Laboratory Atlas in Anatomy and Physiology

Laboratory Atlas in Anatomy and Physiology

by Douglas J. Eder, Bertran, Kaninsky
     
 

Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Larry R. Cochard, PhD (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine)
Description: You can't judge a book by its cover. In this new atlas of anatomy and physiology, there is little of the latter, and though the human muscular system is depicted on the front, the manual is for beginning anatomy courses that feature dissection of the cat.
Purpose: There is no preface, but the topics indicate a broad introduction to anatomy where structure in the human is related to the anatomy of the cat, fetal pig, and rat. The emphasis is on histology and the musculoskeletal system.
Audience: This book is for undergraduates in a variety of programs who want some anatomy experience.
Features: There are five sections in the atlas color-coded at the top of the pages for easy location. The first is a sizable section of nice histological photographs of tissues and samples of most organs. They are labeled and have brief descriptions. The next two sections are labeled paintings of human bones and muscles, respectively. Skull bones are shown individually and colored in situ. Major joints are also covered. Chapter 4 has 32 pages of mostly high-quality photographs of cat dissections and 12 pages on the fetal pig and rat. The last section consists of reference tables on human muscle functions and innervation, sex differences in the skeleton, cell organelle functions, and other topics. The "physiology" in the title probably refers to the tables on transport processes, events of muscle contraction, nerve functions, and the actions of pituitary gland hormones.
Assessment: The authors do a nice job with what they have included in this atlas, but their selection of topics (histology, detailed human skull structure, cat, etc.) is curious. It would be more useful with small sections on other human body systems, development, and perhaps primitive vertebrate osteology or comparative anatomy.
3 Stars from Doody
Larry R. Cochard
You can't judge a book by its cover. In this new atlas of anatomy and physiology, there is little of the latter, and though the human muscular system is depicted on the front, the manual is for beginning anatomy courses that feature dissection of the cat. There is no preface, but the topics indicate a broad introduction to anatomy where structure in the human is related to the anatomy of the cat, fetal pig, and rat. The emphasis is on histology and the musculoskeletal system. This book is for undergraduates in a variety of programs who want some anatomy experience. There are five sections in the atlas color-coded at the top of the pages for easy location. The first is a sizable section of nice histological photographs of tissues and samples of most organs. They are labeled and have brief descriptions. The next two sections are labeled paintings of human bones and muscles, respectively. Skull bones are shown individually and colored in situ. Major joints are also covered. Chapter 4 has 32 pages of mostly high-quality photographs of cat dissections and 12 pages on the fetal pig and rat. The last section consists of reference tables on human muscle functions and innervation, sex differences in the skeleton, cell organelle functions, and other topics. The ""physiology"" in the title probably refers to the tables on transport processes, events of muscle contraction, nerve functions, and the actions of pituitary gland hormones. The authors do a nice job with what they have included in this atlas, but their selection of topics (histology, detailed human skull structure, cat, etc.) is curious. It would be more useful with small sections on other human body systems, development, and perhapsprimitive vertebrate osteology or comparative anatomy.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780801670510
Publisher:
Mosby, Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/1994
Pages:
156
Age Range:
18 Years

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