Ladies' Man

( 27 )

Overview

The moment she spies the rugged hunk in the faded jeans at the airport, Ellen knows she should run for cover. Instead, she throws caution to the wind and plunges into a sizzling affair with the gorgeous cop. Between romantic dinners, sensual limo rides, and a perfect night of passion, Ellen is living every woman’s fantasy. Until she’s caught in the sights of a deranged stalker, and the divorced single mother is suddenly turning to N.Y.P.D. detective Sam Schaefer for her very survival.…Soon Sam’s taking a bullet ...

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Ladies' Man

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Overview

The moment she spies the rugged hunk in the faded jeans at the airport, Ellen knows she should run for cover. Instead, she throws caution to the wind and plunges into a sizzling affair with the gorgeous cop. Between romantic dinners, sensual limo rides, and a perfect night of passion, Ellen is living every woman’s fantasy. Until she’s caught in the sights of a deranged stalker, and the divorced single mother is suddenly turning to N.Y.P.D. detective Sam Schaefer for her very survival.…Soon Sam’s taking a bullet meant for Ellen, and racing against time to stop a killer from hitting his target. Keeping Ellen safe will take everything he’s got. Earning her trust could be a mission impossible, as two wary hearts team up for a summer they’ll never forget—and a sizzling adventure that could get them both killed…or give them everything they’ve ever wanted.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780739340875
  • Publisher: Books on Tape, Inc.
  • Publication date: 2/12/2008
  • Format: MP3
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Ships to U.S.and APO/FPO addresses only.

Meet the Author

Suzanne Brockmann
Since her explosion onto the publishing scene more than ten years ago, Suzanne Brockmann has written more than forty books, and is now widely recognized as one of the leading voices in romantic suspense. Her work has earned her repeated appearances on the USA Today and New York Times bestseller lists, as well as numerous awards, including Romance Writers of America’s #1 Favorite Book of the Year–three years running in 2000, 2001, and 2002–two RITA awards, and many Romantic Times Reviewer’s Choice Awards. Suzanne lives west of Boston with her husband and two children. Visit her website at www.suzannebrockmann.com.

From the Hardcover edition.

Biography

Although Suzanne Brockmann can't remember a time when she wasn't scribbling something (one of her earliest masterpieces was an action-packed radio play called "Mice on Mars"), she didn't begin to write seriously until she was married with young children. She spent several years trying to break into the super-competitive field of screenwriting before deciding to try her hand at genre fiction; and, it was only after months of intensive research that she finally homed in on Romance. In June of 1992, she sat down to write her first book. By year's end, she had completed ten manuscripts, and in August of 1993, she sold her first book, the contemporary romance Future Perfect.

Brockmann's first novels were stand-alones. But as her career progressed, she noticed that romance mini-series, with their opportunities for character development and intersecting story lines, had become extremely popular. Seeking to increase her readership, she decided to write a mini-series of her own. She found her "hook" in a magazine article on Navy SEALs and, in 1996, she released Prince Joe, the first novel in her Tall, Dark and Dangerous series. The alpha males of Brockmann's fictional SEAL Team 10 proved to be the perfect romantic heroes, and the series was an immediate hit with readers. Four years later, she launched a second series of military/romantic thrillers centered on the friendships, romances, and working relationships among a team of Navy SEALS and members of an elite security agency called Troubleshooters, Inc. Starting with The Unsung Hero in 2000, the Troubleshooters books have catapulted the author to the top of the charts.

Brockmann is known in the industry as a risk-taker, having written stories around such sensitive topics as interracial romance and homosexuality, In 2004, she garnered attention for her eighth Troubleshooters novel, Hot Target, which involved one of her most popular recurring characters, openly gay FBI agent Jules Cassidy, in a romantic subplot. Brockman, who dedicated the book to her gay son Jason, was not sure how readers would respond. To her surprise, the reaction from gay and straight alike proved positive. She stated on her website: "I love the fact that the world I've created in my books -- a diverse American world filled with the same variety of people who live in my urban American neighborhood -- has been so enthusiastically embraced by readers."

Brockmann's distinctive literary blend has come in for its fair share of praise. Writing in the Chicago Tribune, veteran Booklist reviewer John Charles stated: "Brockmann strikes the perfect balance between white-knuckle suspense and richly emotional romance." And USA Today has called her "[t]he reigning queen of militaray suspense." As further proof of her mainstream appeal, she remains one of a handful of Romance novelists to have made the leap from mass market paperback to hardcover.

