Kitchen Coach: Weeknight Cooking

Overview

Kitchen Coach Jennifer Bushman can help you get good food on the table Monday to Friday and enjoy making it! She'll help you set up an efficient kitchen and identify the weeknight cooking challenges you may face?working late, keeping to a budget, pleasing picky eaters, juggling family schedules?then guide you to great recipes to suit your need or mood of the day. You and your family will be glad you cooked!

  • "What to Cook" chart to solve your ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (26) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $13.99   
  • Used (25) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$13.99
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(35)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
2004 Softcover New with no dust jacket 0764543148. BRAND NEW! Ships immediately with free tracking. Not ex-lib. Not a remainder.; Trade PB; 0.7 x 10.5 x 8.4 Inches; 216 pages.

Ships from: Santa Clarita, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Kitchen Coach Jennifer Bushman can help you get good food on the table Monday to Friday and enjoy making it! She'll help you set up an efficient kitchen and identify the weeknight cooking challenges you may face—working late, keeping to a budget, pleasing picky eaters, juggling family schedules—then guide you to great recipes to suit your need or mood of the day. You and your family will be glad you cooked!

  • "What to Cook" chart to solve your "What's for dinner?" questions
  • Meal-planning cues—from Easy Preparation to Something Special
  • 150 simple, healthy recipes for all kinds of weeknight situations
  • Sensational salads, hearty pastas, fresh fish entrees, and tempting chicken recipes
  • Themed dishes for "comfort food" or sophisticated "spa cooking" nights, and more
  • Fun foods for kids—including wraps, tacos, pizza, and foods-on-a-stick

"Jennifer is a working woman's dream. . . . There is something for everyone's palate in this book. If you love to cook, or just love to eat, this is all you need!"
—Elizabeth Vargas, anchor, ABC News

"Jennifer Bushman's creative dishes can stir even the most jaded, overworked cook. This is an invaluable book to help survive our rushed, stressed modern lives."
—Shirley O. Corriher, author of CookWise

"Finally a book that matches . . . [Jennifer's] vibrant, lively, and creative personality. . . . Every kitchen needs Jennifer as their 'kitchen coach'!"
—Joanne Weir, host of the PBS series Weir Cooking in the City and author of Weir Cooking in the City

"Jennifer Bushman's . . . enthusiasm reaches right out from the page and there is no reason not to cook once you have Jennifer's book in hand."
—John Ash chef, teacher, and author of John Ash Cooking One on One

"Jennifer Bushman, champion cooking teacher, personifies a true Kitchen Coach: always guiding, encouraging, and inspiring."
—Flo Braker, author of The Simple Art of Perfect Baking and Sweet Miniatures

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Practical tips trump celebrity gloss in this handy first offering from Bushman, owner of a Nevada cooking school and a syndicated TV cook. Bushman swears "cooking even a couple of times a week will make you happier." Her formula for achieving domestic bliss-choosing simple, fresh ingredients that stimulate the senses while offering a healthful alternative to prepared food and takeout-isn't news, but the 150 recipes offer some pleasingly creative ways of transforming basic ingredients, seen in such recipes as Penne with Puttanesca Sauce, as well as "spa" recipes like Linguine with Tomato-Fennel Sauce, which offers a fancier alternative for only marginally more prep time. While the book's 23 chapters present an array of cuisines, with chapters on how to prepare simple Asian, Mexican and Mediterranean meals, Bushman also pays tribute to unfussy comfort foods like Quick Macaroni and Cheese. Bushman's casual, fun approach to dining (relax, let your senses guide you, eat breakfast at dinner time if it makes you happy) should appeal to busy cooks. Photo insert not seen by PW. Agent, Stacey Glick. (July) Forecast: Bushman offers a great value, covering ethnic cuisine, vegetarian entrees, kids' snacks, sandwiches, etc. However, she's competing with many other books by TV cooks with higher profiles, so sales could prove challenging. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Bushman and her husband run a cooking school called the Nothing to It! Culinary Center in Reno, NV, and she is the host of "Nothing to It" television cooking spots. Her first book presents 150 recipes for busy cooks, with dozens of tips and hints to make their lives easier, from how to organize the pantry to what to look for when buying poultry. Organized into 20 some small chapters, from "Wrap It Up!" to "The Asian Express," the recipes are an eclectic selection; many seem rather familiar. For area libraries and large general collections. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764543142
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 7/5/2004
  • Series: Kitchen Coach Ser.
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 232
  • Product dimensions: 10.50 (w) x 8.44 (h) x 0.57 (d)

Meet the Author

JENNIFER BUSHMAN and her husband own and run the Nothing To It! Culinary School and Center in Reno, Nevada. Jennifer Bushman is the producer and star of the Kitchen Coach TV news food segments. She is also a culinary ambassador to Fine Cooking magazine and the spokesperson for the American Heart Association.

