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Labor Day

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With the end of summer closing in and a steamy Labor Day weekend looming in the town of Holton Mills, New Hampshire, thirteen-year-old Henry—lonely, friendless, not too good at sports—spends most of his time watching television, reading, and daydreaming about the soft skin and budding bodies of his female classmates. For company Henry has his long-divorced mother, Adele—a onetime dancer whose summer project was to teach him how to foxtrot; his hamster, Joe; and awkward Saturday-night outings to Friendly's with ...

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Labor Day

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Overview

With the end of summer closing in and a steamy Labor Day weekend looming in the town of Holton Mills, New Hampshire, thirteen-year-old Henry—lonely, friendless, not too good at sports—spends most of his time watching television, reading, and daydreaming about the soft skin and budding bodies of his female classmates. For company Henry has his long-divorced mother, Adele—a onetime dancer whose summer project was to teach him how to foxtrot; his hamster, Joe; and awkward Saturday-night outings to Friendly's with his estranged father and new stepfamily. As much as he tries, Henry knows that even with his jokes and his "Husband for a Day" coupon, he still can't make his emotionally fragile mother happy. Adele has a secret that makes it hard for her to leave their house, and seems to possess an irreparably broken heart.

But all that changes on the Thursday before Labor Day, when a mysterious bleeding man named Frank approaches Henry and asks for a hand. Over the next five days, Henry will learn some of life's most valuable lessons: how to throw a baseball, the secret to perfect piecrust, the breathless pain of jealousy, the power of betrayal, and the importance of putting others—especially those we love—above ourselves. And the knowledge that real love is worth waiting for.

In a manner evoking Ian McEwan's Atonement and Nick Hornby's About a Boy, acclaimed author Joyce Maynard weaves a beautiful, poignant tale of love, sex, adolescence, and devastating treachery as seen through the eyes of a young teenage boy—and the man he later becomes—looking back at an unexpected encounter that begins one single long, hot, life-alteringweekend.

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Editorial Reviews

Gather.com
“Labor Day is a startling novel of love, friendship, trust, treachery, betrayal, and the deep lessons that we learn in life.... It’s a powerful, poignant mix in the hands of author Joyce Maynard and a novel no one should miss.”
MyDailyFind.com
“Labor Day is both a coming-of-age story and a love story- a tale of profound loss, redemption and soul searching that is not to be missed.”
Associated Press
“Maynard is in top form in this tale of love, betrayal, and forgiveness.”
Caroline Preston
It is a testament to Maynard's skill that she makes this ominous setup into a convincing and poignant coming-of-age tale. As she has revealed in her memoirs and five previous novels, Maynard has had her own share of unsuitable attachments. She understands the deep yearnings that drive people to impulsive decisions and sometimes reckless behavior.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

In her sixth novel, Maynard (To Die For) tells the story of a long weekend and its repercussions through the eyes of a then 13-year-old boy, Henry, who lives with his divorced mother, Adele. On Labor Day weekend, Henry manages to coax his mother, who rarely goes out, into a trip to PriceMart, where they run into Frank, who intimidates them into giving him a ride. Frank, it turns out, is an escaped convict looking for a place to hide. He holds Adele and Henry hostage in their home, an experience that changes all of them forever, whether it's Frank tying Adele to the kitchen chair with her silk scarves and lovingly feeding her or teaching the awkward, unathletic Henry how to throw a baseball. The bizarre situation encompasses Henry's budding adolescence, the awakening of his sexuality and his fear of being abandoned by his mother and Frank, who are falling in love and planning to run away together. Maynard's prose is beautiful and her characters winningly complicated, with no neat tie-ups in the end. A sometimes painful tale, but captivating and surprisingly moving. (Aug.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

