BN.com Gift Guide

La isla bajo el mar (Island Beneath the Sea)

( 39 )

Overview

Para ser una esclava en el Saint-Domingue de finales del siglo XVIII, Zarité había tenido buena estrella: a los nueve años fue vendida a Toulouse Valmorain, un rico terrateniente, pero no conoció ni el agotamiento de las plantaciones de caña ni la asfixia y el sufrimiento de los trapiches, porque siempre fue una esclava doméstica. Su bondad natural, fortaleza de espíritu y honradez le permitieron compartir los secretos y la espiritualidad que ayudaban a sobrevivir a los suyos, los esclavos, y conocer las miserias...

See more details below
Paperback (Spanish-language Edition)
$12.16
BN.com price
(Save 23%)$15.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (21) from $4.88   
  • New (10) from $9.44   
  • Used (11) from $4.88   
La isla bajo el mar

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$4.99
BN.com price

Overview

Para ser una esclava en el Saint-Domingue de finales del siglo XVIII, Zarité había tenido buena estrella: a los nueve años fue vendida a Toulouse Valmorain, un rico terrateniente, pero no conoció ni el agotamiento de las plantaciones de caña ni la asfixia y el sufrimiento de los trapiches, porque siempre fue una esclava doméstica. Su bondad natural, fortaleza de espíritu y honradez le permitieron compartir los secretos y la espiritualidad que ayudaban a sobrevivir a los suyos, los esclavos, y conocer las miserias de los amos, los blancos. Zarité se convirtió en el centro de un microcosmos que era un reflejo del mundo de la colonia: el amo Valmorain, su frágil esposa española y su sensible hijo Maurice, el sabio Parmentier, el militar Relais y la cortesana mulata Violette, Tante Rose, la curandera, Gambo, el apuesto esclavo rebelde… y otros personajes de una cruel conflagración que acabaría arrasando su tierra y lanzándolos lejos de ella. Al ser llevada por su amo a Nueva Orleans, Zarité inició una nueva etapa en la que alcanzaría su mayor aspiración: la libertad. Más allá del dolor y del amor, de la sumisión y la independencia, de sus deseos y los que le habían impuesto a lo largo de su vida, Zarité podía contemplarla con serenidad y concluir que había tenido buena estrella.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
La isla bajo el mar. (The Island Below the Sea) Allende, Isabel. U.S.: Vintage Español: Random House. 2009. 510p. ISBN 978-0-307-47604-3. $26.95. HISTORICAL FICTION STARAllende’s latest excursion into historical fiction takes us to the Caribbean of the late 18th to early 19th century, first to the island of Saint-Domingue (Santo Domingo—later the capital of the Dominican Republic) and then to New Orleans. Toulouse Valmorain, a French national who comes to the New World to save his father’s sugar plantation and the family, yearns to return to Paris. A humanist by nature, he is uncomfortable with the institution of slavery but considers it a necessary evil for the profitable running of the plantation. The first persona narratives of the slave Zarité, Valmorain’s wife’s servant, are the heart and soul of this novel, where passionate human melodrama takes place against the backdrop of exciting historical revolts, as slaves fight for their freedom and plantation owners struggle to maintain the status quo. Allende is diligent at recreating the varied cultures that collided in the Caribbean at that time. Readers will sink their teeth into this sweeping epic, It is an indispensable addition to every collection.—Sara Martinez, Hispanic Resource Center; Tulsa City-County Library System, OK
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307476050
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/31/2010
  • Language: Spanish
  • Edition description: Spanish-language Edition
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 233,751
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Isabel Allende nació en 1942 en Perú, donde su padre era diplomático chileno. Vivió en Chile entre 1945 y 1975, con largas temporadas de residencia en otros lugares, en Venezuela hasta 1988 y, a partir de entonces, en California. Inició su carrera literaria en el periodismo, en Chile y en Venezuela. En 1982 su primera novela, La casa de los espíritus, se convirtió en uno de los títulos míticos de la literatura latinoamericana. A ella le siguieron otros muchos, todos los cuales han sido éxitos internacionales. Su obra ha sido traducida a treinta y cinco idiomas.

Biography

In Isabel Allende's books, human beings do not exist merely in the three-dimensional sense. They can exert themselves as memory, as destiny, as spirits without form, as fairy tales. Just as the more mystical elements of Allende's past have shaped her work, so has the hard-bitten reality. Working as a journalist in Chile, Allende was forced to flee the country with her family after her uncle, President Salvador Allende, was killed in a coup in 1973.

Out of letters to family back in Chile came the manuscript that was to become Allende's first novel. Her arrival on the publishing scene in 1985 with The House of the Spirits was instantly recognized as a literary event. The New York Times called it "a unique achievement, both personal witness and possible allegory of the past, present and future of Latin America."

To read a book by Allende is to believe in (or be persuaded of) the power of transcendence, spiritual and otherwise. Her characters are often what she calls "marginal," those who strive to live on the fringes of society. It may be someone like Of Love and Shadows 's Hipolito Ranquileo, who makes his living as a circus clown; or Eva Luna, a poor orphan who is the center of two Allende books (Eva Luna and The Stories of Eva Luna).

