Kobzar's Children: A Century of Untold Ukranian Stories

Kobzar's Children: A Century of Untold Ukranian Stories

by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch
     
 

Due to more mature content, this book is recommended for children 14 and up.

The Kobzars were the blind minstrels of Ukraine, who memorized the epic poems and stories of 100 generations. Traveling around the country, they stopped in towns and villages along the way, where they told their tales and were welcomed by all. During the early years of Stalin's regime

Overview


Due to more mature content, this book is recommended for children 14 and up.

The Kobzars were the blind minstrels of Ukraine, who memorized the epic poems and stories of 100 generations. Traveling around the country, they stopped in towns and villages along the way, where they told their tales and were welcomed by all. During the early years of Stalin's regime in the USSR, the Kobzars wove their traditional stories with contemporary warnings of soviet repression, famine, and terror. When Stalin heard of it, he called the first conference of Kobzars in Ukraine. Hundreds congregated. Then Stalin had them murdered. As the storytellers of Ukraine died, so too did their stories.

Kobzar's Children is an anthology of short historical fiction, memoirs, and poems written about the Ukrainian immigrant experience. The stories span a century of history from 1905 to 2004; and they contain the voices of people who lived through internment as "enemy aliens," homesteading, famine, displacement, concentration camps, and this new century's Orange Revolution.
More than a collection, it is a social document that revives memories once deliberately forgotten.

- Century of untold stories

- Touches on all major points of Ukrainian history

- Supported by the Shevchenko Foundation

The collection contains historical fiction, memoirs and poems covering 100 years of Ukrainian history, written by Ukrainian-Canadian writers from Quebec, Ontario and Western Canada. The contributors are all part of a circle of writers that Skrypuch met or mentored through an internet-based writers' group that she set up. The group's members, both established authors and novices, read and critiqued each others' works.

All royalties from the sale of this book will be donated to the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Social injustice and the mistreatment of Ukrainian people, both in Europe and in Canada, are brought to the fore in this moving book that not only will revive some memories but will also ensure that the truth is told and the stories will not be forgotten. A fitting tribute to the resilience of the Ukrainian people, this book is long overdue.
Dyakoyu, Ms. Skrypuch!"

Highly Recommended

-- CM Magazine

"The anthology succeeds in providing a broad overview of a century of the Ukrainian immigrant experience."

-- Winnipeg Free Press

Children's Literature - Julie Schneggenburger
Kobzars were blind storytellers who traveled through Ukraine, memorizing poems and family histories. Their stories kept Ukrainian culture alive throughout many generations. This book is a collection of short stories from Ukrainian families. Each contributes its own special remembrance of life in Ukraine. Together, the stories piece together a history rich in traditions but torn apart by Communist regimes. Under Stalin, the Kremlin considered Ukrainians an undesirable group in society. Many were deported to concentration camps. Some refugees escaped but suffered from starvation and discrimination. One story tells how a man was so emaciated that his wedding ring slipped off his finger. Some Ukrainians emigrated to Canada and began farms in frontier lands. Country dances, embroidered clothing, and hard work defined their lives. Another story tells how a moose was a regular visitor to one family's farm. As displaced people in a free country, many Ukrainians were still considered lower class. Life was a struggle. One story tells how a father and son reunited in Canada after the war by luck. There is a lot of heartbreak but honesty in these stories. It's clear the author wanted the truth about this people's suffering to be acknowledged, and in the process, the stories give life to a beautiful culture that most people don't know about.
Children's Literature - Heidi Hauser Green
This collection of stories was truly a labor of love, borne of the author's lifelong hunger for stories about Ukrainian immigrants like her forebears. Here, gathered together in the pages of a single volume, are stories covering nearly a hundred years of Ukrainian immigrant history, from 1905 to 2004. The stories occur in a variety of settings, from homesteads to cities, internment camps to nursing homes, Ukraine to Canada, and more. Find out how Ukrainian immigrants were treated by Canadian officials during World War I, discover how one boy lost his entire family but somehow escaped from the 1932—1933 Famine-Genocide, and chuckle about one lad's desperate longing for a pair of red boots to wear at a community concert. Read about a farm girl's prank, walk along with a refugee during World War II, and think about the significance of the recent Orange Revolution. And it's all within the pages of this slender book. In this and earlier works, Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch truly continues the tradition of the kobzars, traveling storytellers who collected and shared the stories of the Ukrainian people. Her works are always educational and informative, recounting tales and times that have been ignored and forgotten, but they are certainly never, ever dull.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781550419979
Publisher:
Fitzhenry & Whiteside, Limited
Publication date:
06/30/2006
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
861,702
Product dimensions:
6.08(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.52(d)
Age Range:
12 - 14 Years

Meet the Author

Marsha Skrypuch is the author of many books for children, including Silver Threads, The Best Gifts, Enough, The Hunger and Hope's War. Among the numerous writing awards won her novel about the Armenian genocide, Nobody's Child, was nominated for the Red Maple Award, the Alberta Rocky Mountain Book Award, the B.C. Stellar Award; and it was listed by Resource Links as a Best Book.

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