L

L

by moe.
     
 
Moe may not yet be a household name -- well, aside from households with "Three Stooges" obsessions, that is -- but this upstate New York quintet has quietly assembled one of the more ravenous fan bases in the realm of improvisational, jam-oriented rock. This double-disc live collection captures the band in its natural concert-stage setting, with all the shimmering

Overview

Moe may not yet be a household name -- well, aside from households with "Three Stooges" obsessions, that is -- but this upstate New York quintet has quietly assembled one of the more ravenous fan bases in the realm of improvisational, jam-oriented rock. This double-disc live collection captures the band in its natural concert-stage setting, with all the shimmering colors and off-the-wall cavorting that that implies. Extended versions of Moe staples like "Buster" and "Recreational Chemistry" manage to split the difference between friendly familiarity and adventurous exploration -- keyed as they are by the dual-guitar brush-cutting of Al Schnier and Chuck Garvey. Like their fellow travelers in Phish, Moe are willing and able to delve into smoky jazz and deep blue country as well as straight-ahead rock -- as evidenced by ditties like "Yodelittle" and "Akimbo." Languid and richly textured, L has plenty to offer die-hard fans, but it also serves as a nice taster for anyone who craves explorative music that's not aimed at the short attention span.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Jesse Jarnow
Recorded at several shows across their fall 1999 tour, L captures Moe in the process of moving from an adventurous bar and club band to a respectably polished theater act. With the reintegration of former drummer Jim Loughlin back into the band as a multi-instrumental utility man in early 1999, the band vastly expanded their textural palette. While the band tightened, though, they also ossified, losing some of their sense of improvisational risk-taking. The jams on the double album are swift and directed, but sound almost rehearsed to a fault (especially in contrast with their previous improv-based releases, the live album Loaf and Meat single). The version of "Meat" featured on L, for example, is quick and brutal. Its high energy improvisation is organized in the round as each player leads briefly before passing the musical baton to the next musician. While this keeps the music from drifting, it also robs the piece of collective creativity. Critics have often accused the band's sound of being derivative. While specific influences -- Frank Zappa, Neil Young, the Allman Brothers Band, to name a few -- are pretty easy to pick out, the band generally uses this to their advantage, creating a sound that carries with it a surprising amount of depth, mostly through highly personable interplay between the instruments, notably guitarists Al Schnier and Chuck Garvey.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/11/2000
Label:
Fat Boy Records
UPC:
0650869663320
catalogNumber:
6633
Rank:
119799

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

moe.   Primary Artist
Rob Derhak   Bass,Electric Bass,Vocals
Chuck Garvey   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar,Vocals
Schnier   Acoustic Guitar,Mandolin,Electric Guitar,Vocals
Jim Loughlin   Acoustic Guitar,Flute,Percussion,Drums,Didjeridu
Vinnie Amico   Percussion,Drums

Technical Credits

John Siket   Producer
Bill Emmons   Engineer
moe.   Producer
Rob Derhak   Songwriter,Producer
Chuck Garvey   Songwriter,Producer
Schnier   Songwriter,Producer
Jim Loughlin   Songwriter,Producer
Vinnie Amico   Producer
Andy Tori   Engineer

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