Allende's characters have in common an inner fortitude that proves stronger than their adversity, and a sense of lineage that propels them both forward and backward. When you meet a central character in an Allende novel, be prepared to meet a few generations of his or her family. This multigenerational thread drives The House of the Spirits, the tale of the South American Trueba family. Not only did the novel draw Allende critical accolades (with such breathless raves as "spectacular," "astonishing" and "mesmerizing" from major reviewers), it landed her firmly in the magic realist tradition of predecessor (and acknowledged influence) Gabriel García Márquez. Some of its characters also reappeared in the historical novels Portrait in Sepia and Daughter of Fortune.

"It's strange that my work has been classified as magic realism," Allende has said, "because I see my novels as just being realistic literature." Indeed, much of what might be considered "magic" to others is real to Allende, who based the character Clara del Valle in The House of the Spirits on her own reputedly clairvoyant grandmother. And she has drawn as well upon the political violence that visited her life: Of Love and Shadows (1987) centers on a political crime in Chile, and other Allende books allude to the ideological divisions that affected the author so critically.

But all of her other work was "rehearsal," says Allende, for what she considers her most difficult and personal book. Paula is written for Allende's daughter, who died in 1992 after several months in a coma. Like Allende's fiction, it tells Paula's story through that of Allende's own and of her relatives. Allende again departed from fiction in Aphrodite, a book that pays homage to the romantic powers of food (complete with recipes for two such as "Reconciliation Soup"). The book's lighthearted subject matter had to have been a necessity for Allende, who could not write for nearly three years after the draining experience of writing Paula.

Whichever side of reality she is on, Allende's voice is unfailingly romantic and life-affirming, creating mystery even as she uncloaks it. Like a character in Of Love and Shadows, Allende tells "stories of her own invention whose aim [is] to ease suffering and make time pass more quickly," and she succeeds.

Good To Know

Allende has said that the character of Gregory Reeves in The Infinite Plan is based on her husband, Willie Gordon.

Allende begins all of her books on January 8, which she considers lucky because it was the day she began writing a letter to her dying grandfather that later became The House of the Spirits.

She began her career as a journalist, editing the magazine Paula and later contributing to the Venezuelan paper El Nacional.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

PRIMERA PARTE
Saint-Domingue, 1770-1793


El mal español

Toulouse Valmorain llegó a Saint-Domingue en 1770, el mismo año que el delfín de Francia se casó con la archiduquesa austríaca María Antonieta. Antes de viajar a la colonia, cuando todavía no sospechaba que su destino le iba a jugar una broma y acabaría enterrado entre cañaverales en las Antillas, había sido invitado a Versalles a una de las fiestas en honor de la nueva delfina, una chiquilla rubia de catorce años, que bostezaba sin disimulo en medio del rígido protocolo de la corte francesa.

Todo eso quedó en el pasado. Saint-Domingue era otro mundo. El joven Valmorain tenía una idea bastante vaga del lugar donde su padre amasaba mal que bien el pan de la familia con la ambición de convertirlo en una fortuna. Había leído en alguna parte que los habitantes originales de la isla, los arahuacos, la llamaban Haití, antes de que los conquistadores le cambiaran el nombre por La Española y acabaran con los nativos. En menos de cincuenta años no quedó un solo arahuaco vivo ni de muestra: todos perecieron, víctimas de la esclavitud, las enfermedades europeas y el suicidio. Eran una raza de piel rojiza, pelo grueso y negro, de inalterable dignidad, tan tímidos que un solo español podía vencer a diez de ellos a mano desnuda. Vivían en comunidades polígamas, cultivando la tierra con cuidado para no agotarla: camote, maíz, calabaza, maní, pimientos, patatas y mandioca. La tierra, como el cielo y el agua, no tenía dueño hasta que los extranjeros se apoderaron de ella para cultivar plantas nunca vistas con el trabajo forzado de los arahuacos. En ese tiempo comenzó la costumbre de «aperrear»: matar a personas indefensas azuzando perros contra ellas. Cuando terminaron con los indígenas, importaron esclavos secuestrados en África y blancos de Europa, convictos, huérfanos, prostitutas y revoltosos.

A fines de los mil seiscientos España cedió la parte occidental de la isla a Francia, que la llamó Saint-Domingue y que habría de convertirse en la colonia más rica del mundo. Para la época en que Toulouse Valmorain llegó allí, un tercio de las exportaciones de Francia, a través del azúcar, café, tabaco, algodón, índigo y cacao, provenía de la isla. Ya no había esclavos blancos, pero los negros sumaban cientos de miles. El cultivo más exigente era la caña de azúcar, el oro dulce de la colonia; cortar la caña, triturarla y reducirla a jarabe, no era labor de gente, sino de bestia, como sostenían los plantadores.

