Knight's Castle

Knight's Castle

3.6 8
by Edward Eager, N. M. Bodecker
     
 

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If the old toy soldier hadn't come to life, Roger would never have discovered the magic.
     And that would never have happened if he and his sister, Ann, hadn't been sent to stay with their bossy cousins for the summer. And that wouldn't have happened at all if their father hadn't gotten sick and gone into the…  See more details below

Overview

If the old toy soldier hadn't come to life, Roger would never have discovered the magic.
     And that would never have happened if he and his sister, Ann, hadn't been sent to stay with their bossy cousins for the summer. And that wouldn't have happened at all if their father hadn't gotten sick and gone into the hospital.
     But all of that did happen, and now Roger, his sister, and their cousins find themselves in a bygone world of chivalry and knighthood, of Robin Hood and Ivanhoe. In this knightly realm they can make a difference—and perhaps even save the person they most need to save—if only they are smart and brave enough, if only they are true to their hearts.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Nancy Partridge
Roger and Ann, ages 11 and 8, live with their understanding parents in a nice house, in a pleasant town, having a very good childhood indeed, until their father is diagnosed with a mysterious illness one day in early summer. They have to forgo their plans for a family trip to the Rocky Mountains and go stay with their cousins, bossy Eliza and aloof Jack, in Baltimore, Maryland. Roger brings along his set of two hundred and fifty-six model soldiers, including the one he calls the old one, who happens to be magic. Once they get to Baltimore, all kinds of magic adventure await the four children and their toy knight's castle. The action-filled plot is told with such humor, gentleness, and great storytelling that many young readers will stay up late reading under the covers, unable to put it down. Edward Eager's tremendous love for and understanding of children rings out loud and clear in this new edition of a wonderful book from the 'fifties. 1999 (orig,
From the Publisher

"A delicious spoof." 
Saturday Review

"A priceless mixture of old and new. . . . May even lure readers who thought they were beyond the fairy-tale age." 
New York Herald Tribune Books

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547892580
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/31/1999
Series:
Tales of Magic , #3
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
208
Lexile:
860L (what's this?)
File size:
3 MB
Age Range:
7 - 10 Years

Meet the Author

EDWARD EAGER (1911–1964) worked primarily as a playwright and lyricist. It wasn't until 1951, while searching for books to read to his young son, Fritz, that he began writing children's stories. His classic Tales of Magic series started with the best-selling Half Magic, published in 1954. In each of his books he carefully acknowledges his indebtedness to E. Nesbit, whom he considered the best children's writer of all time—"so that any child who likes my books and doesn't know hers may be led back to the master of us all."
 

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Knight's Castle 3.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
HomeSchoolBookReview More than 1 year ago
Edward Eager, who lived from 1911 to 1964, was a playwright and lyricist. In 1951, while searching for books to read to his young son Fritz, he began writing children's stories similar to the fantasy books of Edith Nesbit. In Knight's Castle, the father of Roger, age eleven, and Ann, age eight, is ill and has to cancel their summer family vacation to the Rocky Mountains so that he can go for an operation to a hospital in Baltimore, MD, where the family moves in with their Aunt Katherine and their two boring cousins, Eliza, age eleven, and Jack, age twelve. Roger brings along his set of two hundred and fifty-six model soldiers, including the one he calls "The Old One." The children end up having an exciting summer after all when this old toy soldier comes to life and they are magically transported back to the days of Wilfred of Ivanhoe, Rebecca, Rowena, Robin Hood, Prince John, and King Richard, taking part in the siege of Torquilstone. Those who object to any mention of "magic" in stories will not like this book; however, it is not the magic of witchcraft but of "fairy tales." I enjoyed the book. The only objectionable elements that I found were references to where the children were allowed to drink wine, the fact that in one of their times back in Ivanhoe's day the guards were smoking cigarettes, and one occasion when the girls had a party where they talked about boys and danced the Lindy. Also, a few common euphemisms are found (golly, gee, gosh, and darn are each used once). Aside from these minor flaws, the story is quite entertaining. I have always wanted to read Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe, and this book increased my desire even more. Eager's other books include Half Magic, where Jane, Mark, Katharine, and Martha suddenly find themselves involved in a series of extraordinary adventures after Jane discovers an ordinary-looking coin that seems to grant wishes; its sequel, Magic By The Lake, which contain the further adventures of Mark, Katherine, Jane, and Martha, who find their source of magic in a lake near which they are spending the summer after Mark captures an ancient turtle that seems to have extraordinary powers; Time Garden (another sequel?), in which four cousins spending a summer in a house by the sea discover a magic thyme garden from which they embark on a number of adventures in time; Magic or Not? in which a family moves to Connecticut and twins James and Laura make new friends with whom they begin a series of unusual adventures after discovering an old well that seems to be magic in their backyard; Well-Wishers, in which six children relate their experiences with an unpredictable old wishing well that involves them in some magical adventures during an eventful autumn; and Seven-Day Magic, in which a seven-day book of magic proves to be fractious for five children, who must learn the book's rules and tame its magic.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have to admit that it was a very creative story, but there were too many thus's and thee's. Most of the time it didn't make any sense.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Roger and Ann were looking forward to a vacation at the Rocky Mountains when, all of a sudden, their father gets ill. They had to fly to their bossy cousins' house. They end up being friends and go on magical adventures together. For instance, they go to bed in a normal bed and wake up on top of a plateau. If you want to find out what other adventures they go on check out this book from a library near you. I liked this book because it has a lot of magic and a bunch of adventure.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Knight's Castle is an AWESOME book!! I'm thirteen and a good reader, but I STILL love it!!! Someone should DEFINITLEY write more books like that!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful imaginative book. Edward Eager does a great job making realistic characters and combining fairy tales with nonsense.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wonderful, a great book you don't want to put down. What a great writer, all his books are perfect for kids like me.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The beggining is OKAY, but as the story 'develops' it just makes you want to stop reading it. I won't be recommending this book to anyone soon.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book has very bad language and explicit content