Casa del Diavolo

La Casa del Diavolo

by Il Giardino Armonico
     
 
For their first recording in five years, Il Giardino Armonico have chosen a varied program of 18th-century music that, as the liner notes put it, conveys "strong passions." It's an appropriate theme for a group that first gained attention in the early '90s with a notoriously supercharged account of Vivaldi's The Four Seasons

Overview

For their first recording in five years, Il Giardino Armonico have chosen a varied program of 18th-century music that, as the liner notes put it, conveys "strong passions." It's an appropriate theme for a group that first gained attention in the early '90s with a notoriously supercharged account of Vivaldi's The Four Seasons. Not all of their recordings since have proved so controversial, but it's good to see that the group and their leader, Giovanni Antonini, have lost none of their vim and vigor. From Gluck's "Dance of the Furies" (familiar from the opera Orfeo ed Euridice but here attributed to a 1761 ballet called Don Juan, where it accompanied the Don's descent into hell) to Boccherini's Sinfonia "La casa del diavolo" (which was inspired by Gluck's ballet), Il Giardino offer the expected mix of brisk tempos, pointed accents, and strongly contrasting dynamics. They're not afraid to turn the heat down to a simmer in Locatelli's Concerto Grosso "Il pianto d'Arianna," a fascinating eight-part psychological portrait, in a way, of the mythical Arianna (a detailed movement-by-movement interpretation is offered in the booklet). And the two works by sons of J. S. Bach -- C. P. E.'s B Minor Sinfonia and W. F.'s F Minor Harpsichord Concerto -- bake more than blister. But throughout, the performances are filled with a bracing energy, and the playing is never less than spot-on. Devilishly good fun.

Editorial Reviews

Gramophone - Richard Lawrence
The performances can't be faulted: Antonini gets all the fire and fury of the music out of his players without being afraid of relaxing where appropriate.... Heaven knows where you would find this unfashionably mixed programme in a record shop; but seek it out and you will be well rewarded.
San Francisco Chronicle - Steven Winn
Devilishly inspired. Il Giardino Armonico...brings an infectious, infernal spirit to a program of 18th-century 'pre-Romantic' music.

Product Details

Release Date:
04/19/2005
Label:
Opus 111
UPC:
0709861303991
catalogNumber:
30399
Rank:
113858

Tracks

  1. Don Juan, ballet: Danza degli spettri e delle furie - allegro non tr  - Christoph Willibald Gluck  - Giovanni Antonini  -  Il Giardino Armonico  - Hervé Boissière  - Bernhard Trebuch
  2. Symphony for strings & continuo in B minor (Sei sinfonie No. 5), H. 661, Wq. 182/5  - Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach  - Giovanni Antonini  -  Il Giardino Armonico  - Hervé Boissière  - Bernhard Trebuch
  3. Concerto Grosso in E flat major, Op. 7/6  - Pietro Antonio Locatelli  - Giovanni Antonini  -  Il Giardino Armonico  - Hervé Boissière  - Enrico Onofri  - Bernhard Trebuch
  4. Concerto for harpsichord & strings in F minor ("Berlin"), CW C73 (T. 301/4)  - Johann Christian Bach  - Giovanni Antonini  -  Il Giardino Armonico  - Hervé Boissière  - Bernhard Trebuch  - Ottavio Dantone
  5. Symphony in D minor ("La casa del diavolo"), G. 506 (Op. 12/4)  - Luigi Boccherini  - Giovanni Antonini  -  Il Giardino Armonico  - Hervé Boissière  - Bernhard Trebuch

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