Valmorain acababa de cumplir veinte años cuando fue convocado a la colonia por una carta apremiante del agente comercial de su padre. Al desembarcar iba vestido a la última moda: puños de encaje, peluca empolvada y zapatos de tacones altos, seguro de que los libros de exploración que había leído lo capacitaban de sobra para asesorar a su padre durante unas semanas. Viajaba con un valet, casi tan gallardo como él, varios baúles con su vestuario y sus libros. Se definía como hombre de letras y a su regreso a Francia pensaba dedicarse a la ciencia. Admiraba a los filósofos y enciclopedistas, que tanto impacto habían tenido en Europa en las décadas recientes y coincidía con algunas de sus ideas liberales: El contrato social de Rousseau había sido su texto de cabecera a los dieciocho años. Apenas desembarcó, después de una travesía que por poco termina en tragedia al enfrentarse a un huracán en el Caribe, se llevó la primera sorpresa desagradable: su progenitor no lo esperaba en el puerto. Lo recibió el agente, un judío amable, vestido de negro de la cabeza a los pies, quien lo puso al día sobre las precauciones necesarias para movilizarse en la isla, le facilitó caballos, un par de mulas para el equipaje, un guía y un miliciano para que los acompañaran a la habitation Saint-Lazare. El joven jamás había puesto los pies fuera de Francia y había prestado muy poca atención a las anécdotas —banales, por lo demás— que solía contar su padre en sus infrecuentes visitas a la familia en París. No imaginó que alguna vez iría a la plantación; el acuerdo tácito era que su padre consolidaría la fortuna en la isla, mientras él cuidaba a su madre y sus hermanas y supervisaba los negocios en Francia. La carta que había recibido aludía a problemas de salud y supuso que se trataba de una fiebre transitoria, pero al llegar a Saint-Lazare, después de un día de marcha a mata caballo por una naturaleza glotona y hostil, se dio cuenta de que su padre se estaba muriendo. No sufría de malaria, como él creía, sino de sífilis, que devastaba a blancos, negros y mulatos por igual. La enfermedad había alcanzado su última etapa y su padre estaba casi inválido, cubierto de pústulas, con los dientes flojos y la mente entre brumas. Las curaciones dantescas de sangrías, mercurio y cauterizaciones del pene con alambres al rojo no lo habían aliviado, pero seguía practicándolas como acto de contrición. Acababa de cumplir cincuenta años y estaba convertido en un anciano que daba órdenes disparatadas, se orinaba sin control y estaba siempre en una hamaca con sus mascotas, un par de negritas que apenas habían alcanzado la pubertad.

Mientras los esclavos desempacaban su equipaje bajo las órdenes del valet, un currutaco que apenas había soportado la travesía en barco y estaba espantado ante las condiciones primitivas del lugar, Toulouse Valmorain salió a recorrer la vasta propiedad. Nada sabía del cultivo de caña, pero le bastó aquel paseo para comprender que los esclavos estaban famélicos y la plantación sólo se había salvado de la ruina porque el mundo consumía azúcar con creciente voracidad. En los libros de contabilidad encontró la explicación de las malas finanzas de su padre, que no podía mantener a la familia en París con el decoro que correspondía a su posición. La producción era un desastre y los esclavos caían como chinches; no le cupo duda de que los capataces robaban aprovechándose del estremecedor deterioro del amo. Maldijo su suerte y se dispuso a arremangarse y trabajar, algo que ningún joven de su medio se planteaba: el trabajo era para otra clase de gente. Empezó por conseguir un suculento préstamo gracias al apoyo y las conexiones con banqueros del agente comercial de su padre, luego mandó a los commandeurs a los cañaverales, a trabajar codo a codo con los mismos a quienes habían martirizado antes y los reemplazó por otros menos depravados, redujo los castigos y contrató a un veterinario, que pasó dos meses en Saint-Lazare tratando de devolver algo de salud a los negros. El veterinario no pudo salvar a su valet, al que despachó una diarrea fulminante en menos de treinta y ocho horas. Valmorain se dio cuenta de que los esclavos de su padre duraban un promedio de dieciocho meses antes de escaparse o caer muertos de fatiga, mucho menos que en otras plantaciones. Las mujeres vivían más que los hombres, pero rendían menos en la labor agobiante de los cañaverales y tenían la mala costumbre de quedar preñadas. Como muy pocos críos sobrevivían, los plantadores habían calculado que la fertilidad entre los negros era tan baja, que no resultaba rentable. El joven Valmorain realizó los cambios necesarios de forma automática, sin planes y deprisa, decidido a irse muy pronto, pero cuando su padre murió, unos meses más tarde, debió enfrentarse al hecho ineludible de que estaba atrapado. No pretendía dejar sus huesos en esa colonia infestada de mosquitos, pero si se marchaba antes de tiempo perdería la plantación y con ella los ingresos y posición social de su familia en Francia.

