Kissing Games of the World

( 3 )

Overview

“A classic romance. . . . It’s been done countless times, but rarely as engagingly as Shelton does it in this novel.” –Boston Globe

Jamie is a free-spirited artist and devoted single mom with a slightly unorthodox living situation: in exchange for free rent, she looks after the grandson of her much older landlord. But when Harris Goddard dies of a heart attack–naked and splayed out in Jamie’s bed–nobody believes that he and Jamie were just ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $8.89   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 1 of 2
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$8.89
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(1122)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
0307393666 *BRAND NEW* Ships Same Day or Next!

Ships from: Springfield, VA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 1 of 2
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

“A classic romance. . . . It’s been done countless times, but rarely as engagingly as Shelton does it in this novel.” –Boston Globe

Jamie is a free-spirited artist and devoted single mom with a slightly unorthodox living situation: in exchange for free rent, she looks after the grandson of her much older landlord. But when Harris Goddard dies of a heart attack–naked and splayed out in Jamie’s bed–nobody believes that he and Jamie were just roommates.

With the rumor mill buzzing and two small children to care for, Jamie’s life is further upended when Harris’s handsome son, Nate, a charismatic jet-setting salesman, shows up unannounced at his childhood home to settle the estate and reclaim the five-year-old son he left behind.

As Jamie’s and Nate’s highly guarded worlds collide, can these two damaged souls manage to see the good in each other . . . and maybe more?

“Shelton’s warm, sentimental love story is told with a tenderness of heart and a nurturing eye.” –Romantic Times

“Quite wonderful. . . . Like Anne Tyler, Shelton seems to possess a nearly boundless capacity for empathy. She has the ability to make us love her characters for their faults, not in spite of them.” –Connecticut Post

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Kissing Games of the World has the shape of a classic romance, in which opposites at first repel, then attract, and after many ups and downs find love. It's been done countless times, but rarely as engagingly as Shelton does it in this novel.”
The Boston Globe

“Quite wonderful. . . . Like Anne Tyler, Shelton seems to possess a nearly boundless capacity for empathy. She has the ability to make us love her characters for their faults, not in spite of them.”
Connecticut Post

“Shelton’s third novel is an engrossing, charming, and often funny exploration of love and relationships that result…the author [explores] love in its different incarnations.”
Library Journal, starred review

“An absolute treat, Shelton’s work rarely falters and is filled with realistic twists, complex characters and a moving conclusion.”
Publisher Weekly

“[A]s the seemingly star-crossed lovers navigate their rocky path, with children in tow, they eventually discover their true destination, their true home.”
Booklist

"Shelton's warm, sentimental love story is told with a tenderness of heart and a nurturing eye guiding complexly drawn characters. She effortlessly melds love and loss with heartrending care, exposing the layers of a budding romance with a deft hand. It's full of humor, flaws, and a togetherness of spirit fit for any modern love story where family is what you make it."
Romantic Times

“Sexy hero, lovable heroine, adorable kids–Kissing Games of the World has it all. A complete delight. Fall into this buoyant, funny, genuinely touching story of two incomplete people finding the rest of themselves in each other. I loved it.”
—Patricia Gaffney, New York Times bestselling author of Mad Dash

“Shelton’s greatest talent is a gift for juxtaposing comedy and tragedy to the pulsing beat of the modern-day mating dance.”
BookPage

Publishers Weekly

Journalist Shelton's poignant third novel (after What Comes After Crazy) elevates the oft-told stories of opposites attracting and sons struggling against their fathers. The residents of Chester, Conn., assumed that 60-something Harris Goddard was up to his old womanizing ways when single mother Jamie McClintock and her five-year-old son, Arley, moved in with him and his five-year-old grandson, Christopher. Though Harris and Jamie's affections are purely platonic, the rumor mill begins to churn when Harris dies and is discovered naked in Jamie's bed. Everyone is suspicious of her, including Nate Goddard, Christopher's father, who shows up to finally claim his son with plans to sell Harris's house and take his grieving son on the road with him. As Nate tries to put his plan into play, the surprising Goddard family backstory unwinds and Jamie, also wracked with pain, finds herself attracted to Nate and vice versa. An absolute treat, Shelton's work rarely falters and is filled with realistic twists, complex characters and a moving conclusion. (Nov.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

