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Kitchen (K'ich'in)
     

Kitchen (K'ich'in)

4.8 9
by Yoshimoto
 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9788937403170
Publication date:
01/28/1999
Edition description:
New Edition

Customer Reviews

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Kitchen (K'ich'in) 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
cute and quirky
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Never expected to read a book quiet like this. Its full of simple texts but overflowing with complex emotions. A book have never affected me this much. It's magical and realistic at the same time--who can resist that? Ones you read this, you'd see life in a more different way. Even the title is attractive--Kitchen!
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Kitchen' might be largely based on the grief after the death of loved ones, but it is because of this theme that the book is comforting. The narrator's focus is on the things that make life worth living even during the darkest times: good food, family, love, and hope. She reassures us that though she will continue to encounter hardships during her lifetime, she will always triumph and come through the trials as a stronger and wiser woman.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When my friend Mini sent me this gift, I wanted to immediately loose myself in the pages. I kept thinking it was truly a book I would want to read all in one sitting. I wanted to curl up on a couch and have my two cats sleeping at my feet. How right I was. Once I started reading, (my husband sound asleep upstairs, cats sleeping at my feet, and the house deathly quiet except for the quiet humming of the refrigerator), I was immediately drawn into Mikage Sakurai's world. Banana Yoshimoto uses luscious descriptions of food and kitchens. She describes people and places with such poignancy, you truly feel connected to them. Her thoughts burst onto each page with such honesty, you cannot help but fall in love with her innocent, charming writing style. There are life and death issues in 'Kitchen,' we can all relate to. Her evocative writing will fill you with nostalgia for some of the cooking spaces you have perhaps left behind. Mostly I love my grandmother's kitchen best. The familiar creak of the oven door, the scooting sound of the chairs as we sit for a cup of tea, and the racks of cookbooks patiently waiting on the shelves. To imagine this kitchen without my grandmother, is to imagine the entire house without a soul, without love, and without peace. When we almost lost my grandmother once to a heart attack, I stood in her kitchen and felt the emptiness. I was not ready to loose her, and I believe I never will be. This is the emotion Mikage feels as she sleeps on the floor in her grandmother's kitchen. After loosing her grandmother, Mikage is lost lonely and depressed. Her soul longs for the comfort of another soul who can understand her torment. She feels as though death surrounds her and she cannot escape. For a time she finds happiness with Yuichi, who knew her grandmother well. He is living with his mother Eriko. Mikage goes to live with them until she can learn to handle her numbing emotions. Yuichi's girlfriend is not impressed, even though the relationship is purely platonic on the surface. Deep within their souls they are soon to become twins, bearing the scars of a common life experience. Banana Yoshimoto's writing is fresh, real and casts a spell on the reader. I would have preferred the book to end on page 105. She does truly seize hold of your heart and I wanted the book to either end or I wanted one more chapter in place of Moonlight Shadow. I found the book did not belong with the beautiful yet somewhat unfinished story of Yuichi and Mikage. I think you will agree. In fact, I suggest that when you get to page 105, you close the book and come back later to read the second story. I find her writing to be most inspirational when she has fully developed her characters. In the future, I hope she will write one story per book and make them as memorable as Kitchen. To truly appreciate this book, you must love food and kitchens, that is the magic. There are other issues in this book, but the kitchen is the true focus.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In her home country she is both respected and diregarded equally. some say that her writing style ammounts to little more than a literary translation of shojo manga (comics for young girls), but it can't be denied that Yoshimoto Banana has the voice of her generation. A detatched and distant voice it is, but well worth listeneing to. The details in the book are scarce but what is there feels like a dream would read if you could read in a dream. Banana's writing is very much lyrical prose about the immediate and the sensual, and the main character is a spirit who drifts through the pages. A wonderful story about a woman lost of purpose and caught inbetween indifference and passion.