BN.com Gift Guide

Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations: A Story of Economic Discovery [NOOK Book]

Overview

"What The Double Helix did for biology, David Warsh's Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations does for economics."—Boston Globe


A stimulating and inviting tour of modern economics centered on the story of one of its most important breakthroughs. In 1980, the twenty-four-year-old graduate student Paul Romer tackled one of the oldest puzzles in economics. Eight years later he solved it. This book tells the story of what has come to be called the new growth theory: the paradox ...
See more details below
Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations: A Story of Economic Discovery

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 41%)$17.95 List Price

Overview

"What The Double Helix did for biology, David Warsh's Knowledge and the Wealth of Nations does for economics."—Boston Globe


A stimulating and inviting tour of modern economics centered on the story of one of its most important breakthroughs. In 1980, the twenty-four-year-old graduate student Paul Romer tackled one of the oldest puzzles in economics. Eight years later he solved it. This book tells the story of what has come to be called the new growth theory: the paradox identified by Adam Smith more than two hundred years earlier, its disappearance and occasional resurfacing in the nineteenth century, the development of new technical tools in the twentieth century, and finally the student who could see further than his teachers.



Fascinating in its own right, new growth theory helps to explain dominant first-mover firms like IBM or Microsoft, underscores the value of intellectual property, and provides essential advice to those concerned with the expansion of the economy. Like James Gleick's Chaos or Brian Greene's The Elegant Universe, this revealing book takes us to the frontlines of scientific research; not since Robert Heilbroner's classic work The Worldly Philosophers have we had as attractive a glimpse of the essential science of economics.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Paul Krugman
I've never seen anyone write as well as Warsh about the social world of economic research, a world of brilliant, often eccentric people who bear no resemblance to the dreary suits you see discussing the economy on CNBC … If you like reading stories of high intellectual drama, if you want to know the origin of ideas that, as Keynes said, "are dangerous for good or evil," this book is for you.
— The New York Times
Library Journal
Veteran business reporter Warsh takes on the world of economic scholarship to tell the story of how the growth of human knowledge finally became incorporated into mainstream economic theory. Warsh explains that economist Paul Romer's publication of a mathematical model of economic growth in his article "Endogenous Technological Change" 20 years ago was the spur that brought the economics of knowledge to the forefront after more than two centuries of being on the hazy periphery of the profession. Warsh makes a strong case for the importance of Romer's work in redefining the traditional economic factors of production from being land, labor, and capital to being people, ideas, and things. Nevertheless, it is hard to determine an audience for Warsh's book. While everyone would benefit from understanding these new ideas, Warsh's focus is on how Romer's insight came about and not on explaining it in detail. Warsh's lengthy examination of the scholarship trailing back to Adam Smith would be tedious for most readers. This limits the book's appeal to mainly academic libraries collecting in economics.-Lawrence R. Maxted, Gannon Univ., Erie, PA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
New York Times Book Review
A fascinating journey through the world of economic thought....If you like reading stories of high intellectual drama, if you want to know the origin of ideas that, as Keynes said, 'are dangerous for good or evil,' this book is for you.— Paul Krugman
The Economist
“Warsh has written the best book of its kind since Peter Bernstein's Capital Ideas.”
Paul Krugman - New York Times Book Review
“A fascinating journey through the world of economic thought....If you like reading stories of high intellectual drama, if you want to know the origin of ideas that, as Keynes said, 'are dangerous for good or evil,' this book is for you.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393066364
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/17/2007
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 591,554
  • File size: 614 KB

Meet the Author

Former Boston Globe columnist David Warsh writes the online newsletter Economic Principals. He lives in Somerville, Massachusetts.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 The discipline 3
2 "It tells you where to carve the joints" 9
3 What is a model? how does it work? 28
4 The invisible hand and the pin factory 37
5 How the dismal science got its name 48
6 The underground river 61
7 Spillovers and other accommodations 72
8 The Keynesian revolution and the modern movement 88
9 "Mathematics is a language" 108
10 When economics went high-tech 126
11 The residual and its critics 140
12 The infinite-dimensional spreadsheet 158
13 Economists turn to rocket science, and "model" becomes a verb 166
14 New departures 179
15 "That's stupid!" 195
16 In Hyde Park 203
17 The u-turn 214
18 The keyboard, the city, and the world 228
19 Recombinations 249
20 Crazy explanations 261
21 At the ski lift 276
22 "Endogenous technological change" 289
23 Conjectures and refutations 305
24 A short history of the cost of lighting 327
25 The ultimate pin factory 343
26 The invisible revolution 370
27 Teaching economics 382
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)