The summer Henry turned 13, he had many questions about sex, "but it was clear my mother was not the person to discuss this with." A dancer, pretty like Ginger from Gilligan's Island, Adele had withdrawn from the world after her divorce from Henry's dad. Mother and son lead a lonely life together, subsisting on stacks of Cap'n Andy frozen fish dinners while Adele half-heartedly tries to sell vitamins by phone. Adele rarely leaves home, except when pressed to get Henry some last-minute back-to-school clothes. It's at Pricemart that the wounded pair meets Frank, a man with much to teach them about true love, baseball, and the best way to make a ripe peach pie. VERDICT There's a catch, of course—Frank's just escaped from prison, and there's a full-fledged manhunt underway. This coming-of-age story is gentle, unexpected, and simply told. An easy purchase. [The publisher is touting this as a change of pace from the author of To Die For; this was a pick at BookExpo 2009's Librarians' Book Shout and Share program.—Ed.]—Christine Perkins, Bellingham P.L., WA


—Christine Perkins
Kirkus Reviews
A pubescent boy learns about sorrow and regret during one blisteringly hot holiday weekend. Shifts of tone mark the progression of Maynard's latest (Internal Combustion, 2006, etc.). In an unlikely opening, 13-year-old Henry and his mother Adele agree to take home Frank, the bleeding man they meet while shopping at Pricemart. Frank turns out to be an escaped convict-a murderer in fact-yet he is unthreatening and domesticated, soon rustling up the best chili they have ever eaten. Adele, a romantic, has been left slightly unhinged and agoraphobic by her divorce; she and Frank quickly develop a sensual attraction observed by Henry, who is grappling with teenage angst over his sexuality. As the adults become lovers and Frank starts to teach Henry how to catch a baseball, the novel becomes a semi-comic exploration of what constitutes the ideal American family. But then Frank describes the circumstances of his conviction, an implausible chronicle of deception and coincidence that considerably darkens the novel's mood. Henry fears his mother is about to abandon him and shares his anxiety with his anorexic new girlfriend Eleanor, but he is wrong: The plan is for all three to flee to Canada, a plan that Eleanor will stymie. Narrated by the adult Henry 18 years later, the story shows how a boy digests, then uses the lessons learned that hot weekend. Redemption is eventually offered to all parties. Maynard expertly tugs heartstrings in a tidy tale.
Minneapolis Star Tribune
“[A] sweet, swift read that will leave you feeling good.”
New Orleans Times-Picayune
“beautifully written”
People (Four Stars)
“[The] story is moving and fast-moving, affirming Maynard’s reputation as a master storyteller and showing her to be a passionate humanist with a gifted ear and heart. . . . Maynard illuminates the human experience.”
Washington Post
“It is a testament to Maynard’s skill that she makes this ominous setup into a convincing and poignant coming-of-age tale.”
St. Petersburg Times
“an uplifting story told by a boy who is just beginning to understand what life is all about.”
Hartford Courant
“a haunting and hopeful story”
Salt Lake City Tribune
“Maynard gets inside the head of an adolescent boy who is grappling with his own identity and the mysteries of sex (while revealing the secrets of making perfect pie crust). ”
BookPage
“Maynard deftly pulls the reader into the fragile lives of these three vulnerable characters and their preordained march toward the novel’s denouement. A marvelous read––perfect for one long sitting––this novel leaves the reader wishing it didn’t ever have to end.”
NPR.org
“But apart from being a successful thriller, this book is a fascinating portrait of what causes a family to founder, and how much it can cost to put it back on the right path. ”
Smart Money
“Maynard details Henry’s roller-coaster emotions for Frank – he is both jealous and grateful – and his mother’s emotional journeys – with skill and tenderness for the uncertain willingness of broken hearts to mend. The poignant results are revealing of our ability to forgive and to grow.”
Newsday
Labor Day is suffused with tenderness, dreaminess and love....first and foremost a page-turner...[it] puts back together the world that it destroys....you definitely need to get a box of tissues.”
Arizona Republic
“surprisingly moving”
USA Today
“Maynard offers fresh insight into what constitutes family.”
Associated Press Staff
“Maynard is in top form in this tale of love, betrayal, and forgiveness.”
BookPage.com on LABOR DAY
“At once beautiful and disturbing, this remarkable novel…is a moving read.”
People
“[The] story is moving and fast-moving, affirming Maynard’s reputation as a master storyteller and showing her to be a passionate humanist with a gifted ear and heart. . . . Maynard illuminates the human experience.”
www.Gather.com
“Labor Day is a startling novel of love, friendship, trust, treachery, betrayal, and the deep lessons that we learn in life.... It’s a powerful, poignant mix in the hands of author Joyce Maynard and a novel no one should miss.”
www.MyDailyFind.com
“Labor Day is both a coming-of-age story and a love story- a tale of profound loss, redemption and soul searching that is not to be missed.”
Record Searchlight (Redding)
"Maynard...is in top form in this tale of love, betrayal and forgiveness."
Booklist
“Maynard’s inventive coming-of-age tale indelibly captures the anxiety and confusion inherent in adolescence, while the addition of a menacing element of suspense makes this emotionally fraught journey that much more harrowing.”
Jodi Picoult
“Joyce Maynard is in top-notch form with Labor Day. From the perfect pitch of a teenaged boy narrator to the eloquent message of how loneliness can bind people together, this is simply a novel you cannot miss.”
Record Searchlight (Redding
“Maynard...is in top form in this tale of love, betrayal and forgiveness.”
Wichita Falls
“Maynard spins a fascinating story of damaged people seeking the one thing they long for – love. ”
(Four Stars) - People Magazine
"[The] story is moving and fast-moving, affirming Maynard’s reputation as a master storyteller and showing her to be a passionate humanist with a gifted ear and heart. . . . Maynard illuminates the human experience."
Record Searchlight (Redding))
"Maynard...is in top form in this tale of love, betrayal and forgiveness."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061843402
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 7/28/2009
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 6.30 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Joyce Maynard is the author of seven previous novels, including To Die For, Labor Day, and The Good Daughters, and four books of nonfiction. Her bestselling memoir, At Home in the World, has been translated into sixteen languages. Maynard's bestselling novel Labor Day was adapted for film by Academy Award-nominated director Jason Reitman and stars Kate Winslet and Josh Brolin. Maynard makes her home in California.

