Kiss My Arp

Kiss My Arp

by Andrea Parker
     
 
Depeche Mode-and-Detroit-techno loving London DJ Andrea Parker might not be pulling down the massive media coverage that met jungle jock-turned-poptronica diva DJ Rap, but her debut is a much more exciting piece of music. Blending Björkian ethereal emoting ("The Unknown," "Clutching at Straws") with dense, dubby multifaceted electroscapes

Overview

Depeche Mode-and-Detroit-techno loving London DJ Andrea Parker might not be pulling down the massive media coverage that met jungle jock-turned-poptronica diva DJ Rap, but her debut is a much more exciting piece of music. Blending Björkian ethereal emoting ("The Unknown," "Clutching at Straws") with dense, dubby multifaceted electroscapes ("Breaking the Code," "Some Other Level"), she has succeeded in making an underground aesthetic accessible without losing a nugget of integrity. Admittedly, though, "accessible" is a relative term here. After early tracks featuring breathy vocals and delicate melodies, we slide into a subterranean labyrinth where every wall hides a secret passage and the very floor bubbles and rumbles like lysergic lava. These tracks are so packed with information -- permutating Autechre-esque beatscapes, cinematic strings, minute melodic motives that can be anything from hauntingly eerie to cheekily grating -- you almost forget that her building block is minimalist electro. But like boundary-pushing composers from µ-Ziq to the recently reborn Trent Reznor, Parker knows how to blur styles and tweak listener expectations -- while keeping in mind that a little soulfully sung sugar helps the avant-garde medicine go down.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Rick Anderson
The debut from acclaimed DJ and slightly less acclaimed electronica artist Andrea Parker is a winning mix of the electronic and the organic, a rather dark but never depressing examination of the psyche that relies equally on vintage synthesizers (hence the album title), cutting-edge beatcraft, and real orchestral string arrangements. And she sings pretty well, too. The album opens with the downbeat and contemplative "The Unknown," on which a minor chord progression and how-low-can-you-go bassline are leavened by big synth washes and a soaring chorus. "In Two Minds" is a fairly abstract synth piece with pizzicato violins and a chirping analog noise that Allen Ravenstine would kill for. "Sneeze" charmingly samples the sound of Parker sneezing into a surprisingly funky four-bar rhythm loop and also uses analog synthesizer to approximate the sound of water-pot percussion. "Return of the Rocking Chair," however, is a ponderous and annoying waste of time, but everything else on this album is well worth listening to.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/02/1999
Label:
Beggars Uk - Ada
UPC:
0607618501822
catalogNumber:
85018

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