The Knights of the Black and White (Templar Trilogy Series #1)

( 26 )

Overview

A brother of the Order-a medieval secret society uniting noble families in a sacred bond-Sir Hugh de Payens has emerged from the First Crusade a broken man seeking to dedicate his life to God. But the Order has other plans for him: to uncover a deadly secret that could shatter the very might of the Church itself.

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Knights of the Black and White

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Overview

A brother of the Order-a medieval secret society uniting noble families in a sacred bond-Sir Hugh de Payens has emerged from the First Crusade a broken man seeking to dedicate his life to God. But the Order has other plans for him: to uncover a deadly secret that could shatter the very might of the Church itself.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Veteran of eight Arthurian novels (The Lance Thrower, etc.), Whyte turns to the Crusades with this tedious first volume of a Knights Templar trilogy. In 1088, young knight Hugh de Payens is initiated into the secret Order of the Rebirth of Sion, who believe the Christian Church to be "an invalid creation... built upon a myth." Founded by Jewish families fleeing the Romans, the Order believes that the truth about Jesus and the founding of Christianity lie buried beneath the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. When Pope Urban calls for a Holy Crusade to liberate Jerusalem from the Muslims, the Order-given to interminable monologues-sees an opportunity to perhaps retrieve those ancient documents and sends Sir Hugh and others to join the Crusaders, yakking the whole way. After the bloody fall of Jerusalem, Sir Hugh establishes a new order of warrior monks as a cover for the excavation of the Temple Mount, and the race is on to find the hidden treasure, if it exists, before their activities are discovered. This tepid Templar foray will be crowded out at the gates. (Aug.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780515143331
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 6/26/2007
  • Series: Templar Trilogy Series , #1
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 768
  • Sales rank: 533,652
  • Product dimensions: 4.36 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 1.81 (d)

Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 26 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2006

    A fine historical thriller

    Jewish families escaping the wrath of the Christian conquest of the Roman Empire create a secret society, the Order of the Rebirth of Sion, whose long term objective is to reveal the truth about the Church that they believe is built on lies and 'an invalid creation¿. Over the centuries they hide, but prepare and wait patiently for the opportunity to destroy the myth. Late in the eleventh century, the chance arrives when Pope Urban calls for a Crusade to take back the Holy Land from the Infidels because the order believes that the proof is hidden under the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.-------------- Joining the Christian army is sworn members of the Order of the Rebirth of Sion like Sir Hugh de Payens and Stephen St. Clair. During the effort to free Jerusalem from the Muslims, men like these two seek entry into the Temple Mount where they plan to excavate. The violent war is a cover for competing western groups who either want to prove a sham or destroy the evidence, if any exists while the Muslims block their path into one of the holiest shrines. ---------------------- Conceptually the first book of the latest Templar tales contains a terrific theme as various hostile sides converge on the temple Mount. However, the story line is slowed down by obloquies, soliloquies and colloquies that ironically provide a key feel for the conditions of the First Crusaders but also lacks action. Still the Knights Templar crowd will enjoy the newest entry that enthusiastically illuminates what has become an inundated topic.---------------- Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2008

    Yea, like what that first guy said: 'A fine historical thriller'

    First, read the book. Then, read the above mentioned review. It only makes sense afterwards. I have the same comments as the other reviewers 'slow, hard to get through the pages, but it picked up at the end'. I was suprised to see it was a trilogy 'just found out that on this site', but not excited, as I can't see how it could hold myy interest after dragging me through this first portion. There is nothing exceptional in the character develpment that you would want to see them in another book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2007

    Could have been better!

    I wanted SO badly to really love this book....but, to be honest, the first half was so boring and slow! It took a long, long time before I even started caring about the characters. It did get more interesting later on. It's almost like two different writers wrote this. I enjoyed the second half and the ending, though.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 29, 2014

    Does every issue in history "really" have to be about

    Does every issue in history "really" have to be about how Jews have been mistreated and conspired against?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2013

    RESTURANTS

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  • Posted December 10, 2013

    Great Read

    I enjoyed the first novel in the Templar Knights trilogy by Jack Whyte. (So much, I am about half way through the second book.) It is a great read with historical facts that land you in the time of the Templar Knights' beginning. Mr Whyte makes all the charatcters come to life and helps you to understand the politics of that time in our history. I highly recommend this novel!

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  • Posted March 16, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Highly recommended

    This is the first book by Jack Whyte I have read and certainly look forward to reading more of his books. I was very impressed by the way Mr. Whyte took the time to put history of his main characters throughout the book, but not over due it to where you are bored with it's contents. From the very beginning you are involved in the main characters lifestyles during the years around 1090 to 1199. From that point on all 511 pages are worth every word written.

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  • Posted March 2, 2009

    Everyone to their own taste said the man who kissed the cowmp

    I read the reviews of others and I totally disagree. Jack Whyte is a master writer. His plots are brillent and his writing is entertaining, informative, and beautiful. I love his characters and this series about the Templers is excellent. I, frankly, am disappointed that there will only be three books in this series. I have loved his books over the years and can't wait until he writes another. I know this is only my opinion but I wanted people to know that I feel he is worth reading and I think his research and details are terrific -- You go Jack

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2007

    Paul a Gentile?

    I've been a student of theology for most of my life, having attended private christian school since 1st grade. I've memorized much of the Bible. Yet, I've come to trust Jack Whyte's research and accuracy so much that when I saw him siting St. Paul as a Gentile I nearly dropped the book! St. Paul was one of the leading Jewish pharisees of his time until he was converted to Christianity. Although it's true he then headed up the growth of the church and was effectively the driving force behind converting gentiles to Christianity 'it was considered a jewish cult before then' he was a Jew's Jew genetically and in his heart. I'm enjoying the book, but the inaccuracy certainly breaks the suspension of disbelief. I'm amazed this important of a factual error made it past his editors and Whyte, himself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2006

    Where's Publius Varrus?

    I haven't finished this book yet, but since Jack has his characters insist (twice so far) that the Apostle Paul was a gentile and not a Jew, how much else did he get wrong? I'll write a full review when I complete the book, but I must say ... as of page 273, I find the characters flat and colorless (this from the author who gave us that sterling, unforgettable Publius). Thus far,the overall read is rather tedious.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2011

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    Posted March 23, 2011

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    Posted November 17, 2011

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    Posted April 8, 2009

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    Posted January 10, 2011

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    Posted November 23, 2009

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    Posted August 24, 2010

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    Posted June 3, 2011

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