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Interviews & Essays

How I came to Write My Novel, by Joyce Maynard

I always tell students, when I teach writing, to locate their obsessions, and look to them when they're searching for the story they should be telling. When a writer attaches her work to the engine of what she cares about most passionately (even irrationally, perhaps) the work will be infused with a similar passion, I believe. And come into being most organically.

This new novel of mine-though it's a product of my imagination, not my experience-contains elements of so many of my deepest obsessions. I think that's why I wrote it so easily and swiftly-almost as if I were transcribing a story being dictated to me from inside my brain.

Anyone who has read my work for a while can recognize a few obvious connections to my history, starting with the experience of having been, for many years, a single parent of sons (also a daughter) living in a small town not unlike the imaginary town in which I located the novel. I like to think I have a somewhat more stable and grounded hold on reality and life in the world than Adele (and I am, if anything, the opposite of agoraphobic). But I share a number of her attributes: For starters, there's a hugely romantic nature and a love of dancing (though not her abilities on the dance floor; that part is the stuff of fantasy.) On a deeper level, though, I understand well the sorrow and regret a woman feels when the dream of family life as she envisioned it has left her. My sons-though I like to think they would weigh in with more positive feelings about their growing up years than negative ones-could certainly identify with the feelings Henry has, of undue responsibility for his mother.(Henry's innocent gift, to Adele, of the Husband-for-a-Day coupon was inspired by a similar gift presented to me one Christmas by my son Charlie, when he was around nine or ten.)

I am always interested-no, fascinated-by children's perceptions of the adults in their world. The mysterious subject of sex, the first discovery of one's own sexuality, and the disquieting experience- for a child of divorced parents in particular-of witnessing a parent's sexuality even as they embark on their own sexual lives. Complicated enough, when a child is contemplating the idea of his parents together-but the experience for a young person (a boy in particular) of seeing his mother with some other man is one I have thought about for a long time. (Ever since my son Willy-then age seven-responded to my going out on a date for the first time, after separating from his father, by taking a kitchen knife and plunging it directly into the crotch of a cardboard effigy of the country singer Randy Travis that I had propped up in our front hall . . . Willy is now 24 by the way. A very healthy person who displays no signs of being a psychopath.)

