Kusamakura

Kusamakura

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by Natsume Soseki
     
 

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Kusamakura which literally translates into "grass pillow" is a common Japanese phrase used in poetry to signify a journey. Considering that Natsume Soseki's novel "Kusamakura" is the story of an artist who retreats to the mountains where he stays at a remote, almost deserted hotel, the title would seem apropos. While there the artist becomes intrigued by the hotel's…  See more details below

Overview

Kusamakura which literally translates into "grass pillow" is a common Japanese phrase used in poetry to signify a journey. Considering that Natsume Soseki's novel "Kusamakura" is the story of an artist who retreats to the mountains where he stays at a remote, almost deserted hotel, the title would seem apropos. While there the artist becomes intrigued by the hotel's mysterious hostess, O-Nami, who reminds him of the female in a famous painting. Described by the author as a haiku styled novel the book takes on what should be considered as an experimental style. "Kusamakura" is a combination of musings, poetry and descriptions of our nameless artist. Numerous references are made to writers, poets, and other artists as the narrator meditates on art and the artist's position in society. "Kusamakura" might be considered as a philosophical treatise on aesthetics narrated in the form of a story, certainly as an intriguing early work by an author who would be regarded by some as Japan's greatest ever.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780143105190
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
01/29/2008
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
1,139,893
Product dimensions:
5.02(w) x 7.69(h) x 0.45(d)
Lexile:
1110L (what's this?)
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Natsume Soseki (1867-1916) is one of the best-known Japanese authors of the 20th century and considered as the master of psychological fiction. As well as his works of fiction, his essays, haiku, and kanshi have been influential and are popular even today.

Meredith McKinney holds a PhD in medieval Japanese literature from the University in Canberra, where she teaches in the Japan Centre. Her other translations include Ravine and Other Stories, The Tale of Saigyo, and for Penguin Classics, The Pillow Book and Kokoro.

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