Kitchen Sense: More than 600 Recipes to Make You a Great Home Cook

Kitchen Sense: More than 600 Recipes to Make You a Great Home Cook

by Mitchell Davis
     
 

Imagine if everything you needed to know to be a great home cook were contained between the covers of a single volume. There’d be new twists on cozy favorites like Macaroni and Cheese with Buttermilk Fried Onions and Crumbled Bacon, classic stews such as Chicken Paprikash, Asian-inspired dishes like Chilled Soba Salad, and all-American staples such as juicy…  See more details below

Overview

Imagine if everything you needed to know to be a great home cook were contained between the covers of a single volume. There’d be new twists on cozy favorites like Macaroni and Cheese with Buttermilk Fried Onions and Crumbled Bacon, classic stews such as Chicken Paprikash, Asian-inspired dishes like Chilled Soba Salad, and all-American staples such as juicy hamburgers hot off the grill. There would be reliable, fundamental recipes for basics, including rice (white, yellow, basmati, jasmine, and brown) and vinaigrette (French, Italian, creamy, and others), along with countless creative variations. There would be boxes packed with time-saving tips and useful information on topics ranging from cleaning leafy greens to putting up jams and pickles. There’d be advice for mailing baked goods and pointers for making pan sauces. Each recipe would include not just a list of ingredients but also accurate cooking times, notes for advance prep, and specifics on how to store (and reheat or recycle) leftovers. In short, there’d be kitchen sense. And now there is.

In Kitchen Sense, renowned food authority Mitchell Davis provides more than 600 of his inviting, foolproof recipes along with the guidance you need to become a terrific home cook. If you already are one, you’ll find plenty of dishes to add to your repertoire. Because so much great American home cooking is inspired by this country’s unprecedented infusion of international ingredients, techniques, and preparations, Davis’s enticing collection takes its cues from far and wide, combining recipes from across the globe to create a true melting pot of flavors.

Written with flair by a true scholar of food who enjoys cooking and eating everything, from the simplest down-home cooking to the most sophisticated international cuisine, and crammed with informed, lively, passionate opinions, Kitchen Sense is like cooking alongside the Italian-Midwestern-Thai-Hungarian-Mexican-Southern-French-Israeli-Yankee-Indian grandmother you never had.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
A labor of culinary love is evident from beginning to end in this thorough and inspiring collection of recipes written by Davis, a professor of food studies at New York University and on staff at the James Beard Foundation. Chapters are arranged by subject (such as "Grains," "Poultry" and "Meat") and include enticing and well-explained dishes that run the gourmet gamut from American comfort foods such as Macaroni and Cheese to ethnic fare such as Shu Mai (dim sum dumplings) and Pastitsio. Baked goods include Scones, Eggplant Focaccia, and Lavender Cookies. Useful features include "Kitchen Sense" (concise highlighted boxes covering such topics as party planning, ingredient measuring and artichoke trimming); advance prep and leftover tips, which accompany recipes; and an enlightening section on how to read recipes. Even with the noticeable absence of illustrations, this is a timeless and solid collection cooks of all levels will want within easy reach in the kitchen. (June) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal - Library Journal
Davis is the director of communications at the James Beard Foundation and the author of two other cookbooks, including The Mensch Chef. His ambitious new book offers dozens of recipes both classic and contemporary, from Chicken Salad and Fris e aux Lardons to My Mother's Breaded Sole and Cod in the Basque Style. Davis has an appealing style, and he includes a lot of information on various culinary topics, but this is a crowded field, and many of the recipes are familiar. The huge Gourmet Cookbook, for example, with 1000-plus recipes, covers much of the same ground and more, and Mark Bittman's big How To Cook Everything: Simple Recipes for Good Food remains ever popular. And one caveat--Davis provides information on both advance prep and leftovers, but some of the recommended storing times seem a bit long. For larger collections. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781400049066
Publisher:
Crown Publishing Group
Publication date:
06/27/2006
Pages:
528
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 9.40(h) x 1.60(d)

Read an Excerpt

Kitchen Sense

More than 600 Recipes to Make You a Great Home Cook
By Mitchell Davis

Clarkson Potter

Copyright © 2006 Mitchell Davis
All right reserved.

ISBN: 1400049067

Southwestern Baked Beans with Chorizo, Poblanos, and Orange
A recipe from Kitchen Sense by Mitchell Davis
These unusually flavored baked beans have a rich, creamy texture and delicate orange flavor that blends surprisingly well with the chorizo and spices. I just love them. Be sure to use a fresh (raw) Mexican chorizo, not cured, smoked Spanish chorizo--the flavor will be good either way, but the Spanish chorizo ends up very dry.
Ingredients:
Makes about 8 cups, enough for 8 servings
• 2 cups small white beans (1 pound), such as navy, soldier, Great Northern, cannellini, or baby lima beans
• 1 pound fresh (raw) Mexican chorizo or other spicy sausage, cut into 11⁄2-inch pieces
• 1 large white or yellow onion, chopped
• 2 garlic cloves, minced
• 2 dark green poblano chiles, seeded and diced
• 1 or 2 jalapeño or serrano chiles, seeded and finely chopped
• 3 tablespoons orange juice concentrate
• 1-1⁄2 teaspoons kosher salt
• 1⁄4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
• 1 bunch fresh cilantro, chopped (about 1⁄3 cup)
To Prepare:
In a large, deep ovenproof pot with a lid or in a slow-cooker, combine the beans, chorizo, onion, garlic, poblanos, jalapeños, orange juice concentrate, salt, andblack pepper. Stir in 41⁄2 cups water. Cover the pot, set in the oven, and turn the temperature to 250 degrees farenheit, or switch the slow-cooker on to low. Cook for 8 hours or until the beans are soft but still hold their shape. Remove from the oven or turn off the slow-cooker. Let the beans cool at room temperature. As they sit they will absorb any excess liquid. Stir in the cilantro before serving.
Total time: 8 hours
Advance Prep I find the beans are actually best if they are made the day before and reheated (on the stove or in the oven) before serving.
Leftovers The beans will keep for two weeks in the fridge or can be frozen for several months. Reheat leftovers on the stove, in the oven, or in a microwave.

Continues...

Excerpted from Kitchen Sense by Mitchell Davis Copyright © 2006 by Mitchell Davis. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Meet the Author

Mitchell Davis is vice president and director of communications at the James Beard Foundation. He is the author of The Mensch Chef and Cook Something, the cowriter of Foie Gras, and a contributor to magazines such as GQ and Food & Wine. Davis is also an adjunct professor and Ph.D. candidate in New York University’s food studies program. He lives in New York City.

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