Back to the obsession list. My experience of having gone through a painful custody battle many years ago-and the horrifying experience of being evaluated as a mother by a guardian ad litem-is in there. My history as a teenage girl with eating disorders also surfaced in this story, along with the guilt I carry about a betrayal I committed-at around that time in life-of a classmate's trust in me, when around age fourteen-an event that formed the basis for the first story I ever published in a magazine (Seventeen), somewhere around 1970 . . .

Another experience that found its way into this novel (and one I also wrote about, in non-fiction form, a few years back) was a kind of fantasy love affair I found myself in, when I was myself a young and very lonely single mother, living in a small New Hampshire town with my three young children, and I got a letter (first one, then a hundred more) from a man in prison, who seemed to know and understand me better than anyone else. (I eventually learned-when it appeared he was getting out of prison and coming to visit my children and me-that this man was a double murderer. I first told the story at The Moth in New York, and later wrote it in an essay that appeared in Vogue, and in a collection published a few years back, called Mr. Wrong.)

I will add here, that this is the third time in which I have chosen, for the central character of a novel of mine, a character who is thirteen years old. This is clearly an age that means a lot to me, and though I haven't been thirteen for many decades, I still feel very connected to that time of life.

One odd little obsession that I included in the novel, with particular pleasure, concerns pie. Ever since the death of my mother, nineteen years ago, I have set myself the task of teaching pie-making to anyone I encounter who expresses frustration with making good crust-and the numbers of my past students have long since entered the triple digits. (I have also often run large gatherings of pie students at my home, to raise money for my political candidate. Always a Democrat . . .) I could talk a lot about what this pie exercise means to me-certainly it has to do with my mother, but also with honoring the old ways of doing things by hand, and paying attention to instinct (more than a recipe). And I have to add, I love it that I was able to include, in a work of fiction, instructions for making a pie crust that really will result in a good pie, if followed.

The final obsession I will mention here-and it is the one that inspired my first novel, Baby Love, twenty-eight years ago-is babies. Although I am very different from Adele in many ways, the way she feels about having a baby is how I felt all my life. And what Frank says concerning the importance of paying attention to babies-and later, his thoughts are echoed by Henry, when he becomes a parent of a daughter-is everything I believe, myself. I have never met a baby I didn't like, or a crying baby I didn't feel I could bring to a state of calm. I just like babies a whole lot, and loved writing about that part here.

I want to add: I did not intentionally set out to address any of these topics. They just came out, because they're all the things that interest me most. No doubt this is why I loved writing this novel and wrote it so fast. (I could not stop writing.) I wanted to read it.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 140 )
Rating Distribution

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(44)

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(44)

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(35)

2 Star

(6)

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(11)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 140 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 25, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A fascinating story of damaged people seeking love and acceptance

    Labor Day weekend, for most, is a time for celebration, a last fling before the seriousness of school and fall set in.

    In Joyce Maynard's new novel, "Labor Day," the holiday weekend is not quite a party for one family in a small New Hampshire town. It will be a time of life-altering occurrences that would shape their futures forever.

    Thirteen year old Henry and his mother, Adele, are shopping for school items when they are approached by a bleeding man asking for their help. So they take him home, to find out later that the man, Frank, is an escaped convict on the run. He somehow cajoles Adele into letting him stay while the police search for him, and she agrees. This would be the beginning of a six-day odyssey for Henry and his mother that neither of them could ever have imagined.

    As the story unfolds, through Henry's voice, the reader is taken through Henry's family history of a bitter divorce, miscarried babies, remarriage and new siblings and his mother's gradual loss of her grip on reality. It seems as if Frank is somewhat of a savior come to turn their lives around. He gives Henry the attention that he craves from a father-figure, and to Adele he gives companionship and adoration that she has been without for so long.

    In a mesmerizing way, Frank weaves his way into their lives, making beautiful promises that he could never keep. When Henry begins to realize that this idyllic situation is doomed, it's up to him, as man of the house, to save his mother from certain heartbreak, if not incarceration.