SALLIE WILLIAMS is a food writer and cooking instructor and the author of six cookbooks, including Vegetables on the Side and The Complete Book of Sauces.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

Why Cook?

Is Your Kitchen Ready?

Sensational Salads.

The Sandwich Board.

Wrap It!

Tacos and Enchiladas for Everyone.

Midweek Pizza Party.

On a Stick—Skewered Foods.

Wok Works.

Mix-and-Match Pastas and Sauces.

Hearty Pasta and Noodle Dishes.

It’s Chicken, Tonight!

Catch of the Day.

Meat Dishes for Every Day.

Asian Express—Takeout at Home.

Flavors of the Mediterranean.

Comfort Food.

No-Meat Nights.

Spa Cooking.

Breakfast for Dinner.

Vegetables and Sides.

Sweet Endings.

No-Trade Lunches.

Kids in the Kitchen.

Classroom Snacks.

Index.

Metric Conversion Guide.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Kitchen Coach

Weeknight Cooking
By Jennifer Bushman Sallie Y. Williams

John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7645-4314-8


Chapter One

It's Chicken, Tonight!

Easily prepared, reasonably priced, and infinitely versatile, chicken is one of the best foods to rely on for weeknight meals. From a chicken salad in the summer to a whole roasted chicken in cold months, a simple light sauté to crispy, soul-satisfying fried chicken, the choices are almost endless. By trying different herbs and spices you can make even more exotic dishes from around the world.

To enjoy a chicken dinner, you have to start with a really good bird. Below are some essentials for picking and preparing quality chicken-whether you are going to cook a whole chicken and make use of every part, or if you make dinner frequently with chicken breasts, as I often do. With good-quality chicken, the right techniques, solid recipes and flavoring ideas, and a little creativity, you can enjoy making chicken any or every night of the week.

Chicken Facts

The rising popularity of chicken has unfortunately led to the mass production of poultry. This has caused the bulk of chicken available to be commercially raised birds that lack flavor. Good chickens do exist and their availability is growing. You may need to spend a little time tracking them down, though.

What to Look For

If possible, buy chickens or chicken parts from a poultry store or a reputable food merchant whosestaff knows about its products. Ask for the source of the chicken and what it has been fed. Free-range chickens, those allowed to hunt and peck for their food, are going to be more flavorful. This doesn't mean that all large-scale production chickens will be tasteless. Try to find out the source of the chicken and if they were fed a diet rich in grains.

Choose a chicken with the skin on and the bone in, unless the recipe specifies otherwise. The skin should be creamy yellow or white (usually the skin color is determined in part by what the bird eats) and should look moist. The fat should be well distributed. You should look for chickens that are packed on ice or are well chilled in a refrigerated case and that smell fresh.

Varieties of Chicken

Broiler-fryers: Young tender birds that are well suited for quick high-heat cooking. They range from 2 1/2 to 4 pounds.

Roasters: Birds that are slightly older and heavier and are raised for roasting in the oven. They weigh 3 1/2 to 8 pounds or more.

Stewing chickens: Older birds that are generally tougher and are best stewed or braised. They weigh from 3 to 5 pounds or more.

Capons: Male chickens that have been neutered as chicks, resulting in tender, flavorful large-breasted roasting birds. They weigh from 6 to 10 pounds.

Cornish game hens: Miniature hybrids of chicken and Cornish gamecock, each hen usually weighs about 1 to 1 1/2 pounds and provides one large serving or two small.

Cleaning and Storing Chicken

As soon as you get it home, loosen the chicken from the wrapping and place it in the coldest part of the refrigerator. (Make sure that the package isn't leaking. If any liquid is seeping out, put the chicken in a plastic bag or in a bowl before placing it in the refrigerator.)

Cook the chicken within two days. Before cooking, rinse it with cold water and pat it dry with paper towels.

To freeze the chicken for up to 2 months, wrap it in a large airtight freezer bag. Thaw in the refrigerator for 24 hours.

Cutting Up a Chicken

Although for most nights you may find it easier to buy chicken already cut up, doing it yourself will save you money and provide more flavorful meals. The whole chicken will also yield extra pieces that can be used for stock. Try cutting it up during the weekend or on a weeknight when you aren't in a rush.