Shelton's third novel (after A Piece of Normal) is an engrossing, charming, and often funny exploration of love and the relationships that result. Artist Jamie McClintock and her son, Arley, are happy where they are. A year ago, Harris Goddard asked them to move in with him and his grandson, Christopher, and share responsibilities. The arrangement works-until Harris drops dead from a heart attack. Suddenly, Jamie and Arley have to find a new place to live, and five-year-old Christopher is going to be uprooted from the only home he's ever known to live with his estranged father. Nate Goddard left his son in the care of his father after his wife was killed in a car accident, and somehow he has never managed to make his way back. Harris's death forces Nate to return home, and while he's eager to get to know Christopher, he hasn't a clue about how to be a father. The presence of earth mother Jamie and asthmatic Arley in the family home isn't making his attempts any easier. Though the slow-building and complicated relationship between Jamie and Nate plays a role in the story, it is the relationships between Nate and his son and Nate and his deceased father that allow the author to explore love in its different incarnations. Recommended for all public libraries.
—Jane Jorgenson

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307393661
  • Publisher: Crown/Archetype
  • Publication date: 11/10/2009
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 5.22 (w) x 8.04 (h) x 0.85 (d)

Meet the Author

SANDI KAHN SHELTON is the author of the novels What Comes After Crazy and A Piece of Normal and three nonfiction books on parenting. A feature writer for the New Haven Register, she is also a frequent contributor to Working Mother, Family Circle, Woman’s Day, and Redbook.

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

When Jamie McClintock’s elderly roommate, Harris Goddard, suddenly dies of a heart attack, she is left not only to grieve the loss of her dear friend, but to figure out how she can bear to part with the child she has been helping to raise, Harris’s grandson Christopher–and how she can explain to her own son, Arley, that they have to leave their home and send Christopher off to live with his father.

To make the situation worse, once Christopher’s father, Nate, rolls into town in the middle of the night, Jamie is overwhelmed with her dislike for him and her fears for Christopher’s fate. Jamie was warned by Harris about Nate’s irresponsibility–Nate did, in fact, leave his son to be raised by his grandfather after the untimely death of his young wife, and now leads the freewheeling life of a world-traveling salesman. But this isn’t Jamie’s only point of contention. Nate thinks parenthood is going to be a breeze and that Christopher can just tag along on plane rides and hang out in conference room meetings. Jamie, of course, knows this will never work with a five year old, and in the few days she and Nate spend together packing up and planning the funeral, they fight passionately about that point and nearly everything else.

But once they've gone their separate ways, they come to see just how much they need what the other has to offer. Nate, stunned by loneliness and the sometimes hilarious difficulties of being a single parent, sees what he's thrown away by leaving his old home town, while Jamie learns to put aside her dismal romantic history and let herself trust again.

1. Harris presents the story of how he came to be Christopher’s caretaker by explaining that Nate was far too irresponsible to be a father, especially after his wife, Louisa, died. However, when Nate speaks about it with Jamie, he claims that Harris didn’t want him to be a part of Christopher’s life and insisted on him staying far away. Why do you think Harris prevented Nate from being a part of Christopher’s life? What would be his motivation in doing so? Do you think this was something that Nate believed in order to walk away relatively guilt-free? Why?

2. By Nate’s account, Harris was a horrible father to him, abandoning him and then ignoring him for much of his life. Why then would Nate and Louisa move in with Harris? Were the two men trying to reconcile or was it purely a necessity for the young couple? Why?

3. After Louisa’s death, why would Nate leave Christopher to be raised by the father who abandoned him?

4. Arguably, Jamie is the most grounded and responsible character, despite her hippie inclinations. However, toward the end of the novel Lucy says to her, “You’re the one who does what she wants. You have your art. And you don’t do anything you don’t want to. Anything that’s just for money. It’s me who has to worry about the mortgage and the bills. I’ve always had to take care of you, even from the time we were little and you were too shy to get to know anybody. It’s always been me, me, me!” (p. 272) How does this argument shed new light on Jamie’s lifestyle? Did you believe Lucy? Why or why not? Did the argument make you see Jamie as irresponsible or rather as taking life as it comes and following her happiness? Do you think Lucy is jealous of Jamie? Why?