Valmorain no intentó relacionarse con otros colonos. Los grands blancs, propietarios de otras plantaciones,lo consideraban un presumido que no duraría mucho en la isla; por lo mismo se asombraron al verlo con las botas embarradas y quemado por el sol. La antipatía era mutua. Para Valmorain, esos franceses trasplantados a las Antillas eran unos palurdos, lo opuesto de la sociedad que él había frecuentado, donde se exaltaban las ideas, la ciencia y las artes y nadie hablaba de dinero ni de esclavos. De la «edad de la razón» en París, pasó a hundirse en un mundo primitivo y violento en que los vivos y los muertos andaban de la mano. Tampoco hizo amistad con los petits blancs, cuyo único capital era el color de la piel, unos pobres diablos emponzoñados por la envidia y la maledicencia, como él decía. Provenían de los cuatro puntos cardinales y no había manera de averiguar su pureza de sangre o su pasado. En el mejor de los casos eran mercaderes, artesanos, frailes de poca virtud, marineros, militares y funcionarios menores, pero también había maleantes, chulos, criminales y bucaneros que utilizaban cada recoveco del Caribe para sus canalladas. Nada tenía él en común con esa gente.

Entre los mulatos libres o affranchis existían más de sesenta clasificaciones según el porcentaje de sangre blanca, que determinaba su nivel social. Valmorain nunca logró distinguir los tonos ni aprender la denominación de cada combinación de las dos razas. Los affranchis carecían de poder político, pero manejaban mucho dinero; por eso los blancospobres los odiaban. Algunos se ganaban la vida con tráficos ilícitos, desde contrabando hasta prostitución, pero otros habían sido educados en Francia y poseían fortuna, tierras y esclavos. Porencima de las sutilezas del color, los mulatos estaban unidos por su aspiración común a pasar por blancos y su desprecio visceral por los negros. Los esclavos, cuyo número era diez veces mayor que el de los blancos y affranchis juntos, no contaban para nada, ni en el censo de la población ni en la conciencia de los colonos.

Ya que no le convenía aislarse por completo, Toulouse Valmorain frecuentaba de vez en cuando a algunas familias de grands blancs en Le Cap, la ciudad más cercana a su plantación. En esos viajes compraba lo necesario para abastecerse y, si no podía evitarlo, pasaba por la Asamblea Colonial a saludar a sus pares, así no olvidarían su apellido, pero no participaba en las sesiones. También aprovechaba para ver comedias en el teatro, asistir a fiestas de las cocottes—las exuberantes cortesanas francesas, españolas y de razas mezcladas que dominaban la vida nocturna— y codearse con exploradores y científicos que se detenían en la isla, de paso hacia otros sitios más interesantes. Saint-Domingue no atraía visitantes, pero a veces llegaban algunos a estudiar la naturaleza o la economía de las Antillas, a quienes Valmorain invitaba a Saint-Lazare con la intención de recuperar, aunque fuese brevemente, el placer de la conversación elevada que había aderezado sus años de París. Tres años después de la muerte de su padre podía mostrarles la propiedad con orgullo; había transformado aquel estropicio de negros enfermos y cañaverales secos en una de las plantaciones más prósperas entre las ochocientas de la isla, había multiplicado por cinco el volumen de azúcar sin refinar para exportación e instalado una destilería donde producía selectas barricas de un ron mucho más fino que el que solía beberse. Sus visitantes pasaban una o dos semanas en la rústica casona de madera, empapándose de la vida de campo y apreciando de cerca la mágica invención del azúcar. Se paseaban a caballo entre los densos pastos que silbaban amenazantes por la brisa, protegidos del sol por grandes sombreros de pajilla y boqueando en la humedad hirviente del Caribe, mientras los esclavos, como afiladas sombras, cortaban las plantas a ras de tierra sin matar la raíz, para que hubiera otras cosechas. De lejos, parecían insectos entre los abigarrados cañaverales que los doblaban en altura. La labor de limpiar las duras cañas, picarlas en las máquinas dentadas, estrujarlas en las prensas y hervir el jugo en profundos calderos de cobre para obtener un jarabe oscuro, resultaba fascinante para esa gente de ciudad que sólo había visto los albos cristales que endulzaban el café. Esos visitantes ponían al día a Valmorain sobre los sucesos de Europa, cada vez más remota para él, los nuevos adelantos tecnológicos y científicos y las ideas filosóficas de moda. Le abrían un portillo para que atisbara el mundo y le dejaban de regalo algunos libros. Valmorain disfrutaba con sus huéspedes, pero más disfrutaba cuando se iban; no le gustaba tener testigos en su vida ni en su propiedad. Los extranjeros observaban la esclavitud con una mezcla de repugnancia y morbosa curiosidad que le resultaba ofensiva porque se consideraba un amo justo: si supieran cómo trataban otros plantadores a sus negros, estarían de acuerdo con él. Sabía que más de uno volvería a la civilización convertido en abolicionista y dispuesto a sabotear el consumo de azúcar. Antes de verse obligado a vivir en la isla también le habría chocado la esclavitud, de haber conocido los detalles, pero su padre nunca se refirió al tema. Ahora, con cientos de esclavos a su cargo, sus ideas al respecto habían cambiado.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

