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The Knight Who Took All Day
     

The Knight Who Took All Day

by James Mayhew
 

There once was a knight who THOUGHT he was brave and fearless and handsome...and a princess who discovered she didn't need rescuing.

A dashing knight decides it's time to impress the golden-haired princess. All he needs is a dragon to show off his marvelous talents. One day, a huge dragon appears on the horizon, smoke pouring from his nostrils. Immediately, the

Overview

There once was a knight who THOUGHT he was brave and fearless and handsome...and a princess who discovered she didn't need rescuing.

A dashing knight decides it's time to impress the golden-haired princess. All he needs is a dragon to show off his marvelous talents. One day, a huge dragon appears on the horizon, smoke pouring from his nostrils. Immediately, the knight orders his squire to fetch his armor. But will he get dressed in time--or is this knight more interested in appearances than action? After much waiting, the golden-haired princess decides to tame that fire-breathing beast herself!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Mayhew's (Boy) frolicking adventure features a self-infatuated knight whose longing to impress a princess sends him scouring the country for a dragon to fight. Visual humor abounds: for example, in a spread that illustrates the knight's incompetence, he rides past a dragon's foot, mistaking it for a tree, peers into a dragon's mouth, thinking it's a cave, and stands on a dragon's nose, believing it's a volcano. The accompanying text concludes, "He could not find a single dragon." Italics, capital letters and bold font highlight particular words, lending a tongue-in-cheek tone to the text, while crayon-and-watercolor illustrations of rolling hills, wispy clouds and slender brown trunks with leafy treetops peppered with red apples playfully evoke children's artwork. The humor heightens when one day a dragon arrives in town, wreaking havoc. The knight, "delighted" that his opportunity for glory has come, sends the squire for his armor, then fusses repeatedly: "It has no plume! Fetch me one immediately. And a cloak to match!" A cutaway spread captures the chaos reigning in the castle: the knight primps, the squire runs up and down stairs, the dragon hovers, breathing fire and meanwhile, the princess calmly takes care of things herself. A not entirely unexpected twist of events provides a fitting conclusion for this jolly fairytale. Ages 3-5. (Oct.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2-A pompous knight who sets out to impress a princess by fighting a dragon is foiled by the fact that he can't find one. As the comical fellow searches fruitlessly, Mayhew's descriptive, watercolor cartoons show readers what the clueless knight has missed. This fun and interactive technique is used successfully throughout the story. The search ends when a dragon arrives on the scene and endangers the village and the castle. The happy knight orders his beleaguered squire to get the proper equipment and accessories to help him look the part of the vanquishing hero, including his shiniest armor, a long flowing cloak, and a peacock plume in his visor. When he is finally ready to do battle, the princess has already tamed the beast and there is no danger. This is no surprise to readers who have seen her getting ready all along. In a final twist, she marries the squire and they fly off on its back "and lived happily ever after." The major characters are given their own font within the text and large type with boldface is used for important words. This entertaining take on an old premise provides a good but not overbearing lesson, while still being a good read, especially aloud. Other books of this ilk include Robert Munsch's The Paper Bag Princess (Annick, 1986) and Katherine Paterson's The King's Equal (HarperCollins, 1992).-Catherine Callegari, San Antonio Public Library, TX Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Mayhew's irresistibly cheery pictures and puckish font play live up to the promise of this delicious title. A knight longs to impress the princess with his magnificence, but she's uninterested. He searches long and hard for a dragon to fight, but when one finally turns up, he spends his time sending his squire up and down the 101 steps to the armory for just the right stuff ("I need my SHINING armor, with the CURLY flourishes!"). By the time he's ready, he discovers the princess has tamed the dragon with a crown of flowers and the local children are riding on its back. Appropriately medieval royalty, peasants and animals dash about in these pages, all rosily painted. In the end, the princess marries the squire and they go off with the dragon as their steed to see the world "and lived happily ever after!" (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439748292
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
10/01/2005
Edition description:
First American Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.48(w) x 11.28(h) x 0.11(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

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