Knowledge Management Strategy and Techology / Edition 2

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Overview

Bellaver and Lusa (both information and communication science, Ball State U.) urge chief executive, financial, and knowledge officers as well as other key enterprise executives to comprehend the enormity and wealth of the information cache available to them, from the lowest reaches of their enterprise to the farthest limits of the worldwide Internet. Once overwhelmed by such a tide, they say, knowledge management can focus the enterprise by acquiring, storing, and utilizing knowledge-relevant information critical to daily tasks. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781580531054
  • Publisher: Artech House, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/28/2001
  • Series: Computing Library
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 270
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Introduction xix
1 A practical framework for understanding KM 1
1.1 Introduction 1
1.1.1 How we know what we know: understanding knowledge 2
1.2 Information is knowledge in motion 5
1.2.1 Phenomena 8
1.2.2 Facts 8
1.2.3 Data 8
1.2.4 Information 9
1.2.5 Understanding 9
1.2.6 Wisdom 10
1.3 Applying Gates's metaphor of a "digital nervous system" 11
1.3.1 A four-layer model of the movement and use of information 12
1.3.2 Relation of technology and transmission/networking 14
1.3.3 Relation of form and content 14
1.4 Moving and using information: the practice of information networking in a KM context 16
1.5 Conclusion 18
1.5.1 The future of KM: distinctive trend or ubiquity 18
1.5.2 Future of technology: mechanized techniques 19
1.5.3 Recommendations 20
1.5.4 Overarching conclusion: humans know best--homo sapiens comes into its own 21
Endnotes 21
2 Document imaging and management: taming the paper tiger 23
2.1 Introduction 23
2.2 Information revolution 24
2.2.1 The business case 26
2.2.2 What is document imaging and management? 28
2.3 System solutions 29
2.3.1 American Electric Power 29
2.3.2 The railroad system 30
2.3.3 The bank solution 31
2.3.4 The utility solution 32
2.4 The moving parts of DIM 33
2.4.1 Preparing the documents 35
2.4.2 The software 36
2.4.3 Developing the network 37
2.5 Questions to be answered 38
2.6 Professionalism in the field 39
2.7 Conclusion 39
References 40
3 Groupware: messaging and cooperation 41
3.1 Introduction 41
3.2 A wide view 42
3.2.1 Groupware, the Internet, your intranet 43
3.2.2 Client-server architecture 43
3.2.3 Groupware functions: e-mail 44
3.2.4 Groupware functions: scheduling and calendaring 49
3.2.5 Groupware functions: real-time conferencing 50
3.2.6 Groupware functions: asynchronous conferencing 52
3.3 Conclusion 56
References 57
4 Developing effective knowledge with both qualitative and quantitative research 59
4.1 Introduction 59
4.1.1 Using quantitative and qualitative methods together for higher-quality data 60
4.2 Problems 62
4.2.1 Pitfalls of qualitative measurements 62
4.3 Solutions 65
4.3.1 Providing reliable qualitative research 65
4.3.2 Case study examples 68
4.3.3 Quality of Service in the wireless industry 69
4.3.4 Implementation of quick response information systems 70
4.3.5 Managerial and economic aspects of rapid information technology acquisition 71
4.3.6 Client-server computing 72
4.4 What to do next: use new technology 72
4.5 Conclusion 73
References 74
5 Systems architecture: the preparation for KM 75
5.1 Introduction 75
5.1.1 Current architecture 76
5.2 Problems: the opportunities and the challenges 79
5.2.1 Search and destroy--eliminate redundancy 80
5.2.2 Defining core data or what is to be mined 81
5.2.3 The data engine 82
5.2.4 There must be directories 82
5.2.5 Surround-increase flexibility of present systems 83
5.2.6 Quality data structure 84