La isla bajo el mar


By Isabel Allende

Vintage

Copyright © 2010 Isabel Allende
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780307476050

PRIMERA PARTE
Saint-Domingue, 1770-1793


El mal español


Toulouse Valmorain llegó a Saint-Domingue en 1770, el mismo año que el delfín de Francia se casó con la archiduquesa austríaca María Antonieta. Antes de viajar a la colonia, cuando todavía no sospechaba que su destino le iba a jugar una broma y acabaría enterrado entre cañaverales en las Antillas, había sido invitado a Versalles a una de las fiestas en honor de la nueva delfina, una chiquilla rubia de catorce años, que bostezaba sin disimulo en medio del rígido protocolo de la corte francesa.

Todo eso quedó en el pasado. Saint-Domingue era otro mundo. El joven Valmorain tenía una idea bastante vaga del lugar donde su padre amasaba mal que bien el pan de la familia con la ambición de convertirlo en una fortuna. Había leído en alguna parte que los habitantes originales de la isla, los arahuacos, la llamaban Haití, antes de que los conquistadores le cambiaran el nombre por La Española y acabaran con los nativos. En menos de cincuenta años no quedó un solo arahuaco vivo ni de muestra: todos perecieron, víctimas de la esclavitud, las enfermedades europeas y el suicidio. Eran una raza de piel rojiza, pelo grueso y negro, de inalterable dignidad, tan tímidos que un solo español podía vencer a diez de ellos a mano desnuda. Vivían en comunidades polígamas, cultivando la tierra con cuidado para no agotarla: camote, maíz, calabaza, maní, pimientos, patatas y mandioca. La tierra, como el cielo y el agua, no tenía dueño hasta que los extranjeros se apoderaron de ella para cultivar plantas nunca vistas con el trabajo forzado de los arahuacos. En ese tiempo comenzó la costumbre de «aperrear»: matar a personas indefensas azuzando perros contra ellas. Cuando terminaron con los indígenas, importaron esclavos secuestrados en África y blancos de Europa, convictos, huérfanos, prostitutas y revoltosos.

A fines de los mil seiscientos España cedió la parte occidental de la isla a Francia, que la llamó Saint-Domingue y que habría de convertirse en la colonia más rica del mundo. Para la época en que Toulouse Valmorain llegó allí, un tercio de las exportaciones de Francia, a través del azúcar, café, tabaco, algodón, índigo y cacao, provenía de la isla. Ya no había esclavos blancos, pero los negros sumaban cientos de miles. El cultivo más exigente era la caña de azúcar, el oro dulce de la colonia; cortar la caña, triturarla y reducirla a jarabe, no era labor de gente, sino de bestia, como sostenían los plantadores.

Valmorain acababa de cumplir veinte años cuando fue convocado a la colonia por una carta apremiante del agente comercial de su padre. Al desembarcar iba vestido a la última moda: puños de encaje, peluca empolvada y zapatos de tacones altos, seguro de que los libros de exploración que había leído lo capacitaban de sobra para asesorar a su padre durante unas semanas. Viajaba con un valet, casi tan gallardo como él, varios baúles con su vestuario y sus libros. Se definía como hombre de letras y a su regreso a Francia pensaba dedicarse a la ciencia. Admiraba a los filósofos y enciclopedistas, que tanto impacto habían tenido en Europa en las décadas recientes y coincidía con algunas de sus ideas liberales: El contrato social de Rousseau había sido su texto de cabecera a los dieciocho años. Apenas desembarcó, después de una travesía que por poco termina en tragedia al enfrentarse a un huracán en el Caribe, se llevó la primera sorpresa desagradable: su progenitor no lo esperaba en el puerto. Lo recibió el agente, un judío amable, vestido de negro de la cabeza a los pies, quien lo puso al día sobre las precauciones necesarias para movilizarse en la isla, le facilitó caballos, un par de mulas para el equipaje, un guía y un miliciano para que los acompañaran a la habitation Saint-Lazare. El joven jamás había puesto los pies fuera de Francia y había prestado muy poca atención a las anécdotas —banales, por lo demás— que solía contar su padre en sus infrecuentes visitas a la familia en París. No imaginó que alguna vez iría a la plantación; el acuerdo tácito era que su padre consolidaría la fortuna en la isla, mientras él cuidaba a su madre y sus hermanas y supervisaba los negocios en Francia. La carta que había recibido aludía a problemas de salud y supuso que se trataba de una fiebre transitoria, pero al llegar a Saint-Lazare, después de un día de marcha a mata caballo por una naturaleza glotona y hostil, se dio cuenta de que su padre se estaba muriendo. No sufría de malaria, como él creía, sino de sífilis, que devastaba a blancos, negros y mulatos por igual. La enfermedad había alcanzado su última etapa y su padre estaba casi inválido, cubierto de pústulas, con los dientes flojos y la mente entre brumas. Las curaciones dantescas de sangrías, mercurio y cauterizaciones del pene con alambres al rojo no lo habían aliviado, pero seguía practicándolas como acto de contrición. Acababa de cumplir cincuenta años y estaba convertido en un anciano que daba órdenes disparatadas, se orinaba sin control y estaba siempre en una hamaca con sus mascotas, un par de negritas que apenas habían alcanzado la pubertad.

