 20 chapters, religious traditions from The Jehovah's Witnesses, Christian Science, Mormonism, and Spiritism, to Islam, Seventh-day Adventism, and Unitarianism, to name a few. It should be noted that although Dr. Martin includes the Adventists in his book, he clearly says that he does not consider them to be a cult religious system outside of orthodoxy, but a Christian sect with some heterodox beliefs, such as soul sleep and soul annihilation. Since the exhaustive nature of this book and limited review space does not permit a review that does justice to Dr. Martin's work, I will only give a few examples of how he evaluated some religious teachings in comparison to historic, orthodox doctrine, focusing on how Dr. Martin contrasted the Jesus of orthodoxy with the 'Jesus' of the cults. Explaining Jehovah's Witness doctrine using their own works in context, Dr. Martin wrote: 'For Jehovah's Witnesses, their Jesus is an angel who became a man. He is a god, but he is not God the Son, second Person of the Holy Trinity' (p. 379). Earlier in the book, Dr. Martin demonstrated how the Watchtower Society purposely mistranslated John 1:1 so that Jesus becomes 'a god' instead of God, which is pointed out as simply bad Greek grammar and exegesis (pp. 85, 86). Quoting Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science, from her 'Science and Health' book, Dr. Martin demonstrates that her 'Jesus' is also an unorthodox one: 'The Christian who believes in the First Commandment is a monotheist. Thus he virtually unites with the Jew's belief in one God, and recognizes that Jesus Christ is no God as Jesus Christ Himself declared, but is the Son of God...' (p. 378). Dr. Martin also demonstrated from primary sources that Mrs. Eddy plagiarised from many sources to produce her 'Science and Health' book. The plagiarism is obvious when you see it as it reads in Dr. Martin's book in parallel columns, as it was reproduced prior to his book in the New York Times of July 10, 1904. This was not something Dr. Martin invented, but a fact publicized in a well-known newspaper prior to his work. And finally, Dr. Martin deals with the Mormon view of Jesus from their own literature, which he quotes as saying, 'Each of these gods, including Jesus Christ and his Father, being in possession of not merely an organized spirit, but a glorious body of flesh and bones...' (p. 380). Dr. Martin then goes on to further explain their position by stating, '...in fact, the Mormons have a full pantheon of gods. Jesus, who before His incarnation was the spirit-brother of Lucifer, was also a polygamist, the husband of the Marys and Martha, who was rewarded for his faithfulness by becoming the ruler of this earth' (p. 380). The sad fact is, most who criticize Dr. Martin's work either have not really read the book, have not thoroughly researched behind his information, or simply are not really qualified to make sweeping charges of 'pseudo-scholarship' and so forth that they make in classic ad hominem style. Apparently those who are within the cults D

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 15, 2010

    A must for students of Apologetics!

    As time passed over the last 2000 years, we have seen movements claiming to be christian. All with one or more things in common. The rejection of the bodily resurrection of Christ, of the Deity of Christ, or rejection of the doctrine of the Trinity. All which can be proven to be believed by even 1st century Christians like Ignatius or Polycarp. This book calls these cults out and challenges anyone to compare and see for themselves.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    indepth study of the cults

    "kingdom of the cults" is a very remarkable book. it gave me a better understanding of many of the cults that are hidden and very dangerous out in the world today and take people money. each chapter has a very indepth write up on a certain cult along with their leader and literature and how they stay hidden and try to take in people with their deceptive beliefs. this is a wonderful book and would be great for a Bible study and a gift idea for a friend or family member most important it will let people be aware of those who come to your door some of these groups live right near by kingdom of the cults is very helpful.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2008

    An indispensable resource for the discerning Christian

    This volume is considered the definitive book on cults ¿ not only those that are allegedly ¿Christian,¿ but also the overtly non-Christian, all of which deny the deity of Jesus Christ and the all-sufficient atoning power of His death on the cross. Dr. Martin covers them in depth in this outstanding book, which also taught me a great deal about true Christianity along the way.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 14, 2002

