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Kiss Alive! 1975-2000
     

Kiss Alive! 1975-2000

4.0 2
by Kiss
 
The '70s saw an overabundance of live albums, with quite a few effectively launching various rock band's careers. This is especially true of Kiss and their classic 1975 double album, Alive! Since it was such a success, the group has issued follow-ups from time to time over their career, including 1977's Alive II and 1993's

Overview

The '70s saw an overabundance of live albums, with quite a few effectively launching various rock band's careers. This is especially true of Kiss and their classic 1975 double album, Alive! Since it was such a success, the group has issued follow-ups from time to time over their career, including 1977's Alive II and 1993's Alive III. So, it shouldn't come as a surprise that the masters of merchandising came up with the idea of issuing all three as a box set in 2006, Kiss Alive! 1975-2000. But to entice Kiss fanatics who already own the aforementioned three albums, a fourth unreleased live disc is included, Alive IV. Not to be confused with 2003's Kiss Symphony: Alive IV, the original Alive IV was set to be released in 2000, and was dubbed the "millennium concert" by fans (since it was recorded New Year's Eve 1999 in Vancouver) -- before being shelved. Reflecting a typical setlist from their now humorously billed "Farewell Tour" (the group has launched several tours since then), the CD features Kiss classics ("Deuce"), then-new material ("Psycho Circus"), plus non-makeup-era material performed for the first time by the original lineup ("Lick It Up"). Although it doesn't hold a candle to the original Alive! set (which still remains arguably the best live rock album ever released), the inclusion of Alive IV is sure to inspire members of the Kiss Army to break out their piggy banks once more.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/21/2006
Label:
Island
UPC:
0602517069046
catalogNumber:
000758602
Rank:
32748

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Kiss   Primary Artist
Peter Criss   Drums,Vocals
Ace Frehley   Guitar,Vocals
Gene Simmons   Bass,Bass Guitar,Vocals
Paul Stanley   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Vocals
Bruce Kulick   Guitar
Eric Singer   Drums,Vocals
Derek Sherinian   Keyboards

Technical Credits

Michael Bolton   Composer
Peter Criss   Composer,Author
Ace Frehley   Composer,Author
Kane Roberts   Composer
Gene Simmons   Composer,Author
Paul Stanley   Composer,Author
Vinnie Vincent Invasion   Composer
Russ Ballard   Composer
Desmond Child   Composer
Kim Fowley   Composer
Sean Delaney   Composer
Bob Ezrin   Composer
David Hewitt   Engineering Consultant
Eddie Kramer   Producer,Engineer,Author
Bob Kulick   Author
Bruce Kulick   Author
Peter McCabe   Engineer
Adam Mitchell   Composer
Vini Poncia   Composer
Eric Singer   Author
Corky Stasiak   Engineer,Author
Tony Byrd   Guitar Techician
Karl Cochran   Composer
Ken Sharp   Liner Notes,Interviewer,Essay
Andy Engel   Artwork
Margery Greenspan   Art Direction
Fin Costello   Author
Dennis Woloch   Author
Francis Scott Key   Composer
Curt Coumo   Composer
Ryan Null   Photo Courtesy
Mike Rush   Guitar Techician
Stan Penridge   Composer
Bob Erzin   Composer
Barry Ackom   Guitar Techician
Bill Aucoin   Author
Chuck Elias   Drum Technician
Bruce Redoute   Author
Hank Schmel   Author

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Kiss Alive! 1975-2000 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Alive! back in 1975 was exciting and the best way to hear KISS, live onstage, with all the Paul Stanley banter of 'how many people like the taste of alcohol??', the long drum solo on "100,000 Years" and the rest of what made up arguably the best live album ever. Then two years later, KISS does it again with 'Alive II', not as good but still rockin' live versions of songs from 1976 - 77 (with a 4th side of studio cuts) ... then in the 90s they repeat the formula and by then KISS has long went from a rockin' guilty pleasure to a joke that became a shadow of its former self, not to mention more of a marketing machine than a rock band (not that marketing machines are bad, just that KISS by then simply wasn't the KISS of the makeup years, which for some was alright if that's the only KISS they knew) ... and now this box set with the Milennium concert. Fans would be better off with the recent DVD set 'Kissology vol. 1 (1974 - 77)' which in most fans views are their vintage, best years. Lick that up!