Mientras los esclavos desempacaban su equipaje bajo las órdenes del valet, un currutaco que apenas había soportado la travesía en barco y estaba espantado ante las condiciones primitivas del lugar, Toulouse Valmorain salió a recorrer la vasta propiedad. Nada sabía del cultivo de caña, pero le bastó aquel paseo para comprender que los esclavos estaban famélicos y la plantación sólo se había salvado de la ruina porque el mundo consumía azúcar con creciente voracidad. En los libros de contabilidad encontró la explicación de las malas finanzas de su padre, que no podía mantener a la familia en París con el decoro que correspondía a su posición. La producción era un desastre y los esclavos caían como chinches; no le cupo duda de que los capataces robaban aprovechándose del estremecedor deterioro del amo. Maldijo su suerte y se dispuso a arremangarse y trabajar, algo que ningún joven de su medio se planteaba: el trabajo era para otra clase de gente. Empezó por conseguir un suculento préstamo gracias al apoyo y las conexiones con banqueros del agente comercial de su padre, luego mandó a los commandeurs a los cañaverales, a trabajar codo a codo con los mismos a quienes habían martirizado antes y los reemplazó por otros menos depravados, redujo los castigos y contrató a un veterinario, que pasó dos meses en Saint-Lazare tratando de devolver algo de salud a los negros. El veterinario no pudo salvar a su valet, al que despachó una diarrea fulminante en menos de treinta y ocho horas. Valmorain se dio cuenta de que los esclavos de su padre duraban un promedio de dieciocho meses antes de escaparse o caer muertos de fatiga, mucho menos que en otras plantaciones. Las mujeres vivían más que los hombres, pero rendían menos en la labor agobiante de los cañaverales y tenían la mala costumbre de quedar preñadas. Como muy pocos críos sobrevivían, los plantadores habían calculado que la fertilidad entre los negros era tan baja, que no resultaba rentable. El joven Valmorain realizó los cambios necesarios de forma automática, sin planes y deprisa, decidido a irse muy pronto, pero cuando su padre murió, unos meses más tarde, debió enfrentarse al hecho ineludible de que estaba atrapado. No pretendía dejar sus huesos en esa colonia infestada de mosquitos, pero si se marchaba antes de tiempo perdería la plantación y con ella los ingresos y posición social de su familia en Francia.

Valmorain no intentó relacionarse con otros colonos. Los grands blancs, propietarios de otras plantaciones,lo consideraban un presumido que no duraría mucho en la isla; por lo mismo se asombraron al verlo con las botas embarradas y quemado por el sol. La antipatía era mutua. Para Valmorain, esos franceses trasplantados a las Antillas eran unos palurdos, lo opuesto de la sociedad que él había frecuentado, donde se exaltaban las ideas, la ciencia y las artes y nadie hablaba de dinero ni de esclavos. De la «edad de la razón» en París, pasó a hundirse en un mundo primitivo y violento en que los vivos y los muertos andaban de la mano. Tampoco hizo amistad con los petits blancs, cuyo único capital era el color de la piel, unos pobres diablos emponzoñados por la envidia y la maledicencia, como él decía. Provenían de los cuatro puntos cardinales y no había manera de averiguar su pureza de sangre o su pasado. En el mejor de los casos eran mercaderes, artesanos, frailes de poca virtud, marineros, militares y funcionarios menores, pero también había maleantes, chulos, criminales y bucaneros que utilizaban cada recoveco del Caribe para sus canalladas. Nada tenía él en común con esa gente.

Entre los mulatos libres o affranchis existían más de sesenta clasificaciones según el porcentaje de sangre blanca, que determinaba su nivel social. Valmorain nunca logró distinguir los tonos ni aprender la denominación de cada combinación de las dos razas. Los affranchis carecían de poder político, pero manejaban mucho dinero; por eso los blancospobres los odiaban. Algunos se ganaban la vida con tráficos ilícitos, desde contrabando hasta prostitución, pero otros habían sido educados en Francia y poseían fortuna, tierras y esclavos. Porencima de las sutilezas del color, los mulatos estaban unidos por su aspiración común a pasar por blancos y su desprecio visceral por los negros. Los esclavos, cuyo número era diez veces mayor que el de los blancos y affranchis juntos, no contaban para nada, ni en el censo de la población ni en la conciencia de los colonos.

