Overview

McCoy’s hardboiled noir classic, about an Ivy League graduate’s criminal rampage through the seedy underground and glitzy high society of an unnamed American city To escape prison, Ralph Cotter uses the same genius for planning and penchant for cold-hearted violence that helped earn him a spot in the slammer in the first place. On the lam in a city where he knows nobody, Cotter has nothing to lose, no conscience to hold him back, and no limit to his twisted ambition. But in the midst of a criminal spree, a ...
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Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye

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Overview

McCoy’s hardboiled noir classic, about an Ivy League graduate’s criminal rampage through the seedy underground and glitzy high society of an unnamed American city To escape prison, Ralph Cotter uses the same genius for planning and penchant for cold-hearted violence that helped earn him a spot in the slammer in the first place. On the lam in a city where he knows nobody, Cotter has nothing to lose, no conscience to hold him back, and no limit to his twisted ambition. But in the midst of a criminal spree, a grift leads him to the boudoir of wealthy heiress Margaret Dobson, a woman with the power to peel back the rotten layers of his psyche and reveal the damaged soul beneath. Vicious and thrilling, Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye is a look at one man’s relentless attack on American society, conjuring one of the most memorable antiheros of twentieth-century noir fiction. This ebook features an extended biography of Horace McCoy.

Horace Stanley McCoy (1897–1955) was an American novelist whose gritty, hardboiled novels documented the hardships Americans faced during the Depression and post-war periods. McCoy grew up in Tennessee and Texas; after serving in the air force during World War I, he worked as a journalist, film actor, and screenplay writer, and is author of five novels including They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1935) and the noir classic Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye (1948). Though underappreciated in his own time, McCoy is now recognized as a peer of Dashiell Hammett and James Cain. He died in Beverly Hills, California, in 1955.

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Editorial Reviews

Gale Research
In Tough Guy Writers of the Thirties, Sturak deemed Kiss Tomorrow Good-bye "McCoy's most intriguing and ambitious novel. In its thematic preoccupations with states of awareness, failure and success, death and rebirth, and the quest for self-identity, it reflected a period of crisis in his own life which was dominated by a mood of disintegration and complicated by a promising turn of fortune," as his earlier novels suddenly enjoyed success overseas. Kiss Tomorrow Good-bye, remarked Sturak, "stands as both the climax of his career and a paradigm of his creative imagination."
Library Journal
McCoy's hard-boiled thriller was published by Random in 1948. The plot follows its thoroughly ruthless criminal protagonist from a chain gang escape through his rejoining a band of crooks and reentering a life of crime. The book was filmed in 1950, with veteran tough guy Jimmy Cagney in the lead. A gritty, gutsy thriller.
Kirkus Reviews
This once-famous noir novel (by the author of They Shoot Horses, Don't They?) was originally published in 1948 and inspired an excellent (and long neglected) James Cagney film. In a grating and deliberately stiff style that reflects his arrogant egotism, college-educated "Ralph Cotter" (his alias) relates the story of his escape from a prison farm, involvement with willing and dangerous women, and complicity with a corrupt establishment dominated by crooked cops and lawyers that he thinks he can bend to his own invincible will. Cotter is a pugnacious, violently sensual Middle American Raskolnikov, and his remorseless amorality resonates as chillingly today as it must have 50 years ago. Aficionados of hard-boiled fiction who think that Hammett, Cain, and Jim Thompson set the standard ought to take a look at Horace McCoy.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781453246733
  • Publisher: Open Road Publishing
  • Publication date: 4/17/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 250
  • Sales rank: 749,712
  • File size: 461 KB

Meet the Author

Horace Stanley McCoy (1897–1955) was an American novelist whose gritty, hardboiled novels documented the hardships Americans faced during the Depression and post-war periods. McCoy grew up in Tennessee and Texas; after serving in the air force during World War I, he worked as a journalist, film actor, and screenplay writer, and is author of five novels including They Shoot Horses, Don’t They? (1935) and the noir classic Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye (1948). Though underappreciated in his own time, McCoy is now recognized as a peer of Dashiell Hammett and James Cain. He died in Beverly Hills, California, in 1955.  
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