    Maynard spins a fascinating story of damaged people seeking the one thing they long for - love. It's intriguing to watch these characters go through their paces, all the time wanting to yell at them "don't you know what's going on here?" and "how could you be so stupid?" But wrapping her tale up with a satisfying ending, the reader can take away a sense of completion for Henry's family and that is a gift in itself.

    - Sharon Galligar Chance (http://sharonsgardenofbookreviews.blogspot.com)

    22 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2014

    Harriet klausner

    And here comes harriet klausner with her cliff note book report ruining another book. Please bn, ban this poster and delete all her plot spoiling posts. They totally ruin every book she touches.

    16 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    I Loved This Book!

    I couldn't put this book down! The depth of the characters are great! The story is so sad, yet very touching....I couldn't stop the tears! I really liked the ending! This author is a great writer! Don't miss this one!

    11 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2014

    Why

    Why do these people write a review tellingbthe WHOLE story??????? Do they not realize it ruins it for us who havent read it yet? These people should not be allowed to write more than like 100word review!! I am now very disappointed! Thanks again you know who you are you ruin every singke book that you read by writing the whole story in ur review! Well B&N u can thank her for me once again not purchasing ANOTHER book from me!!!!!!! :(

    10 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    This is a story about love, loss and the struggle to find yourself. It's proof that in this great big world, it is possible to find happiness and a place to call home.

    Henry is thirteen-years-old and a bit of a recluse. As the other boys in the neighborhood spend their time outside, Henry spends his time indoors, watching TV and taking care of his divorced mother, Adele. Their meals consist of canned soup and quiet conversation. This is a typical day for them. However, during one, long, hot Labor Day weekend, they head to the local Pricemart to pick up a few items. This, in itself, is rare as Adele does not enjoy being outside anymore. She'd rather stay in the comfort of her home but on this particular morning, she decides to enter the store with Henry.

    While she is shopping, Henry is confronted by a man named Frank. The man, obviously injured, is in pain and simply asks if Henry and his mom can help him. Although Adele has her issues, she has been known to help those in need in the past, so Henry takes Frank to his mom, and their lives change forever.

    Frank has a story of course. A sketchy past involving a mistake he made when he was younger, but through Frank's actions, Adele sees a man who is solid and true. A man who cares deeply for those close to him, and when he manages to bring happiness into their home, happiness that hasn't existed for years, Henry becomes fond of him too.

    Labor Day is a wonderful read. The characters are forced to look within themselves and the interactions between them are so beautifully orchestrated. I say orchestrated because their interactions are seamless and subtle but speak volumes as far as what's going on within these people. It takes an author's delicate hand to push that envelope. Pushing it too much creates a "staged" feel and not pushing it enough creates hollow characters without substance.

    Labor Day is my favorite type of book. It's the kind of book that you read, experience and then once done, think about for days on end. I highly recommend it.

    10 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 29, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This is a super character study

    On the Labor day weekend in 1987, thirteen year old Henry persuades his single mother Adele to leave their dump for a trip to the nearby PriceMart. He is ecstatic when she agrees as she never leaves their home except if she absolutely has to since his dad left her and remarried.

    They meet Frank, who bullies them into picking him up. An escaped convict, Frank needs a place to hide from the law so he coerces the mother and son to take him into their home or else. However, as he holds them prisoner in their home, the trio forges a relationship with him in charge. He tenderly ties Adele to a chair using her silk scarves as gentle ropes; while feeding her. He teaches Henry, who hates sports as he stinks at them, to throw a baseball. He soon finds he wants more from the mom as they fall in love and consider fleeing together, and with her son who fears desertion from his mom and his surrogate father.

    This is a super character study that focuses on the changing relations between three protagonists over the Labor Day weekend. A Stockholm syndrome effect occurs as each grows closer to one another. Henry is the glue that keeps the story line focused as he admires Frank's courage and mentoring skills while also fears he will take his mom with him leaving her son behind when he goes on the lam. Fans will relish three seemingly losers finding something special during the long weekend together even as each anticipates no happy ending (the Sword of Damocles always lurking during the holiday) ;instead they expect to pay a steep price for six days and five nights of a fairy tale.