    An Excellent Resource for Defending the Christian Faith

    This book carefully examines the deeper history and theology of many popular 'Cults.' Martin also provides Biblical refutations to the errors of their theology. Most non-Christians can't believe what they read (especially those involved in the 'Cults'). Many have said that what Walter Martin wrote was 'made up' or a deliberate 'distortion of the truth.' This is not so and the evidence proves otherwise. Most people (since they can't seem to argue his Biblical apologetic of cultic theology) try to attack his character (which is a desperate sign of one backed into a corner). Some people invloved in the 'Cults' claim 'that is not what we believe.' These people who object are most likely relatively new to their 'religion-cult' and haven't been taught some of the 'controversial' doctrines as of yet. The great thing about this book is that Walter Martin doesn't just present his opinions, he presentes the documentation and citations (which no one can discredit) to back everything that he says. This is a great resource for those who want to learn about the 'Cults' and Christians who seek to defened their faith against the 'Cults.' Most of these 'Cults' have a beautiful outward (and sometimes Christian) appearance. But when one searches for the root of their theology it's not as beautiful and Christian as it seems. Those 'Christians' who flat out object to the data presented in this book are more than likely involved in a 'Liberal Theology' where they view the Bible as un-reliable or corrupted, probably deny the Deity of Christ, deny Salvation by Grace and not by works, and view all religions as other 'acceptable' ways to God (like the so called 'Christian' Steve does in his review). Martin also provides an apologetic on some 'main stream' religions (like Islam, Buddhism and Hinduisim) in the appendix of the book. If you love the Bible and appreciate the facts, then you'll love this book. If not, you'll be trying to convince yourself it's all just a lie!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2000

    if you dont like the truth, than dont read it!

    Whether Mr. Martin was 'correct' in every single religous practice, Does not mean that the entire validity of his work should go out the window. It is very clear that LDS does not like the book, denouncing it as falsehood and incomplete. What matters the most is the unsaved in this world, to become aware that their is a loving creator that loves them unconditionally, and wants them to turn away from their sin. So that they can be saved and not die eternally away from God,and if religions out their really love their followers they would be willing to put their indifferences aside and just save them. If this book enlightens people about the false ways and practices Useing Jesus Christ as a cover for their own agenda, then I am all for it.I hope all truth seekers have their priorities straight and for them not to be waved for 'Freedom of religous rights'. The truth is not broad it is narrow, and not easily accepted for it shows us for who we really are:people in need of salvation and God can give it through Jesus:But will you receive it?

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2006

    if really want to know

    If you want to know the truth about something, do you not go to the source? If want to know the truth about any religion, mainly Jehovah's Witnesses ask one of them.

    1 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2005

    Great

    I originally bought this book 20 years ago. It was very helpful to me in helping me understand the cults (I was 15). I still think this book is very relavent. I recommend it to anyone interested in knowing what Mormons, JW, and others believe.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2002

    an example of ignorant filth feeding ignorant minds

    Let me say first that I am a Christian (although that label has taken on a semi-negitive connotation due to people like Walter Martin and his devoted readers). Then allow me to express how disgusted I am by Martin's ignorance when he claimes that solid and legitimate religons like Buddhism, Hinduisim (who both have been around hundreds of years longer than Christianity has)and Islam are no more than 'false-teaching' cults. The English Oxford Dictionary defines a cult as: 1.) A religion or religious sect generaly considered to be false under the guidence of a charismatic leader = [i.e.--The Pope, Jesus Christ. And, I hate to tell you, but Christianity is not regarded as 'TRUE' by everyone] 2.) A formal means of expressing religious reverence, ceremony and ritual = [i.e.--Christianity, Weekly Mass] 3.) Usualy a non-scientific method or regiment [beleif in the Trinity, Sacrements, Angels, Heaven, Hell] claimed by its origionator [Jesus Christ] to have exclusive power for its practitioners [Salvation]. Sound much like your religion , Martin?you need to re-revise your book and add all forms of Christianity to it.[Christians world wide can't even agree on the right way to practice and which bible translation to follow!] You need open your eyes and relize that your religion is no more valid than anyone else's is.

