Korean Americans

Korean Americans

by William David Thomas
     
 

America has always been a nation of immigrants, and it still is. Each year, hundreds of thousands of new Americans come to the United States to make a better life for themselves and their families. Their assimilation is not always easy, but they bring with them new customs and traditions that enrich American culture.

A Super Bowl MVP. A grocery store owner. An

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Overview

America has always been a nation of immigrants, and it still is. Each year, hundreds of thousands of new Americans come to the United States to make a better life for themselves and their families. Their assimilation is not always easy, but they bring with them new customs and traditions that enrich American culture.

A Super Bowl MVP. A grocery store owner. An author of children's books. A California fruit grower. One common thread connects these people: they are all Korean Americans. Meet them—and others—in this book, from the first plantation workers in Hawaii in 1903 to the most recent new Americans.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ellen Welty
One of the more important influences in what we call American culture is the exposure to other customs that we gain from immigrants to the United States. Koreans comprise a smaller group of immigrants than do some other cultures, but their influence is nevertheless important. This title, which is part of the "New Americans" series, discusses the Korean-American community today with data from the Census Bureau and other agencies that illustrate the population centers and the timeline of immigration from Korea. The second chapter of the book discusses the history of Korea and the circumstances leading to immigration. There are individual stories in sidebars throughout the book that include several episodes in one family's story, following them for a number of years. Subsequent chapters in the book relate the challenges that Koreans and all immigrants face when moving to a new country, including poor working conditions, prejudice, language barriers, and other circumstances. One of the later chapters discusses specific changes that Koreans have made to their adopted culture. Those changes include music and architecture. The last chapter, called "Looking to the Future," relates a "reverse migration" since the Korean economy has improved so much that many immigrants or their children have returned to Korea to live. Appendices include a page of facts, a glossary, a bibliography, and an index. This book and the others in the series would be very useful in social studies units. Reviewer: Ellen Welty

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761443063
Publisher:
Cavendish, Marshall Corporation
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Series:
New Americans Series
Pages:
80
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
10 - 13 Years

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