    Harriet Klausner

    10 out of 31 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2011

    Seriously Flawed, but ....

    Joyce Maynard's Labor Day is a seriously flawed book, a disappointment in so many ways. But... The book is written from the viewpoint of a 13 year old boy except for the last 30 pages. She manages to write that quite convincingly. There seemed to be honesty in the emotions expressed. Some of the characters are three dimensional, though most aren't. So what are the flaws. Frank is a saint, not a bad bone in his body. Everybody has a few bad bones. The timing is far too condensed, only 6 days. But many books that have a romantic edge commit the same error. Then I think the editor should be shot. There were whole chunks of the story that really felt like they had been chopped out. They'd been written and then dropped, particularly some references to baseball. In a particularly egregious error, cellos don't have frets! So the editor thinks that the guitar which Ms. Maynard had originally written was too plebeian. "Let's change it to a cello". At least do the follow up work. But with all of that, the story resolves in better ways than it might have. And there are interests maintained. I can't recommend it. But I can't trash it, despite its flaws.

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2009

    I LOVED THIS BOOK

    STORY WAS VERY TOUCHING AND KEPT ME WANTING MORE. THE STORY STAYED WITH ME A FEW DAYS AFTER I FINISHED THE BOOK.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2013

    Maynard's characters were so real, i could picture them with eas

    Maynard's characters were so real, i could picture them with ease.  Labor day is funny, warm, awakening emotions through the vivid characters.  The author's passions are, indeed, most evident in this wonderful story. 

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 15, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    So many great reviews I admit I really struggled through

    This is my first read by this author and thought it was a strong writing style and well developed characters I just really struggled with the story I think. It was hard for me to believe from the beginning and found myself disappointed I guess throughout most of it. The flow is a little weak for me at the end when such a short time of the story is drug on through so many chapters and then BAM we fly through adulthood. I would have rather had a little more leading up to his adult life or nothing at all and ended in his youth, just made it feel too rushed at the end. Hard book for me enjoy, Sorry!

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2009

    LABOR DAY

    GREAT BOOK HARD TO PUT DOWN SOLID CHARACTERS, LOVE IT.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2009

    Labor Day weekend

    This book is about a mother and her son who let an escaped fugitive into their home for the Labor Day weekend. The mother and son have very few friends. The book centers on how the characters interact with each other while trying to stay as low key as possible. This is a good book about love and forgiveness and well worth reading.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    Anonymous

    I really liked this story. For those who reviewed the book and said it was unbelieveable, isn't that why you read and go to movies? It nice to let go and just enjoy the story. Things don't always have to be authentic to be enjoyable. I would highly recom.end this book.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2014

    Something lacking

    It took me about 100 pages to get into the book. But even after that, there was still something missing. As a reader, i want a book that as i read it i put myself in a characters situation and i couldn't in this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 13, 2013

    Loved it

    Bought it after I saw a screening of the film. I liked it better. All written in the first person voice of the young boy at the heart of the story, it's an exposition on how love can come even to those that are broken and damaged.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2012

    Okay

    Somewhat slow. 3.5 stars.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 23, 2011

    One of my favorites

    I loved this book. It was great read and held my attention from start to finish. Could barely put it down!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2010

    A Sweet Romance

    This story is about a woman, with her young son, who meets a man in a store and because he needs help, takes him to their home she shares with her son. This is the only unrealistic issue with this book. Her doing this is a contradiction to her carefully raising her son to protect him from some of society's evils. If you can get past this point, it's a lovely story. The mom, boy and man all basically fall in love. As the story twists and turns, you begin to see that this may not work out for any of them, but hang in there and the ending will surprise and delight you. The story is well written and quickly creates empathy for the characters involved. It moves at just the right pace, and I plan on reading other novels by this author. Hope you enjoy it!

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2014

    Labor day

    Ithink i will love it i will read it in 7 days the day my mom and stepdad comes back

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2014

    Good story

    Loved the ending. Didnt want it to end. I will ck out other books by this author.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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