Ya que no le convenía aislarse por completo, Toulouse Valmorain frecuentaba de vez en cuando a algunas familias de grands blancs en Le Cap, la ciudad más cercana a su plantación. En esos viajes compraba lo necesario para abastecerse y, si no podía evitarlo, pasaba por la Asamblea Colonial a saludar a sus pares, así no olvidarían su apellido, pero no participaba en las sesiones. También aprovechaba para ver comedias en el teatro, asistir a fiestas de las cocottes—las exuberantes cortesanas francesas, españolas y de razas mezcladas que dominaban la vida nocturna— y codearse con exploradores y científicos que se detenían en la isla, de paso hacia otros sitios más interesantes. Saint-Domingue no atraía visitantes, pero a veces llegaban algunos a estudiar la naturaleza o la economía de las Antillas, a quienes Valmorain invitaba a Saint-Lazare con la intención de recuperar, aunque fuese brevemente, el placer de la conversación elevada que había aderezado sus años de París. Tres años después de la muerte de su padre podía mostrarles la propiedad con orgullo; había transformado aquel estropicio de negros enfermos y cañaverales secos en una de las plantaciones más prósperas entre las ochocientas de la isla, había multiplicado por cinco el volumen de azúcar sin refinar para exportación e instalado una destilería donde producía selectas barricas de un ron mucho más fino que el que solía beberse. Sus visitantes pasaban una o dos semanas en la rústica casona de madera, empapándose de la vida de campo y apreciando de cerca la mágica invención del azúcar. Se paseaban a caballo entre los densos pastos que silbaban amenazantes por la brisa, protegidos del sol por grandes sombreros de pajilla y boqueando en la humedad hirviente del Caribe, mientras los esclavos, como afiladas sombras, cortaban las plantas a ras de tierra sin matar la raíz, para que hubiera otras cosechas. De lejos, parecían insectos entre los abigarrados cañaverales que los doblaban en altura. La labor de limpiar las duras cañas, picarlas en las máquinas dentadas, estrujarlas en las prensas y hervir el jugo en profundos calderos de cobre para obtener un jarabe oscuro, resultaba fascinante para esa gente de ciudad que sólo había visto los albos cristales que endulzaban el café. Esos visitantes ponían al día a Valmorain sobre los sucesos de Europa, cada vez más remota para él, los nuevos adelantos tecnológicos y científicos y las ideas filosóficas de moda. Le abrían un portillo para que atisbara el mundo y le dejaban de regalo algunos libros. Valmorain disfrutaba con sus huéspedes, pero más disfrutaba cuando se iban; no le gustaba tener testigos en su vida ni en su propiedad. Los extranjeros observaban la esclavitud con una mezcla de repugnancia y morbosa curiosidad que le resultaba ofensiva porque se consideraba un amo justo: si supieran cómo trataban otros plantadores a sus negros, estarían de acuerdo con él. Sabía que más de uno volvería a la civilización
convertido en abolicionista y dispuesto a sabotear el consumo de azúcar. Antes de verse obligado a vivir en la isla también le habría chocado la esclavitud, de haber conocido los detalles, pero su padre nunca se refirió al tema. Ahora, con cientos de esclavos a su cargo, sus ideas al respecto habían cambiado.

Continues...

Excerpted from La isla bajo el mar by Isabel Allende Copyright © 2010 by Isabel Allende. Excerpted by permission of Vintage, a division of Random House, Inc.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 39 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(23)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 39 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2010

    Entertaining

    Anything written by Isabel Allende is entertaining and catchy because once you start reading the book you don't want to put it down.

    I have read all her books and I have yet to be disappointed.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Exelente!!!

    Como toda su obra, de principio a fin, Zarite es un personaje exquisito,lleno de matices, con sentimientos escondidos, disfrasados, pero al mismo tiempo autenticos,y verdaderos.
    El amor todo lo puede.!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2010

    Nice book

    I loved to read this book, same way I love every single book of Ms. Allende.

    Unfortunately I have to returned it to the library I couldn't buy it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2009

    What A Book!!!

    Excellent! Impossible to put down. Hopefully there is sequel soon. A must-have-must-read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2009

    "La 'Selva Imposible'; -Puntualizaciones criticas a Isabel Allende"

    Saludos amigos del mundo:
    Con el titulo que encabeza este comentario publicamos un analisis en el que diferimos del enfoque que se hace de la Isla Hispaniola en aspectos de geografia y flora y fauna; todo ello sin menoscabar el alto valor literario, argumental y estetico de la novela.
    Recomiendo su lectura a fin de que puedan conocer algunas facetas sobre las naciones que comparten la isla (Haiti y Rep. Dominicana).
    Con aprecio,

    Sergio Reyes II. sergioreyII@hotmail.com

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2012

    Muy muy buena

    Una de las mejores e impactantes novelas que he leido.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 11, 2012

    Higly recommended!

    I had a pleasant surprise with this book by Isabel Allende. It's a historic novel about slavery and life in the french-spanish caribbean colonies in the new world. It has different stories of bravery women surrounded by love and life in the XIX century. What a great book! I higlhy recommended it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2011

    Excellent Book! Libro excelente!

