Labyrinth of Dreaming Books: A Novel

Labyrinth of Dreaming Books: A Novel

4.0 3
by Walter Moers
     
 

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It has been more than two hundred years since Bookholm was destroyed by a devastating fire, as told in Moers's The City of Dreaming Books.
Hildegunst von Mythenmetz, hailed as Zamonia's greatest writer, is on vacation in Lindworm Castle when a disturbing message reaches him, and he must return to Bookholm to investigate a mystery. The magnificently rebuilt city

Overview

It has been more than two hundred years since Bookholm was destroyed by a devastating fire, as told in Moers's The City of Dreaming Books.
Hildegunst von Mythenmetz, hailed as Zamonia's greatest writer, is on vacation in Lindworm Castle when a disturbing message reaches him, and he must return to Bookholm to investigate a mystery. The magnificently rebuilt city has once again become a metropolis of storytelling and the book trade. Mythenmetz encounters old friends and new denizens of the city—and the shadowy "Invisible Theater." Astonishingly inventive, amusing, and engrossing, this is a captivating story from the wild imagination of Walter Moers.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Cheerfully insane… Lively and inventive." — The New York Times

"A yarn of drollery, deeper meaning, and sheer lunacy." — Rolling Stone

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781468307146
Publisher:
The Overlook Press
Publication date:
10/29/2013
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
260,285
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Walter Moers is the author of The 13 1/2 Lives of Captain Bluebear, Rumo, A Wild Ride Through the Night, The City of Dreaming Books, and The Alchemaster's Apprentice, all published by Overlook.

John Brown is the award-winning translator of Walter Moers, Michael Ende, and many other German writers.

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Labyrinth of Dreaming Books 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
VoxLegio More than 1 year ago
This is yet another 400 page walnut-cracker set in the bizarre and hilarious world of Walter Moers' Zamonia. The sequel to "The City of Dreaming Books," it picks up several hundred years after the events of CoDB where we find Optimus Yarnspinner on yet another trip to the City. Within its pages are Moers' digressions, lists, and delightful illustrations that are his trademark. What is missing is a plot, because, at the end of this giant tome, the author reveals that due to certain practical constraints, he was forced to turn what he planned to be one book into two. In effect, this book is a 400 page prologue to the actual book you thought you were reading. (Fans of Moers might not be entirely surprised he could write such a thing, digressions upon digressions!) This might not have been too disappointing, but getting through the last hundred pages to find out that they were merely about Zamonian Puppetry, the history and practice of, and weren't really leading up to something besides the next book was pretty disappointing. All of that said, Labyrinth of Dreaming Books does appear to be necessary reading for the next book, and does leave one very, very excited for its future release.
beatlebum More than 1 year ago
I am a huge fan of Walter Moers work, so it's no surprise that I was completely engaged and entertained by The Labyrinth of Dreaming Books. Although it has been a few years since I read The City of Dreaming Books, I found that I didn't need to recall too much of that story to appreciate this one. However, I did feel a desire to reread TCODB because I'd forgotten MANY details that would enhance the setup of this story. Optimus Yarnspinner has returned to Bookholm to experience what has become a new city since it's destruction by the Shadow King and the great fire. There Optimus meets interesting characters and worlds within Bookholm that set him on a path to research a new topic for his next book. Yes, like any Walter Moers book, the story goes off on tangents that leave you wondering when you'll eventually return to the plotline - but the details surrounding these tangents are every bit as interesting as the story we are leaving behind, albeit a little tedious. The last chapters in this book make up for all that wandering and the ending (?!) had me frantically searching online for the release date of the next book. In summary: Read if you are already a fan of Walter Moers and his writing style. If you're not there yet, try The Alchemaster's Apprentice first.
Hermes_Oshlock More than 1 year ago
Moers yet again captured my attention with this terrific read. He is a great author and I love how he described the puppet theater. I can't wait for the sequel.