Kitten Red, Yellow, Blue

Overview

Sixteen calico kittens — the number of colors in a crayon box.
Their mother, Sophie, knows one from another...but how do you think Mrs. Tuttle tells those kittens apart?
Peter Catalanotto's sequel to his Matthew A.B.C. and Daisy 1, 2, 3 invites long looking, counting, and laughing!

After placing the red kitten with Dave the firefighter and the blue kitten with ...

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Overview

Sixteen calico kittens — the number of colors in a crayon box.
Their mother, Sophie, knows one from another...but how do you think Mrs. Tuttle tells those kittens apart?
Peter Catalanotto's sequel to his Matthew A.B.C. and Daisy 1, 2, 3 invites long looking, counting, and laughing!

After placing the red kitten with Dave the firefighter and the blue kitten with Francine the police officer, Mrs. Tuttle finds homes for fourteen other colorful kittens.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
And youngsters can master their colors thanks to Kitten Red, Yellow, Blue, the third in Peter Catalanotto's captivating concept books (Matthew A. B. C.; Daisy 1, 2, 3). Here 16 calico kittens each wear a unique colored collar that matches up with an appropriate owner. For instance, "Red kitten rescues with Dave, the firefighter," and "Purple kitten performs with Zack, the musician," who sports a purple Mohawk. Catalanotto uses a primarily gray backdrop to accent the featured color. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Introducing young children to a variety of colors will be enjoyable with this amusing story about a fun-loving litter of kittens. When Mrs. Tuttle's cat, Sophia, has sixteen calico kittens, she's left with the arduous task of finding homes for all of them. After seeing how cute the kittens are, everyone in the neighborhood comes to her rescue and decides to adopt the kittens. So, one by one, the kittens are placed with their new owners—a variety of workers from the community, including a firefighter, a construction worker, a landscaper, a karate teacher, a chef, a ballerina, a pediatrician, and a crossing guard. As each kitten is adopted by its new owner, the author cleverly matches the kitten's collar to a corresponding color in the worker's uniform or equipment. Once all of the kittens find new homes, Mrs. Tuttle surprises Sophia with a reunion party, which features her sixteen kittens dressed in their colorful collars accompanied by matching balloons. What's so ingenious about this book's presentation is that the author uses a gray watercolor wash to illustrate each scene with just a splash of the featured color to capture the reader's attention. With minimal text and simple illustrations, this book effectively introduces young readers to a variety of different colors, as well as teaches them about various community workers. This wonderful book is a perfect companion to the author's previous bestsellers, Daisy 1, 2, 3 and Matthew A, B, C. This is part of the "A+ Books" series. 2005, Richard Jackson Books/Atheneum Books for Young Readers, Ages 2 to 5.
—Debra Briatico
School Library Journal
K-Gr 1-Sophia, a tabby cat, has 16 kittens. Using different-colored collars for each one, the author introduces both colors and community helpers: "Teal kitten cures with Louann, the pediatrician" and "Chartreuse kitten directs with Celia, the crossing guard." After their busy days, the kittens are reunited with an anxious Sophia during a colorful party. Catalanotto's sepia-like pictures are highlighted with the color introduced. For example, the color tan appears in the grocery bag and in the clerk's uniform. "Rust" appears along the pipes that Tony the plumber is repairing as well as in his shirt. The kittens also have touches of color. The art has a lot of child appeal, as do the popular concepts, and the text is bold and easy to read. A book of high interest to teachers and children.-Corrina Austin, Locke's Public School, St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Named for colors in a box of crayons, 16 kittens pair off with as many community workers and residents in this ingenious cousin to Matthew A.B.C. (2002) and Daisy 1, 2, 3 (2003). Catalanotto lines up Sophia the cat's calico offspring and then sends them away wearing colored collars to help new owners in their own way. Red kitten looks on as Dave the red-hatted firefighter contemplates a dog stuck in a tree, for instance; Green kitten poses for Paul the landscaper's verdant topiary; Orange kitten demonstrates a jump shot for Chelsea the basketball player; Turquoise kitten queasily accompanies Audrey the pilot; and, in a bit of cleverly indirect product placement, Brown kitten's line of work involves delivering parcels. To brighten the color highlights, the artist renders each lively, humorous scene in neutral tones, and closes with a chromatic blast, as the kittens reunite, with confetti and identifying balloons, for a parental visit. Young fans of Martin's Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? (1983, 1992) and its myriad cousins will love the expanded range of color choices here. (Picture book. 4-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689865626
  • Publisher: Atheneum/Richard Jackson Books
  • Publication date: 2/1/2005
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 981,750
  • Age range: 2 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.70 (w) x 10.26 (h) x 0.38 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Catalanotto has written fifteen books for children, including Monkey & Robot, Question Boy Meets Little Miss Know-It-All, Ivan the Terrier, Matthew A.B.C., and Emily’s Art, of which School Library Journal said in a starred review, “Whether viewed from afar or up close, this creative and heartfelt book is a masterpiece.” Peter has illustrated more than forty books, among them several collaborations with George Ella Lyon. Their Mother to Tigers received a starred review in School Library Journal and was one of the New York Public Library’s 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing in 2003. He lives in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

Peter Catalanotto has written fifteen books for children, including Monkey & Robot, Question Boy Meets Little Miss Know-It-All, Ivan the Terrier, Matthew A.B.C., and Emily’s Art, of which School Library Journal said in a starred review, “Whether viewed from afar or up close, this creative and heartfelt book is a masterpiece.” Peter has illustrated more than forty books, among them several collaborations with George Ella Lyon. Their Mother to Tigers received a starred review in School Library Journal and was one of the New York Public Library’s 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing in 2003. He lives in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

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