A King's Commander (Alan Lewrie Naval Series #7)

( 5 )

Overview

Alan Lewrie is now commander of HMS Jester, an 18-gun sloop. Lewrie sails into Corsica only to receive astonishing orders: he must lure his archenemy, French commander Guillaume Choundas, into battle and personally strike the malevolent spymaster dead. With Horatio Nelson as his squadron commander on one hand and a luscious courtesan who spies for the French on the other, Lewrie must pull out all the stops if he's going to live up to his own reputation and bring glory to ...

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Overview

Alan Lewrie is now commander of HMS Jester, an 18-gun sloop. Lewrie sails into Corsica only to receive astonishing orders: he must lure his archenemy, French commander Guillaume Choundas, into battle and personally strike the malevolent spymaster dead. With Horatio Nelson as his squadron commander on one hand and a luscious courtesan who spies for the French on the other, Lewrie must pull out all the stops if he's going to live up to his own reputation and bring glory to the British Royal Navy.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"You could get addicted to this series. Easily." —The New York Times Book Review

"Another rowdy cruise for the immensely appealing Lewrie, with almost two decades to go in the Anglo-French belligerency." —Kirkus Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
It's 1793 and lusty young Alan Lewrie of the British navy (H.M.S. Cockerel, etc.) is now commander of HMS Jester, patrolling the Ligurian Sea in order to support the onshore Austrian army, harass the French navy and remind various Italian states to mind their business. The main plot centers on Lewrie's attempts, goaded by the English spymaster Twigg, to catch and kill the French spymaster Choundas, a wonderfully malevolent enthusiast for the Terror known as "Le Hideux" ever since Lewrie horribly wounded and mutilated him nine years earlier. Le Hideux plots to rob a large British silver shipment and to capture Lewrie, hoping to torture and maim him, or at least to kill him. As usual, Lambdin offers a tersely effective explication of the political background-as well as an abundance of sea action (often described in language that will baffle landlubbers), depictions of shipboard life and discussions of the effective leadership style of Horatio Nelson, who's also on hand. There's also some superstitious talk about Celtic sea gods, annoying Franglais from Lewrie's doxy ("Wiz you, I am 'appy! Eef eet tak' time for to be ze grande lady, c'est dommage. I be mistress to one man, on'y. Vous!"), an occasional anachronism and a brief mention of the impending arrival of a young artillery officer "with the improbable name of Napoleon Bonaparte." Brisk and light, this is much closer to C.S. Forester's Hornblower series than to Patrick O'Brian's Aubrey/Maturin books, but it will please fans of historical nautical adventure nonetheless. (Feb.)
Kirkus Reviews
Scapegrace British naval officer Alan Lewrie (H.M.S. Cockerel, 1995, etc.) sails into troubled waters during the third year of England's war with revolutionary France.

In the spring of 1794, Lewrie leaves Portsmouth for the Mediterranean at the helm of his first command, an 18-gun sloop renamed Jester after its capture from the French. Arriving in Corsica, he renews acquaintance with the luscious Phoebe Aretino, the demimondaine who loved and lost one of Lewrie's fallen shipmates. Rousted from his cozy love, the lusty captain (whose wife and children cause him manageable pangs of remorse) joins a Genoa-based squadron (led by the young, aggressive Horatio Nelson) on blockade duty offshore northern Italy. Eager for glory, not to mention prize money, Lewrie assaults a coastal town garrisoned by French troops, silencing its harbor battery and seizing a string of supply vessels. Initially pleased by his subordinate's bold stroke, Nelson distances himself in the wake of atrocity allegations; besides, the unfounded reports make Lewrie easy prey for Zachariah Twigg, a Foreign Office intelligence operative. The raid also alerts Guillaume Choundras, a vindictive Breton with whom Lewrie has crossed swords before, to the hapless captain's whereabouts. To plant misinformation in the right circles and lure his old foe into battle, Lewrie is obliged to bed Claudia Mastandrea, an aristocratic courtesan who spies for the French. Surprised by Phoebe at this pastime, Lewrie slinks back to sea, where he indeed catches up with the villainous Choundras. After an exciting shallow-water chase, he follows the former privateer onto the beach at Vado Bay, where the Austrians are massing for an attack on French occupation forces. Having chased his quarry far inland, Lewrie fells him with a single shot from a long rifle; believing Choundras dead, the resilient mariner returns to the good ship Jester for a long voyage home.

Another rowdy cruise for the immensely appealing Lewrie, with almost two decades to go in the Anglo-French belligerency.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590131305
  • Publisher: McBooks Press
  • Publication date: 1/1/2008
  • Series: Alan Lewrie Naval Series, #7
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 448
  • Sales rank: 238,305
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.22 (d)

Meet the Author

Dewey Lambdin is a sailor, a director, a writer, and a producer for television and advertising. He is the author of the Alan Lewrie Naval Adventures series and What Lies Buried: A Novel of Old Cape Fear. He lives in Nashville, Tennessee.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 25, 2011

    Odd Transition

    A funny thing happens a little past halfway in this story - the narrative shifts. There we are, following Ram Cat Lewrie with every word, when suddenly we're instead looking through the eyes of his arch nemesis. It's a little awkward, even disconcerting, though it switches back to Lewrie in the next chapter. But it mars the author's otherwise fine prose. Granted, it helps the story unfold, but it is most ineloquent. Not that it's serious enough to give up on the series - I'm hooked!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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