Good To Know

In an interview with the online magazine All About Romance, Brockmann says: "I started reading when I was three (my first 'real' book was Beverly Cleary's Here Comes the Bus -- I remember this because no one believed that I was really reading it and I got really upset when my older sister took it back to the school library before I'd finished it!)."

A serious history buff from her youth, Brockmann has read widely on WWII and has been known to incorporate stories from that era into the books of her Troubleshooters series.

Brockmann loves music. She attended Boston University as a film major with a minor in creative writing but dropped out to perform with a rock and roll band. She also sang with and served as music director for a Boston-based a cappella group called "Serious Fun" and produced its first and only CD in 1998.

Brockman is married to novelist Ed Gaffney.

The mother of an openly gay son , Brockmann is a proud member of PFLAG (Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians & Gays).

In her writing, Brockmann employs a device she calls Deep Point of View. She explains it in an interview with the online writers' journal Writers Write: "In my books, I use subjective point of view, but I'm not satisfied with merely showing the reader what that camera sees from its perch atop a character's head. I bring the camera down, inside of that character's head, so we see the world through that character's eyes. We hear things through his ears. We smell what he smells, feel what he feels, think what he think. With deep POV, I write using words that that character would use. I tell the story with that character's voice."

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Ellen Layne knew it was a mistake to leave the house without a book.

But her uncle Bob had insisted there wouldn't be a single moment of downtime all evening--a quick trip in the limo to Kennedy Airport, intercept Great-Aunt Alma as she began her three-hour stopover before her flight to London, dinner at one of the airport restaurants, then back home after tucking Alma safely on the red-eye to England.

They would watch the tape of last night's show on the VCR in the stretch limousine, he'd told her. And even though Ellen had already watched her legendary uncle's late night talk show when it aired, she knew he wouldn't appreciate her reading while his face was on the screen.

Bob Osborne, the king of late night television, was good at an awful lot of things, but being ignored wasn't on the list.

So now here she was, in Kennedy Airport, waiting for a flight from Chicago that had been delayed for an hour, with nothing whatsoever to read.

It was something of a fluke that they were even here. Bob was supposed to be in Boston preparing for next week's broadcast of his show from Faneuil Hall, and Ellen had an acting class that usually ran from six to nine. So Bob had made arrangements for someone else to meet Alma's plane. But then her acting coach had gotten cast in a local film and the class had been canceled, and Bob had been called back to New York this afternoon for a meeting with his network's executives, so here they were.

And Ellen was here without a book.

Bob was happy as a little clam, interrogating the security guards who X-rayed the carry-on luggage and ran metal detectors over people who set the walk-through gates abuzz. His team of bodyguards--who doubled as both built-in audience and straight men--hovered nearby.

Ellen had escaped and now headed for one of the airport newsstands, hoping they would have something that she hadn't yet read.

There was a book rack that held all of the New York Times bestsellers and then some, but what really caught her eye was the young man standing in front of it.

From the back he was a living, breathing advertisement for Buns of Steel. He was wearing softly faded blue jeans with a white button-down shirt tucked into the waist. His shirtsleeves were rolled up and his sport jacket hung casually over one shoulder.

His hair was blond and thick and wavy, and longish in the back, spilling over his collar. It was the kind of hair that was meant to be touched.

Ellen stood next to him and, gazing up at the rows of books, risked a sidelong glance.

He was even better looking from the front.

His profile was something to write poetry about, with a long, straight, elegantly shaped nose and an exceedingly firm chin and . . .

Oh, perfect--he'd caught her staring.

Feeling the heat of a blush on her cheeks, Ellen reached for the nearest book and flipped through it.

"That's a good one," the man said. His voice was husky and rich, with only the slightest trace of urban New York. He was even younger than she'd first thought--probably not much more than twenty-five or twenty-six.

She had probably been ten years old when he was born. That was a sobering thought. She'd worked as a mother's helper when she was ten, and she'd frequently changed the diapers of a baby boy who was probably around this young...

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 27 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 28, 2009

    nice read

    I really liked this book, but than I like most of her books. Suzanne writes so well, really keeps you into it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2008

    Suzanne Brockmann's "Ladies' Man" is a good read.

