King's War (Knights of Breton Court Series #3)

King's War (Knights of Breton Court Series #3)

5.0 1
by Maurice Broaddus
     
 

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FROM THE DRUG GANGS OF DOWNTOWN INDIANAPOLIS, THE ONE TRUE KING WILL ARISE.

King has been betrayed, but he has no time to lick his wounds - he has to draw his people together to fight the ultimate foe in this conclusion to the stunning Knights of Breton Court trilogy.

File Under: Urban Fantasy [ Street Gangs | Drug Wars | Wild Magic | Betrayal

Overview

FROM THE DRUG GANGS OF DOWNTOWN INDIANAPOLIS, THE ONE TRUE KING WILL ARISE.

King has been betrayed, but he has no time to lick his wounds - he has to draw his people together to fight the ultimate foe in this conclusion to the stunning Knights of Breton Court trilogy.

File Under: Urban Fantasy [ Street Gangs | Drug Wars | Wild Magic | Betrayal ]

e-book ISBN: 9780857661319

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for "King Maker" - The Knights of Breton Court, Book 1:

"Broaddus delivers in a voice that both whispers and roars and cannot be ignored."
- Bram Stoker and International Horror Guild Award-winner Gary A. Braunbeck

"The language is fierce and evokes the gritty realism of life on the streets. [The supernatural elements] drift through the novel like smoke... King Maker is going to be the best read of 2010."
- FantasyLiterature.com

"King Maker is a fascinating novel, a true urban fantasy in the literal definition of the term... [it] should be on every SF fan's shelf."
- Adam Christopher

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780857661302
Publisher:
Watkins Media
Publication date:
10/25/2011
Series:
Knights of Breton Court Series , #3
Pages:
400
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 6.90(h) x 1.20(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Maurice Broaddus graduated in 1993 from Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis and holds a Bachelor's of Science degree in Biology. He works as an environmental toxicologist for a local firm, Commonwealth Biomonitoring. He comes from a family that includes several practicing obeah (think: Jamaican voodoo) people, but is now the facilitator for the church, The Dwelling Place. He is married with two children.

His areas of interests includes religious studies, folklore, and myths. The author lives in Indianapolis, Indiana.

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Kings War 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Talekyn More than 1 year ago
The back cover of the book proclaims "THE WIRE meets EXCALIBUR in this stunning fantasy from the dark streets of America." It's an apt description of this entire trilogy, and once again Maurice Broaddus does not fail to impress. On the surface, the idea of retelling the Arthurian cycle in Indianapolis seems too "high concept" to work. But Broaddus doesn't simply retell the classic Arthurian stories in modern dress; he alters storylines, conflates characters, and changes relationships throughout his trilogy to make the story his own and allow it to breath. Le Morte d'Arthur, John Boorman's Excalibur, and even The Sword in the Stone may be his touchstones, but the execution is pure Broaddus. In this final installment, King is recovering from his betrayal at the hands of Lady G and Lott, and while he licks his wounds the world goes on around him. I think it takes real courage as a writer, real trust in your relationship with your readers, to keep your title character "off stage" for 75% of the final novel in a trilogy. Broaddus does this, and it works ... perhaps too well. The scenes that King is actually active in (as opposed to just being mentioned) carry a weight that I didn't feel was always present in the first two books despite the fact that the author has regularly switched POV away from King in portions of every volume. Which is not to say that 75% of the book is filler. The King-centric chapters have the weight they do because we as readers know what else is going on (with his circle of confidantes and with his enemies) even when King doesn't. And of course, we as readers have the burden, like Merle, of knowing how it all has to end, because like Merle, we've lived/read it before. I've read a lot of Arthurian fiction, and Broaddus still had me hoping that maybe this time the story would end differently, because over three books I've come to care not just for King but for all of his circle in all of their imperfectness. I've commented in reviews on the previous two books about the dream-like quality of Broaddus' writing; it continues here. The narration is not necessarily completely linear; characters' timelines overlap in odd ways that occasionally have you thinking "wait, wasn't he just ... I could have sworn..." the way the best dreams/nightmares do. Some might mistake this as poor plotting, but I think the point the author is making is similar to Poe: "all that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream." The fluidity of point-of-view and time are a vital part of what makes this series stand out so; the original story cycles were full of odd time overlaps and name changes and Broaddus plays with that conceit expertly. I love it and hope he tells more stories in this style and perhaps even in this cycle. There are a lot of secondary characters I'd love to see the author explore in novellas of their own, and plenty of stories Broaddus could tell without having to craft a direct sequel.