Knowing How to Know: A Practical Philosophy in the Sufi Tradition

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780863040764
  • Publisher: Ishk Book Service
  • Publication date: 3/28/2000
  • Pages: 343
  • Product dimensions: 5.48 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.09 (d)

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2001

    Agree or disagree, much food for thought ...

    The word 'Sufi' still elicits a range of reactions from the mystified to the parochial to the impractical, and you will likely view this book accordingly, unless you actually read it. In a curious way, it assumes that you are seeking an understanding of your motivations, and of life in general, as if 'Sufi' were an everyday preoccupation. Yet, without attempting to define 'Sufi' in any direct way, 'Knowing How to Know' will likely challenge your assumptions regarding most any approach to knowledge that you have ever undertaken. If this book is to be believed, any real increase in understanding requires fundamental changes in characteristic patterns of our thinking, patterns of which we are typically unaware. However, the complexity of our minds means that each of us has unique needs that must be satisfied before effective changes in our thinking can occur. The process is not hit or miss, but involves human operations as precise as any required in the physical sciences, including all of the elements of love, action, and attention to which we are appropriately disposed. 'Knowing How to Know' lays out, in very stark terms, just how we might hope to apply these necessary requirements to aquire deeper, broader, and higher knowledge in our own lives.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2001

    Agree or disagree, much food for thought ...

    The word 'Sufi' still elicits a range of reactions from the mystified to the parochial to the impractical, and you will likely view this book accordingly, unless you actually read it. In a curious way, it assumes that you are seeking an understanding of your motivations, and of life in general, as if 'Sufi' were an everyday preoccupation. Yet, without attempting to define 'Sufi' in any direct way, 'Knowing How to Know' will likely challenge your assumptions regarding most any approach to knowledge that you have ever undertaken. If this book is to be believed, any real increase in understanding requires fundamental changes in characteristic patterns of our thinking, patterns of which we are typically unaware. However, the complexity of our minds means that each of us has unique needs that must be satisfied before effective changes in our thinking can occur. The process is not hit or miss, but involves human operations as precise as any required in the physical sciences, including all of the elements of love, action, and attention to which we are appropriately disposed. 'Knowing How to Know' lays out, in very stark terms, just how we might hope to apply these necessary requirements to aquire deeper, broader, and higher knowledge in our own lives.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2001

    Assumptions Challenged

    As with many of the Shah books I've read, this one provides layers of information with every reading. It contains theoretical information on Sufi philosophy and then demonstrates/causes an experiential understanding in other sections. Not like any other book I've read before. And certainly not like any New-Age-y gibberish in many 'religious/mystical/etc.' texts. The titles for the chapters cause one to assume certain content which turns out to not be so... a demonstration of our own conditioning in some way... Buy it, read it then read it again in a few years...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2001

    Provocative journey into the human heart

    The back cover reads: 'Like an ultra-violet light shone onto the petals of flowers, it reveals patterns, normally invisible to our customary modes of thought.' This is an ideal description for the masterful collection of essays contained in Knowing how to Know. Shah describes that before learning can take place, certain conditions and essential factors must be in place. This book is a treasure-house of provocative and challenging ideas which, when studied with the appropriate measure of sincerity, can provide a foundation for further study. Idries Shah has always had a way to get unusual ideas to seep past our vigilant defences. Things are not always what they seem at first glance, as continued study of this book may demonstrate. Here is maybe his most penetrating book- one that has helped me see simple but effective barriers that keep me locked into rigid, comfortable frameworks.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2001

    Ten Easy Steps to Enlightenment, Success and Fulfillment...

    Ten Easy Steps to Enlightenment, Success and Fulfillment... ...is NOT what this book is about. So, if that¿s what you¿re in search of, you may want to look elsewhere. If, however, you¿re interested in a book that will provide you with some eye-opening insights into life on this planet, give you a totally different perspective on your own life, and also on occasion make you laugh out loud, then give this a read. This is among the last written works of Idries Shah Sayed, and was posthumously published. An ancient description of the Sufi way of life tells us that: ¿Man is destined to live a social life. His part is to be with other men. In serving Sufism he is serving the Infinite, serving himself, and serving society. He cannot cut himself off from any one of these obligations and become or remain a Sufi.¿ Knowing How To Know provides some direction on how a 21st century person who aspires to serve the Infinite, serve himself, and serve the society that he or she is a part of, might proceed in order to realize these aspirations.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 26, 2001

    Insightful

    An invaluable tool for understanding the human condition. I seem to gain new insights everytime I sit down to read a chapter.

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