Knowledge Assets: Securing Competitive Advantage in the Information Economy

Overview

It is now widely recognized that the effective management of knowledge assets is a key requirement for securing competitive advantage in the emerging information economy. Yet the physical and institutional differences between tangible assets and knowledge assets remains poorly understood. If we are to meet the challenges of the information economy, then we need a new approach to property rights based on a deeper theoretical understanding of knowledge assets.

This clear, ...

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Overview

It is now widely recognized that the effective management of knowledge assets is a key requirement for securing competitive advantage in the emerging information economy. Yet the physical and institutional differences between tangible assets and knowledge assets remains poorly understood. If we are to meet the challenges of the information economy, then we need a new approach to property rights based on a deeper theoretical understanding of knowledge assets.

This clear, accessible study provides some of the key building blocks needed for a theory of knowledge assets. Boisot develops a powerful conceptual framework—the Information-Space or I-Space—for exploring the way knowledge flows within and between organizations. This framework will enable managers and students to explore and understand how knowledge and information assets differ from physical assets, and how to deal with them at a strategic level within their organizations.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780198296072
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 9/28/1999
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 312
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 5.80 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Max Boisot is Professor of Strategic Management at ESADE in Barcelona.

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Table of Contents

Preface
1. Introduction
2. The Information Perspective
3. The Information Space (I-Space)
4. The Paradox of Value
5. Neoclassical versus Schumpeterian Orientation to Learning
6. Culture as a Knowledge Asset
7. Products, Technologies, and Organizations in the Social Learning Cycle
8. Competence and Intent
9. IT and its Impact
10. Applying the I-Space
11. Recapitulation and Conclusion
1. Introduction
2. The Information Perspective
3. The Information Space, I-Space
4. The Paradox of Value
5. Neoclassical versus Schumpeterian Orientation to Learning
6. Culture as a Knowledge Asset
7. Products, Technologies, and Organizations in the Social Learning Cycle
8. Competence and Intent
9. IT and its Impact
10. Applying the I-Space
11. Recapitulation and Conclusion

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2001

    STRONG WELL WRITTEN MASTER PIECE

    The decision to read a book, any book, is an exercise in cost-benefit-analysis, usually conducted under conditions of uncertainty (Boisot, 1998). This review strives to mitigate this uncertainty and instigate you to read it! Boisot delivers a genuine new perspective on knowledge assets quite distinct from the existing knowledge literature. First he states that knowledge is embedded in physical objects (public knowledge -like a pack of Marlboros ¿ understood as a pack of cigarettes of a certain quality and length), in documents, and in individual brains. He builds a three dimensional Information-space consisting of codification (codified ¿ uncodified), abstraction (abstract ¿ concrete), and diffusion (diffused ¿ undiffused). Plot these elements on three axes of a three dimensional rectangle and you got Boisot basic mental model. In this box (I-space) the movement of knowledge results in the Social Learning Cycle (SLC). The SLC consists of 6 phases, respectively Scanning, Problem Solving, Abstraction, Diffusion, Absorption, and Impacting. This model fundaments subsequently the rest of the book in which he illustrates the value of knowledge, two learning theories (the N-learning strategy ¿ hoarding knowledge and S-learning strategy ¿ sharing of knowledge), culture in relation to knowledge (identifies the centripetal culture ¿ tunnel vision and the centrifugal culture ¿ promotes learning), core competence and strategic intent, the impact of IT on knowledge and finally applies I-Space on two companies, Courtaulds and BP oil exploration business. The theory Boisot used to build his model and arguments are very fundamental ¿ deep-rooted in classic philosophy-, economy-, and chaos and complexity theories. However the major added value provided lies in the massive multifaceted range of examples offered, very intelligent and smart entrenched. Knowledge as keyword in the BN search engine generates more than 5000 books. However the number that fundaments the basic knowledge theory infrastructure doesn¿t exceed 25. There are essentially only a few you want to read the rest is all derived from this small number. Boisot book (next to Nonaka & Takeuchi) is certainly one that falls in the in the 25 cluster in view of the fact that it¿s an outstanding unique mental model clarified by smart examples. Downturn of his theory that¿s it very difficult to apply in a practical situation, nevertheless read it (absorb and exploit) and capture valuable `knowledge¿ on knowledge theories.

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