Knowledge Management: Historical and Cross-Disciplinary Themes / Edition 2

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Overview

Knowledge management (KM) is frequently presented as a recent development born entirely of the business world. However, the intellectual origins of knowledge management are both deeper and broader than have been posited in the literature to date. Influences of philosophy, economics, education, psychology, information and communication theory, and library and information studies have been almost completely overlooked. This book links current and historical works to the development of knowledge management across domains and disciplines to give students and scholars a deeper appreciation of the origins of KM and a better understanding of its intellectual origins, its concepts, and principles. Through his thorough and critical examination of historical and more recent classic works, Wallace demystifies this important, emerging area of study. An essential and fascinating read for LIS faculty, students, and practitioners; required reading for courses in Knowledge Management.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Wallace makes an important contribution to the knowledge management (KM) literature by explicating KM within a rich historical and multidisciplinary context. Organized by thematic chapters ranging from epistemology to systems thinking and learning organizations to taxonomies to KM itself, the book relies on key papers for each. While some papers, like Adrianna Kezars work on organizational learning, are omitted, overall Wallace is thorough. Wallaces carefully detailed discussions and numerous references to the primary KM literature in many disciplines make the book well suited for a library science and/or KM textbook….Highly recommended for library science, organizational development, knowledge management, and related academic library collections."

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Library Journal

"The strength of this book lies in the author's ability to pull together diverse philosophies and multiple theories as they relate to this new field called knowledge management. Wallace includes a fair representation of philosophies and highlights the contributions of each, using a writing style that is as simplified as advanced academic-level material permits. Collapsed biographies of philosophers are presented throughout the chapters, permitting readers insight into events that may have influenced their lives and thinking….This work recommends itself to library and information science faculty, students, and practitioners, and is considered required reading for courses in knowledge management. It is also useful for people in the computer sciences and human-computer interaction fields. Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through professionals."

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Choice

"Beginning with a discussion on the history of the use of the term knowledge management, the author proceeds in great detail to examine the literature of epistemology, especially as it relates to organizing and disseminating knowledge for use. Each chapter begins with key term definitions and is divided into easily digestible chunks. This is for those interested in the theory of knowledge and knowledge management."

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Library Media Connection

"This collection of easy-to-understand essays on previously published complex works from 1928 through 1999 is presented by a professor in the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Oklahoma, making the field approachable for novices. This work is intended for all students of knowledge management and closely related fields as well as knowledge management practitioners who want to place the field in context. . . . An extremely useful addition to any collection serving a population that studies or uses knowledge management, this work brings the often dry and hard-to-understand original writings to life with commentary and interpretation by an instructor of the field."

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ARBA

Library Journal

Wallace (Univ. of Oklahoma LIS) makes an important contribution to the knowledge management (KM) literature by explicating KM within a rich historical and multidisciplinary context. Organized by thematic chapters ranging from epistemology to systems thinking and learning organizations to taxonomies to KM itself, the book relies on key papers for each. While some papers, like Adrianna Kezar's work on organizational learning, are omitted, overall Wallace is thorough. Wallace's carefully detailed discussions and numerous references to the primary KM literature in many disciplines make the book well suited for a library science and/or KM textbook. The only fault is that the primary literature cited is not included-Wallace's discussions are so intriguing, one feels compelled to seek out the cited papers. Highly recommended for library science, organizational development, knowledge management, and related academic library collections.
—Sara Tompson

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781591585022
  • Publisher: Libraries Unlimited
  • Publication date: 12/30/2007
  • Series: Libraries Unlimited Knowledge Management Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 244
  • Sales rank: 1,181,292
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

DANNY P. WALLACE is Professor, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Oklahoma, Norman; has published widely. He was co-editor of RUSA Quarterly; is co-author of Library Evaluation (Libraries Unlimited, 1999); and serves on ALA's accreditation committee.