The techniques involved in cutting up or disjointing the chicken are fairly simple. A sharp boning knife or a good pair of poultry shears is all you will need. Some recipes call for quartered or halved chickens. You can do this or have the butcher do it for you. If you don't want to touch the chicken directly, you can wear close-fitting kitchen or surgical gloves (found in kitchen stores and drugstores), then discard them when you are done.

1. Remove the legs: Place the chicken on the cutting board, breast side up, with the legs facing toward you. Locate the joint by moving the leg, then cut through the skin between the thigh and body to remove the leg. Repeat on the other side.

2. Separate the thigh and leg: Bend the leg sharply to locate the joint between the leg and thigh. Cut through the joint to separate the two pieces. Repeat on the other side.

3. Remove the wings: Move the wing to locate the joint next to the body. Cut through this joint to remove the wing. Repeat on the other side.

4. Cut off the back: Starting at the neck opening, cut through both sides of the rib cage, separating both breasts from the remaining carcass.

5. Remove the breastbone: Holding the breast skin side down, slit the thin membrane covering the breastbone in the center. Grasp the breast and flex it upward to pop out the bone. Pull the bone free, using the knife if necessary.

6. Cut the breast in half: Place the breast skin side down on the cutting board. Cut along the center of the breast, through the cartilage, to split it in half.

Oven-Barbecued Chicken

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

  •   EASY PREPARATION

This is by far my favorite recipe for roasted chicken. For best flavor, the chicken is pan-browned, then roasted. Serve it with your favorite potatoes, carrots, or green beans, and a green salad. You will have a perfect meal every time. It's so easy, you will serve it often.

1 whole chicken (about 4 pounds), cut into pieces with skin intact, back discarded, or 3 to 4 pounds of whatever chicken parts you prefer

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 cup barbecue sauce (the spicier the better)

4 or 5 fresh rosemary sprigs or other herbs, for garnish (optional)

1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

2. Rinse the chicken pieces and pat them dry. Allow the chicken to rest on a cookie sheet for 20 minutes.

3. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large, heavy ovenproof skillet or gratin dish. Brown the chicken on both sides, turning only once, cooking each side 5 to 6 minutes. Arrange chicken skin side up in the skillet.

4. Brush with the barbecue sauce and roast in the oven for 25 minutes-longer if the breasts are very large-until the chicken reaches a temperature of 160°F on an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast, basting several times with sauce. If the breasts and thighs are done but the legs-which have more fat-are not, remove the breasts to a platter and let the legs cook for a few more minutes.

5. Transfer the cooked chicken to a warmed platter.

6. Garnish with rosemary sprigs, if you like. Serve the chicken very hot with the pan juices in a bowl on the side.

TIP: To brown chicken properly, follow these tips:

Bring chicken to about room temperature so it will cook more evenly.

Use a large pan to avoid crowding. (Overcrowding will cause the chicken to steam in its juices rather than brown.)

When the oil begins to bead and smoke slightly, add the chicken with the presentation side down first-this would be either the skin-on side, or the side that had the skin.

Brown the pieces until they are a light caramel color and then move them to a clean baking sheet.

TIP: Warmed plates and platters keep hot foods hot longer. You can warm them in a plate warmer if you have one, in a 200°F oven for 20 minutes, or in a clean sink full of hot tap water. Dry the plates or platters well before using.

Chicken with Grapes

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

  •   SOMETHING SPECIAL

When I was in college, I used to make a chicken dish with a mustard cream sauce that impressed all my friends. This enhanced version has the addition of sweet grapes to balance the tangy richness of the sauce.

4 medium boneless skinless chicken breasts, or if the breasts are more than 10 ounces each, use only 2 and slice them in half horizontally

Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 teaspoon finely chopped or creamed garlic

1/2 cup dry white wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc

1/2 cup chicken broth

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1/2 cup heavy cream

1 cup seedless green grapes, halved

1 tablespoon chopped fresh Italian flat-leaf parsley, for garnish

1. Season the chicken well with salt and pepper.

2. Heat the butter in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the breasts, turning once, until the chicken reaches a temperature of 160°F on an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast, 12 to 15 minutes. Remove the chicken from the skillet and tent with aluminum foil to keep warm.

3. Add the chopped garlic to the same skillet and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Stir in the wine, chicken broth, and mustard. Raise the heat and boil the liquid until reduced by half. Beat the cream into the sauce. Boil until the sauce thickens a little, 3 to 4 minutes.

4. Taste and season the sauce with salt and pepper if necessary.

5. Return the chicken breasts to the skillet with the sauce and add the grapes. Simmer gently until the chicken is heated through, 3 to 4 minutes. Do not overcook. Serve hot, garnished with a little parsley.