    I just read this book to give me something to do while my husband is on a temporary deployment to Tampa. It was a good book. It kept me guessing until the very end. And of course I'm a sap for happy endings, which it has. I would recommend this book especially to read on rainy days or when you're just trying to pass time.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2006

    Perdictable

    This book had potential to be erotic. It was Romantic, but boring. Sam's character had potential to be 'HAWT' and Ellen could've been sexier. But I was bored, throughout. This was an easy no frills 'quick read'. I won't pick up Suzanne Brockmann again, this was weak.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2006

    Wonderful story

    Ladies Man by Suzanne Brockmann is finally back in print. It¿s a wonderfully told tale of love and trusting oneself. ______________________ College Professor Ellen Layne is spending the summer in NY with her two children. They are all pursuing acting careers this summer. As a favor to her talk show host uncle Bob Osbourne, she agrees to pick up her Aunt at the airport. While waiting she starts a harmless flirtation with a younger man. ______________________ Detective Sam Schaefer, as a kindness to his author friend T.S. Harrison agrees to meet Bob Osbourne¿s Aunt Alma. Sam is drawn to Ellen but she is still gun shy from her painful divorce. _____________________ When Sam is made aware of threats to Ellen, the cop in him takes over. Can he convince her to trust him with her life as well as her heart? ___________________ Though Ladies Man was originally written in 1997, I didn¿t find it dated at all. It was a romance for any time. Its exceptionally written and a delight for any romance fan.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 31, 2006

    Great romantic suspense

    Ellen is at the airport to meet up for one of her Great Aunts as a favor to her famous Uncle, whom she and her 2 children are living with for the summer in NYC. While waiting for the delayed plane she regrets not having brought a book with her and wanders off to one of the airport book stores. There she spies the ruggedly handsome man standing looking at books by one of her favorite authors. He tries a couple of pick up lines with her after being drawn to her. The initially don¿t work, but when they are thrown together in a limo for more than 2 hours things take a change for the better in his mind. She throws caution to the wind and decides that a one night stand with an amazingly good looking man will finally help to exercise the demons of her bad marriage. Sam doesn¿t want it to be a one night stand. He is drawn to Ellen as he has never been before. But, he is also facing something new to him, someone who says no to him. Sam¿s best friend is writing the biography of Ellen¿s uncle and he begs his friend to help him out. When it is apparent that Ellen is concerned about some nasty fan letters that Bob is getting TS suggests they call his friend Detective Sam. Sam comes and looks at the information and is immediately concerned for the safety of Ellen. Sam is shocked to find Ellen has 2 kids but takes this in stride and sets out to 1 ¿ Keep Ellen, Bob and Ellen¿s kids safe 2 ¿ Prove to Ellen they he is not to young for a relationship 3 ¿ Show Ellen that he won¿t hurt her, and is in fact in love with her When Sam and Bob are caught in a fire, which looks like it is meant to kill Bob, Ellen looks like she might change her mind and let Sam into her heart and life. But, again she pushes him away. Now though it looks like the stalker is not after Bob but Ellen herself. When Ellen¿s son is almost kidnapped she really panics and finally starts to take the threats seriously.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2006

    fine romantic suspense

    Yale Professor Ellen Layne and her TV host Uncle Bob Osborne wait for her Great Aunt Alma to land in New York. Ellen goes to a bookstore where a handsome stranger suggests she read anything by T.S. Harrison before he asks for her number realizing he is ten years younger than her and that she had two teenage children, Jamie and Lydia, she refuses. Not long afterward, the man meets Bob, who thinks he is Harrison. Unable to get a word in otherwise, NYPD Detective Sam Schaeffer is introduced to Alma as her favorite author. Ellen gives him a ride in her uncle¿s Limo where Sam explains that T.S. is his best friend who could not make it, but neither Bob nor Alma would let him speak. Unable to resist, they make love in the back seat of the limo, but afterward she refuses to give him her number as she feels he is too young for her. --- T.S. explains to Bob what happened at the airport Bob still wants the writer to do his biography. Ellen mentions a security breach, death threat letters and obscene calls. T.S. asks Sam to assess the danger. Sam believes the threat is towards Ellen, whose commercial just aired on TV. Later Sam is stunned when he meets her two kids, but handles it gracefully as he becomes their escort while someone dangerous stalks her and her kids. --- The relationship between the lead characters is passionate and adding to the freshness is she is a decade older than he. The support cast is solid as the teens are adjusted and Bob and T.S. are caring souls. The climax though containing a delightful twist and a five degrees spin seems abrupt, but readers will still appreciate this fine romantic suspense. --- Harriet Klausner

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    Posted July 24, 2010

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