5. Chief Cooksey is also antagonistic to Jamie. Do you think his anger toward her is as simple as him wanting to protect Harris from a “gold digger”? Or does his viewpoint speak to something greater–some fundamental dislike of Jamie and her life choices?

6. When Chief Cooksey tells Nate about how Harris’s body was found, why didn’t Nate confront Jamie? Why did he choose to believe that Jamie had lied to him?

7. What did you make of Lainey Haney asking Jamie to rejoin the Campfire Kids as leader of the jamboree? What does her inclusion of Jamie say about the town and the viewpoint of the younger generation–especially in comparison to the views of Chief Cooksey?

8. There are so many character dichotomies throughout the text–Harris and Nate, Nate and Trace, Jamie and Nate, Jamie and Lucy, Jamie and Tina, and Christopher and Arley. However, rather than the pairs being simple foils of each other, they seem to share both similarities and differences, and all the characters have both good and bad qualities. What do you make of all these pairings? What are the similarities and differences in each of the pairs?

9. Describe the moment where Nate proved that he could be and wanted to be not only a provider for, but a parent to Christopher. How did he show that he could be a good partner for Jamie? When was that turning point?

10. Toward the end of the novel, both Nate’s and Jamie’s lives fall apart. After arguing with her sister, Jamie is prompted to leave Lucy’s house and become temporarily homeless, first camping by the pond and then squatting in the abandoned house. Meanwhile, overwhelmed with caring for Christopher and trying to maintain a long-distance relationship with Tina, Nate loses his job. What is revealed in their individual declines?

11. In this novel, even the house is a character. How do Harris’s attempts to repair it, Nate’s tearing it apart, and Jamie’s squatting in it represent aspects of each person’s character?

12. This novel seems to put forth the idea that people can change. Do you think that this is true? Who in the novel most evolves? What are the benefits or drawbacks of the characters’ evolutions?

13. After Christopher breaks his arm in the whip line, Chief Cooksey tells Nate, “’I’ve been thinking. This Jamie…well, what’s she gonna do? She’s got a sick boy, lots to think about.’ He stared off into space. ‘Life or death all the damn time. She had to do what she did. Lemme just say, if you want to blame her for this, it’s probably gonna end up being me you should blame.’” What led Cooksey to have this change of heart about Jamie? What has he learned?

14. The novel also speaks to the idea of family. What do you think constitutes a family? Were Harris and Jamie a family? Are Nate and Jamie?

15. As Denise Morgan outlines it, kissing games are the things in life one doesn’t take seriously. Given that definition, what do you think is the significance of the book’s title?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2014

    Look cute and mys..... & sad to :'(

    Yes it dose :)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 17, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    This is a terrific character driven contemporary romance

    In Chester, Connecticut no one who knows sexagenarian Harris Goddard is shocked when much younger single mom Jamie McClintock accompanied by her asthmatic five-year-old son Arley moves in with him and his five-year-old grandson Christopher. Everyone ignores the kids being the same age and perhaps the mom might be there to care for Christopher; the assumption is womanizing Harris has his latest woman move in with him.<BR/><BR/>However, rumors and scandal explodes when a naked Harris is found dead in Jamie's bed. Everyone assumes the worst about her and some suspect she killed her paramour. Harris¿ son Nate believes Jamie is wrong for his son Christopher so he comes to his late dad¿s house determined to take his child with him, sell the home, and kick mother and son to the curb. However shocking both of them, Jamie and Nate are attracted to one another, but both has demons even before his dad was found in her bed.<BR/><BR/>This is a terrific character driven contemporary romance filled with twists and misconceptions. Nate and Jamie do not want their attraction for several reasons, but nether can prevent it from happening. Their respective kids act like children so they enhance the relationship by both driving the adults together and part. Sandi Kahn Shelton provides a wonderful tale of love using a common theme mad fresh by a strong cast.<BR/><BR/>Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)