5.2.7 Separate the data from the processing 85
5.2.8 Conceptual model 86
5.2.9 Supporting technology 86
5.2.10 The "look" or the "content"? 87
5.3 Implementing a KM strategy 88
5.3.1 KM side benefit 90
5.3.2 Data quality rules 91
5.4 Conclusion 92
Selected bibliography 93
6 Data warehousing: the storage and access of distributed information 95
6.1 Introduction 95
6.2 Storing information 97
6.3 Distributing information 99
6.4 Accessing information 100
6.4.1 Object Management Group CORBA and microsoft.com 100
6.4.2 Search engines 101
6.4.3 Client-server architectures 102
6.4.4 Distributed data 103
6.4.5 Object database structures 105
6.5 Using RAID technology for storage and protection 106
6.6 The data warehouse for storing information 107
6.7 Using the Web as a warehouse 109
6.8 Conclusion 110
Selected bibliography 112
7 An integrated development model for KM 113
7.1 Introduction 113
7.2 Defining the problem 114
7.2.1 What is KM? 115
7.2.2 Framework for a KM capability 115
7.3 Solution: integrated KM development model 118
7.3.1 Background 118
7.3.2 Overall process 118
7.4 Conclusion 133
References 134
8 The role of directories in KM 135
8.1 Background 135
8.2 Problems with the traditional directory 136
8.3 Full-service directory solution 137
8.3.1 Role of directory services 138
8.3.2 Building a directory foundation 138
8.3.3 The human factor 142
8.4 What to do next: finding knowledge workers 144
8.4.1 Some other ideas 145
8.4.2 Finding, accessing, and filtering knowledge 147
8.4.3 Publishing knowledge 148
8.5 Conclusion 149
References 150
9 The Internet as a mechanism to enhance content and extend access to corporate data resources 151
9.1 Background 151
9.1.1 Size, scope, and rate of growth of the Web 152
9.1.2 Information gold mine 153
9.2 Problems with information overload 153
9.2.1 Missing structure 154
9.2.2 Metadata: adding missing structure 155
9.2.3 Dublin Core 156
9.3 Solutions: harvesting the Internet 157
9.3.1 Broken links 158
9.3.2 PURLs of wisdom 159
9.3.3 Protecting the Internal Data warehouse: security concerns 160
9.3.4 Internal security risks 162
9.3.5 Controlling egress 163
9.4 What to do next by monitoring egress 164
9.4.1 Network storage 165
9.5 Conclusion 166
References 167
10 A case study: the power of managing knowledge in a worldwide enterprise 169
10.1 Introduction 169
10.2 Problems during transformation 170
10.3 Solution with first-generation KM 171
10.3.1 Teams and Communities 171
10.3.2 Key first-generation lessons 174
10.4 Continuing solutions with second-generation KM 175
10.4.1 Knowledge discovery 175
10.4.2 Key second-generation lessons 177
10.5 What to do next: go third-generation KM 178
10.5.1 Business transformation 178
10.6 Conclusion 179
11 KM for competitive advantage: mining diverse sources for marketing intelligence 181
11.1 Introduction 181
11.1.1 Ideal data to meet competitive goals 182
11.1.2 Matching real data to the ideal 184
11.1.3 Case study: modeling approach to build knowledge 187
11.1.4 Modeling technology to capitalize on diverse data 190
11.1.5 Results for modeling in competitive contexts 192
11.2 Solutions for decision support 194
11.2.1 New directions and products 195
11.3 Conclusion 197
References 198
12 Building knowledge communities with webs of connections 201
12.1 Background 201
12.1.1 Communities of interest 203
12.1.2 What does it do for Edmunds? 205
12.1.3 Accelerating business 206
12.1.4 Communities of practice 207
12.2 Solutions 208
12.2.1 Sharing knowledge 209
12.2.2 Communities of exchange 210
12.3 What to do next 211
12.4 Conclusion 212
12.4.1 Building successful knowledge communities 212
References 213
Appendix A Case studies list 215
Appendix B Selected bibliography 217
Appendix C Glossary 221
Contributors 227
Index 235
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