Serving Suggestion

This would be great with some steamed carrots tossed with lemon juice and a 5-minute packaged couscous.

TIP: To prepare garlic, first separate the cloves from the head. Then, lay the clove on the work surface and quickly press the side of the knife down on the clove with the palm of your hand. The skin will come right off. Chop the garlic lightly. For a creamy texture, add a little salt, which will make it easier to work into a puree. Press the garlic repeatedly with the blade of the knife, rubbing it against the chopping board until it forms a creamy paste.

* TIP: To see if a sauce is the right thickness, dip a spoon in the sauce and run a finger lengthwise down the back of the spoon. The sauce is thick enough when your finger draws a clean stripe, without the sauce seeping over the edges.

Tarragon Chicken Breasts

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

  •   SOMETHING SPECIAL

Tarragon, in discreet amounts, can be used to season tomatoes and salad dressings, and it goes especially well with chicken. Serve this dish with seasoned rice and fresh spinach, or Italian Green Beans with Tomatoes (page 165).

4 medium boneless skinless chicken breasts, tenderloins removed, or if the breasts are more than 10 ounces each, use only 2 and slice them in half horizontally, pounded to an even thickness

Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 teaspoons finely chopped garlic (2 medium cloves)

3/4 cup fresh or thawed frozen tiny pearl onions

1/2 cup dry white wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc

1 1/2 teaspoons dried tarragon, or 2 tablespoons freshly chopped tarragon, or more, to taste

3/4 cup heavy cream

3 to 4 sprigs fresh tarragon, for garnish

1. Season the chicken well with salt and pepper.

2. Melt the butter in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the chicken in the butter, turning once, until the chicken reaches a temperature of 160°F on an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove the chicken from the skillet and tent with aluminum foil to keep warm.

3. Stir the garlic and onions into the same skillet. Cook, tossing, until tender and golden brown, about 5 minutes. Stir in the wine and tarragon. Raise the heat and boil until the liquid is reduced by half, about 3 minutes. Stir in the cream.

4. Boil until the sauce thickens again slightly. Taste and season with salt and pepper if necessary.

5. Return the chicken to the sauce and simmer gently until heated through, 3 to 4 minutes. Serve the chicken on individual plates, sliced diagonally across the breast, with some of the sauce spooned over each serving. Garnish with fresh tarragon.

Serving Suggestion

Arrange the sliced chicken on a bed of rice and vegetables. Then drizzle or spoon the sauce over and garnish with fresh tarragon.

TIP: To remove the tenderloin from each boneless breast: slide a paring knife under the tendon (the tough white strip that holds the tenderloin to the breast). Place the tenderloin, tendon down, on the cutting board. With the knife against the tendon, pull on the tendon, moving it gently from side to side with your other hand, until it pulls away.

* TIP: To make the chicken breasts even, place each chicken breast in a plastic bag or between two sheets of plastic wrap. Gently flatten with the side of a meat mallet so that the breast is the same thickness all over. Make sure you don't pound the breasts too thin. These are not cutlets; you are only assuring that the meat will cook evenly. If it gets too thin, it may tear and dry out very quickly during cooking.

Chicken Niçoise Salad with Walnuts and Blue Cheese Vinaigrette

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

  •   SOMETHING SPECIAL
  •   TAKE-A LONG MAKES 4 SERVINGS

A traditional composed niçoise salad features many small but delectable and separate components such as tomatoes, olives, and green beans, with the main focus being tuna. This is a simpler but lovely composed salad using chicken. (Of course, you can substitute tuna or salmon for the chicken, if you like.) In winter, use vine-ripened tomatoes, or leave them out if the tomatoes aren't tempting. Though it isn't at all classic, I like to add some boiled potatoes for a heartier salad.

2 boneless skinless chicken breasts

2 cups low-sodium chicken broth

Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

1/2 pound smallest green beans, tipped and tailed, or frozen baby green beans

Blue Cheese Vinaigrette (below)

4 cups mixed greens of your choice (bagged greens are fine)

1/2 English-style cucumber, washed but unpeeled, very thinly sliced

3 small ripe tomatoes, cut into wedges, seeds removed

3 hard-boiled eggs, peeled and quartered

1/2 cup oil-cured black olives

1/3 cup walnut halves, toasted

1. In a medium saucepan, poach the chicken breasts in simmering chicken broth until the chicken reaches a temperature of 160°F on an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the breast, 8 to 10 minutes. Remove the chicken from the broth, cool, and slice the breasts across the grain on the diagonal. Season with salt and pepper.

2.]

Continues...


Excerpted from Kitchen Coach by Jennifer Bushman Sallie Y. Williams Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)