    Disfrute mucho la lectura de este libro. Isabel Allende como siempre tiene el poder de atraparnos como lectores con sus historias. Este libro no solo cuenta la vida de una esclava, tambien como sus anteriores personajes femeninos, Zarite muestra una fortaleza increible!. Otro aspecto positivo de este libro es como atraves de la historia de una esclava tambien muestra al lector ese periodo historico de esclavitud. Lo recomiendo 100% por 100%.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 1, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Una Isabelita mas realista...

    Si bien es cierto; En cada pagina escrita por el escritor , se ensartan trocitos de su alma. En esta nueva entrega de Isabel Allende, Narrada con una realidad -isabell (contrario a las entregas anteriores). Nos presenta nuevamente una mujer , una esclava , en los años 1700-1800.A diferencia de las mujeres de sus obras anteriores ,Zarité aunque anida en su alma el deseo punzante de alcanzar esa libertad , que tantas guerras a desembocado en la historia. Se muestra fiel al amor a sus hijos, que no le pertenecen y la fidelidad a un amo que para el,esta no es mas que varias monedas. Esta historia esta plasmada en Saint-Domingue actualmente Haití. Al adentraenos entre los relieves de la misma, nos demuestra que esclavo no solo se define por el color de la piel. Hasta los blancs, affranchis, sang-milee o cualquier tono mas claro que el negro. Eran mas esclavos que los mismos negros de las plantaciones , arrastrados y arrancados de sus tierras en un aire lejano. Aunque aveces nos invade un sentimiento de indigancion y repulsuion al culpar a Zarité (Isabell) de no sublevarse, de someterce , de no ser esa mujer desafiante de lo que escriba su z`etoile. Resplandece la inteligencia de la mujer sabia y sumisa que mantiene su mirada en el piso , pero su alma en los deseos inmaculados de su corazon. Los blancos con sus plantaciones, sus sociedades cerradas. Escalvos de sus propias costumbres y juzgados por su mimsa raza. No amaban con la sangre , no bailaban con el espiritu , ni disfrutaban de sus riquezas. Mientras los esclavos aunque trabajacen bajo el latigo del verdugo o el colmillo de los perro carniceros. En los pocos momentos de tranquilidad que creian poseer y aunque en la realidad mundana no poseian NADA. Eran los unicos libres , al amarse , los unicos libres al ayudarce y los unicos libres al bailar. "Por que esclavo que baila es libre , mientras baila" .

    Nos invade la tristeza cuando narra Zarité el destino final de Rosette. Es casi imposible perderce la nube oscura en el papel , los dedos escritores y dolidos de Isabell. Me atrevo a pensar que talvez llegó tan adentro esta parte de ella misma, que ya no pudo continuar la historia y los destinos de sus personajes se vieron cortados de un salto.

    Me hubiese gustado saber que pasaria con Hortense , esposa del Señor Valmoraine o con el mismo. Con Jean-Martin y demas. TENGO MUCHAS COSAS MAS QEU DECIR, PERO SERá EN MI POCO UPDATED BLOG. www.gilbarrientos.wordpress.com

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 22, 2014

    Muy interesante

    Muy interesante. Aprendi mucho sobre la historia de Haiti y Luisiana, y la esclavitud en los dos lugares.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2013

    Excelente historia y fantasia

    Este libro te cautiva desde el inicio. Puedes oir las voces de los personajes, sentir sus emociones. Te da un buen entendimiento de la vida colonial en aquella epoca y el contraste con la esclavitud y la lucha por la libertad fisica y espiritual.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2013

    Story

    My story will not be posted here!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2012

    Interesante historia pero....

    Sorprendentemente, a pesar de una autora hispana, este libro tine una gran cantidad de faltas de ortografia.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2012

    Vale la pena a pesar de las erratas tipograficas

    Esta novela vuelve a estar a la altura de las primeras de Allende, como la casa de los espiritus. Entreteje personajes de ficcion con los hechos reales y la injusticia fe la esclavitud y la segregacion por cantidad de sangre blanca: negros, mulatos, cuarterones, etc. Lo unico lamentable de la version electronica es que tiene muchos errores de tipografia, como si hubiera fallas en el software de reconocimiento de caracteres. Pero vale la pena por la historia, muy bien documentada y entretenida.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2012

    Me entretuvo...

    En general me gusto la historia. Es ficcion basada en hechos reales. Se nota que la autora se documento muy bien antes de escribir.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2012

    Too many typos

    Interestig story. The only "major" problem I found to be very annoying for me is that the electronic version has lots and lots of typos. Does anybody proofread before publication?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2012

    Great book!

    A fascinating story. Very intense, as all of Isabel Allende’s books. The only complaint I have, is that the electronic version has too many mistakes.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2012

    Super hermoso me dejo fascinsada no te puedes despegar del drama

    Buena literatura y amena me encanto


    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2010

    interestining

    I like Isabel Allende themes.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Mi mama adora a Isabel Allende...

    le encanto este nuevo libro.!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 39 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)