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Table of Contents

Introduction     1
The Nature of Knowledge     11
"The Logic of Tacit Inference," in Knowing and Being: Essays by Michael Polanyi, edited by Marjorie Greene (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1969), 138-58. First published 1964   Michael Polanyi     15
"Epistemology without a Knowing Subject," in Objective Knowledge: An Evolutionary Approach (Oxford: Clarendon, 1972), 106-52. (An address given on 25 Aug. 1967, at the Third International Congress for Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science, 25 Aug. to 2 Sept. 1967; first published in the proceedings of this Congress, ed. B. van Rootselaar and J. F. Staal, Amsterdam, 1968, pp. 333-73)   Karl Popper     22
"Question-Negotiation and Information Seeking in Libraries," College and Research Libraries 29 (May 1968): 178-94   Robert S. Taylor     25
The Knowledge-Creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation (New York: Oxford University Press, 1995)   Ikujiro Nonaka   Hirotaka Takeuchi     29
Communities of Practice     37
Democracy and Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education (New York: Macmillan, 1928)   John Dewey     45
Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991)   Jean Lave   Etienne Wenger     54
Organizational Learning and Learning Organizations     67
"Organizational Learning: Observations toward a Theory," Administrative Science Quarterly 10 (September 1965): 175-203   Vincent E. Cangelosi   William R. Dill     70
The Systems Approach (New York: Delta, 1968)   C. West Churchman     74
Organizational Learning: A Theory of Action Perspective (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1978)   Chris Argyris   Donald A. Schon     78
The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization (New York: Doubleday, 1990)   Peter Senge     83
Intellectual Capital and the Knowledge Economy     93
"Of Property," in The Second Treatise of Government: An Essay Concerning the True Original, Extent, and End of Civil Government, student edition, edited with an introduction and notes by Peter Laslett (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1968), 285-302. First published 1690   John Locke     95
The Production and Distribution of Knowledge in the United States (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1962)   Fritz Machlup     97
Information through the Printed Word: The Dissemination of Scholarly, Scientific, and Intellectual Knowledge (New York: Praeger, 1978-80)   Fritz Machlup     97
Knowledge: Its Creation, Distribution, and Economic Significance (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1980-83)   Fritz Machlup     97
"The Knowledge Economy," in The Age of Discontinuity: Guidelines to Our Changing Society (New York: Harper and Row, 1969), 263-86   Peter F. Drucker     100
Working Knowledge: How Organizations Manage What They Know (Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1998)   Thomas H. Davenport   Laurence Prusak     103
Knowledge Sharing     109
Invisible Colleges: Diffusion of Knowledge in Scientific Communities (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1971)   Diana Crane     111
Wellsprings of Knowledge: Building and Sustaining the Sources of Innovation (Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1995)   Dorothy Leonard-Barton     115
"Exploring Internal Stickiness: Impediments to the Transfer of Best Practice within the Firm," Strategic Management Journal 17 (Winter 1996): 27-43   Gabriel Szulanski     118
Knowledge Representation     123
"As We May Think," Atlantic Monthly, July 1945, 101-8   Vannevar Bush     128
"What's Important about Knowledge Representation?" Computer 16 (October 1983): 22-27   William A. Woods     132
"Where Is Meaning When Form Is Gone? Knowledge Representation on the Web," Information Research 6 (January 2001), http://informationr.net/ir/6-2/paper93.html   Terrence A. Brooks     134
Content Management     141
"Something About Bibliography," in International Organization and Dissemination of Knowledge: Selected Essays of Paul Otlet, translated and edited by W. Boyd Rayward (Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1990), 11-24. First published 1903   Paul Otlet     146
World Brain (Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Doran, 1938)   H. G. Wells     149
"Information Management: A Proposal" (unpublished report, CERN, 1989)   Tim Berners-Lee     152
"Collection Development and Scholarly Communication in the 21st Century: From Collection Management to Content Management," in Collection Management for the 21st Century: A Handbook for Librarians, edited by G. E. Gorman and Ruth H. Miller (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1997), 3-25   John M. Budd   Bart Harloe     155
Taxonomies and Ontologies     163
Rules for a Printed Dictionary Catalog (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1875)   Charles A. Cutter     177
"Social Epistemology, General Semantics, and Librarianship," Wilson Library Bulletin 35 (June 1961): 767-70   Jesse Shera     180
"Ontologies," Journal of Information Science 23 (1997): 277-86   B. C. Vickery     184
Informatics and Information Technology     191
The Human Use of Human Beings: Cybernetics and Society (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1950)   Norbert Wiener     198
"Towards a Person-Centered Computer Technology" (paper presented at the ACM National Conference, Atlanta, GA, 1973)   Rob Kling     206
"What Is Social Informatics and Why Does It Matter?" D-Lib 5, no. 1 (1999), http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january99/kling/01kling.html   Rob Kling     206
The Future of Knowledge Management     219
Index     229
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