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Knight's Move

Overview

First published in 1923, Knight's Move is a collection of articles and short critical pieces that Viktor Shklovsky, no doubt the most original literary critic and theoretician of the twentieth century, wrote for the newspaper The Life of Art between 1919 and 1921. With his usual epigrammatic, acerbic wit and genius, Shklovsky pillories the bad writers, artists, and critics of his time, especially those who used art as a political or social tool. And at no time is Shklovsky better than when he insists with ...

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Overview

First published in 1923, Knight's Move is a collection of articles and short critical pieces that Viktor Shklovsky, no doubt the most original literary critic and theoretician of the twentieth century, wrote for the newspaper The Life of Art between 1919 and 1921. With his usual epigrammatic, acerbic wit and genius, Shklovsky pillories the bad writers, artists, and critics of his time, especially those who used art as a political or social tool. And at no time is Shklovsky better than when he insists with indignation and outrage that "Art has always been free of life. Its flag has never reflected the color of the flag that flies over the city fortress." As fresh and revolutionary today as they were when written nearly a century ago, these pieces promise to infuriate an English-speaking readership as much as the Russian one of the 1920s.

Dalkey Archive Press

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
this masterful set of essays' -Publishers Weekly

Dalkey Archive Press

Library Journal
Literary critic and theoretician Shklovsky (Theory of Prose) was a leading figure in the Russian Formalist movement during the 1920s. He had a profound effect on the writing of his time and on the future development of other schools of critical theory, which grew out of a reaction to (or a further development of) Formalism. This book gathers 37 of Shklovsky's short pieces, which first appeared in the newspaper Life of Art between 1919 and 1921. Most of the work centers on his often heated feelings about the nature of art and the need for independence in art. He also writes, in an evocative and harrowing manner, of revolution and the effects of war. For readers who lack context for Shklovsky's agenda or some understanding of the history of Russian literature and politics in the early 20th century, many of these pieces will read as disjointed sketches, a mix of rant and nightmare. However, for scholars and students of Shklovsky and his times, this translation provides wider access to the work of a pivotal figure in Russian literary theory and, as such, is recommended for academic libraries.-Neal Wyatt, Chesterfield Cty. P.L., VA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781564783851
  • Publisher: Dalkey Archive Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/2005
  • Series: Dalkey Archive Scholarly Series
  • Pages: 143
  • Sales rank: 1,091,771
  • Product dimensions: 5.02 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.49 (d)

Meet the Author

Viktor Borisovich Shklovsky, (born Jan. 24 [Jan. 12, Old Style], 1893, St. Petersburg, Russia—died Dec. 8, 1984, Moscow), Russian literary critic and novelist. He was a major voice of Formalism, a critical school that had great influence in Russian lite

Dalkey Archive Press

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Table of Contents

Translator's Introduction vii
Knight's Move
First Preface 3
Bundle
Second Preface 5
Setting the Frame
Petersburg During the Blockade 9
Regarding Art and Revolution
"Ullya, Ullya, Martians" 21
Pounding Nails with a Samovar 25
Gooseberry Jam 28
A Flag Is Snapping 31
The Appeasers 34
Drama and Mass Productions 36
Papa-That's an Alarm Clock 39
Collective Creativity 42
In My Own Defense 46
Regarding Psychological Footlights 48
Speaking in a Loud Voice 51
The Visual Arts
Regarding "The Great Metalworker" 54
Space in Painting and the Suprematists 58
Regarding Texture and Counter-Reliefs 65
The Monument to the Third International 69
Ivan Puni 71
The Law of Inequality
Parallels in Tolstoy 73
Contemporary Theater
Embellished Tolstoy 79
Folk Comedy and The First Distiller 83
The Art of the Circus 86
With Regard to Tastes 89
Apropos of King Lear 92
The Old and the New 96
Regarding Merezhkovsky 98
The Comic and the Tragic 101
Shoeing a Flea 107
Eating Fish by Cutting It with a Knife 111
A Thousand Herrings 112
Completing the Frame
I and My Coat 115
A Rock on a String
Rollercoaster 120
Coffins Back 122
A Boxer Down for the Count 124
A Free Port 126
Afterword
The Tsar's Kitchen 130
Translator's Notes 133
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