The Kissing Diary

The Kissing Diary

3.3 3
by Judith Caseley
     
 

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Twelve-year-old Rosie Goldglitt is a never-been-kissed, hopeless romantic. Her mother has a new boyfriend. So why can't Rosie attract the attentions of the cutest boy in the seventh grade, Robbie Romano? Is it because she's two inches taller than he is? Is it her horrible name? Or is she simply a dork? If only she could be more like her rival, the perfect and

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Overview

Twelve-year-old Rosie Goldglitt is a never-been-kissed, hopeless romantic. Her mother has a new boyfriend. So why can't Rosie attract the attentions of the cutest boy in the seventh grade, Robbie Romano? Is it because she's two inches taller than he is? Is it her horrible name? Or is she simply a dork? If only she could be more like her rival, the perfect and popular Mary Katz, then maybe Robbie would notice her. As Rosie navigates the ups and downs of adolescence, she eagerly anticipates the experience of a first kiss - when she's not completely grossed out at the thought of it. But by the time the big dance rolls around, Rosie manages to surprise herself, in more ways than one.

This perceptive and funny story captures the bittersweetness and euphoria of growing up, the messiness of having a crush, and how sometimes the most unexpected things in life are the most enjoyable.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Heidi Hauser Green
Twelve-year-old Rosie Goldglitt has decided that the diary she received from her father to explore her feelings about her parents' divorce will be better used as a "kissing diary." Her primary goal is to capture the attention (and, therefore, the lips) of Robbie Romano, the cutest boy in her seventh-grade class. Of course, that is not going to be easy. Rosie seems to attract Robbie's scorn more often than his interest, and she never knows how to interpret his actions. What pre-teen girl does? Rosie's angst is sure to reassure any girl who is just beginning to be interested in boys. Judith Caseley's portrayal of the social pressures that Rosie faces among her peers seems accurate. The story's tidy happy ending is appropriately foreshadowed throughout the text—and, pleasingly, does not involve Robbie Romano. A note about formatting: In spite of the book's title, this is not just a diary. Most of the text is recounted in a typical, third-person narrative style; only a couple of paragraphs at the end of each chapter are written as from Rosie's diary.
School Library Journal

Gr 4-6 When 12-year-old Rosie Goldglitt's father leaves the family, he gives her a diary so she can document her feelings about the divorce. But she's more interested in writing about kissing. However, since she doesn't have much personal experience, she ends up writing about lip-gloss shopping, school projects, her mom's love life, and, of course, her crush on Robbie Romano. Caseley's characters are offbeat but familiar, and the dialogue between the kids and their parents is spot-on. Over the course of the novel, Rosie faces gossip, B.O., parental arguments, and a trip to the principal's office with surprising (and possibly unrealistic) resilience. She also widens her circle of friends to include the only girl on the school wrestling team-without losing any of her old chums. The final matchmaking scheme is a little predictable, but the book is notable for what it leaves unresolved. Caseley wisely chooses not to tie up the loose ends of the divorce and the tough decisions the family has to make about Rosie's aging grandfather. This book covers territory that's already been mined by the likes of Phyllis Reynolds Naylor and Judy Blume, but the titillating title is sure to grab the attention of lip-gloss-popping tweens.-Emily R. Brown, Providence Public Library, RI

Kirkus Reviews
These days, a last name of Goldglitt is the least of 12-year-old Rosie's problems. Figuring out the dos and don'ts of boyfriend behavior, a first real kiss and tolerating Mary Katz's evil and derogatory public comments cause Rosie much mental anguish. Add in her parent's divorce, mother's new male friend and grandfather's imminent Alzheimer's and Rosie is headed for a tumultuous emotional and physical climax that lands her in school detention with barely a friend left in her support. Caseley spins a believable tween lifestyle full of complicated bumps and cracks along an uphill road of emerging adolescent issues. Voices alternating between a narrator and Rosie herself through her chapter diary entries provide a personal perspective. Rosie's budding romantic notions together with her more pressing concerns lay a foundation for a serious message that while verbal bullying can be ignored, physical violence is never acceptable. More importantly, Caseley allows her protagonist to learn from her mistakes and develop newfound confidence through her relationship with peers. Will ring true with the female tween crowd in today's complicated world. (Fiction. 10-13)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781466893689
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
05/05/2015
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
645,994
File size:
0 MB
Age Range:
11 - 15 Years

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