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2000

    Standing the Test of Time

    I have read numerous books containing information regarding the practices of people involved in the different forms of religion, and I can say without a doubt that the doctrines that are set forth in Dr. Martin's book, Kingdom of The Cults are pinpoint accurate. One only needs to cross-reference the various doctrines examined to the the actual quotations from the Cults themselves which is obviously the path that Dr. Martin followed. I personally appreciated all the research and facts that were stated and I might add, as a matter of record! Opinions about people such as Dr. Martin and their personal lives matter not to someone such as myself, who is more interested in the facts and not who delivers them. I loved the section in the back of the book, commonly known as the bibliography. Dr. Martin was very careful to list every single reference contained in the book pertaining to the doctrines of the cults examined and also added pertinent information about the founders and their known lifestyles. This book is a goldmine of information to the serious student of religion and continues to stand the test of time.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2014

    Most cults covered well . everything said about SDA's is true ,

    Most cults covered well . everything said about SDA's is true , but not complete ( I used to be one)
    Cult of ROMAN CATHOLICISM not covered. Its by far the WORST
    Why go to the source? they just lie to cover their mistakes , as with freemasonry---they are TOLD TO LIE TO everybody , INCLUDING THEIR MEMBERS
    bBEST TO TALK TO SOMEONE WHO HAS " come out from among them--then get a second and third opinion for comparison . Be a good Berean--check it thouroughly
    ANGELFIRE

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2013

    This is arguably the best reference work in one volume giving co

    This is arguably the best reference work in one volume giving comprehensive details of each of the non-Christian religions.  Worth every penny.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2003

    A very well documented work, powerful in its logic...

    Dr. Martin (and, most importantly, his body of work) has survived the assault of character that usually accompanies non-confrontative disagreement, with references. His even-handed, scriptural treatment of ALL denominations (including his own, Southern Baptist) is always fair, and never resorts to name-calling or emotionalism. Indeed, I don't agree with all of his points, but he forces me to 'hit the Book' and prove my own opinions (read that:disagreements) to myself. Isn't that the sign of well-docmented and referenced argument?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2002

    1 word Awesome

    Martin uses the Bible to defend the Bible against many of the new cults. IE, Mormonism, Jehovas Witnesses,etc.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2000

    A must have for any Christian apologist.

    A must have for anyone interested in the cults. This book has been one of the premier books on the subject since the 70's. Walter Martin covers a lot of ground and gives a lot of detail to the history and belief systems of many cults. This is a very good reference book. I have three editions of this book - the last one being the updated version which includes a CD. I have found this to be a good book to give as a gift to anyone interested in the cults. I recommend it to everyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2000

    Excellent Resource

    Kingdom of the Cults is an excellent resource to have on your shelf. It breaks down the major cults and helps to understand the major tenets each subscribes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 1999

    Very Poor Documentations

    This author has written many books, and all I have seen had had very poor documentation. He makes many claims in the past that have been proven to be totally false. A good reference book should have many references, but this book uses heresay more than facts. Case in point: In this book there is a place were he attack a founder of a religion, by asking ' the amazing facts that none of his friends and followers knew him'. From that he them only uses those quotes from them that spoke evil of the person, and the more evil the more credit the author give to the statement. Case in Point: In the mid 1980's the Mormon document bomber Hoffmann in the trial admitted that he Hofmann created false documents and event about Joseph Smith. But this author had a Radio Program call: 'The Bible Answer Man', after Hofmann admitted that the Documents were fiction, Walter Martin still told his audiance that the Hofmamm documens still painted a true Picture of Joseph Smith. Those who will rely on this book, and other like it, are those who are totaly not interested in finding the turth.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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