Lady Athlyne

Lady Athlyne

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by Bram Stoker
     
 

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Joy Ogilvie, the beautiful young daughter of a Kentucky colonel, plays a joke with her friends, pretending to be "Lady Athlyne", after hearing a story about the dashing Irish nobleman Lord Athlyne. Little does she know that half a world away, the real Lord Athlyne is a prisoner of war in a South African camp, where word reaches him that a woman in America is

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Overview

Joy Ogilvie, the beautiful young daughter of a Kentucky colonel, plays a joke with her friends, pretending to be "Lady Athlyne", after hearing a story about the dashing Irish nobleman Lord Athlyne. Little does she know that half a world away, the real Lord Athlyne is a prisoner of war in a South African camp, where word reaches him that a woman in America is impersonating his wife.

Upon his release, he decides to investigate the situation and travels to New York, where a near-fatal accident introduces him to Joy and her father. Athlyne and Joy fall instantly in love-but a series of misadventures and dangerous obstacles threatens to prevent their marriage. And when Colonel Ogilvie learns of their affair and challenges Athlyne to a duel to the death, their love just may end in tragedy!

One of the most remarkable treatments of the theme of mutual and passionate love in English literature, Lady Athlyne reveals Stoker to be a versatile and multi-dimensional author. Poorly received upon its initial release in 1908, it has remained out of print and unobtainable for a century. This Valancourt Books edition follows the text of the exceedingly rare 1908 New York edition held by the Library of Congress.

About the Author

Bram Stoker (1847-1812) is best known for his horror novels Dracula (1897), Lady of the Shroud (1909), and Lair of the White Worm (1911), although he also wrote a number of romantic adventure novels, including The Snake's Pass (1890), The Mystery of the Sea (1902), and Lady Athlyne (1908).

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780979233241
Publisher:
Valancourt Books
Publication date:
01/22/2007
Pages:
284
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.64(d)

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Lady Athlyne 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Talekyn More than 1 year ago
I'm a huge Bram Stoker fan. I've reread Dracula, The Lair of the White Worm, The Jewel of the Seven Stars and various of Stoker's short stories countless times since middle school, and a few years back decided that I needed to read his lesser-known work. I read his romance The Snake's Pass and enjoyed it well enough. I decided to tackle Lady Athlyne next and ... it's been a struggle. So much so that this is the one booked named in my 2014 "To Be Read" Challenge that I didn't actually finish in 2014. But I made the push and finished the book in January 2015 instead. At least I can say I read it. But the two star rating should clue people in that this really wasn't an enjoyable experience. Stoker is known for being drawn-out and sometimes repetitive (Dracula certainly has its share of both types of moments and yet it remains one of my all-time favorite novels), but Lady Athlyne brings those quirks into sharp light. This is a story that could have been told in half the pages and been much more compelling -- all the author would have needed to do was cut all the pages in which there was no character or plot development because he was too busy pontificating on the Nature of Love (or the Nature of Womanhood, Girlhood, Manhood, Family, Society, etc.). I think ultimately this is why the book was such a struggle for me: the constant digressions bringing the plot and character development to a complete stop. Every time it happened, I found myself setting the book aside to do/read/listen to something else. I finally bulled my way through, skimming the Pontificating Pages and watching for plot or character progression moments. I liked the naive Joy Ogilvie and the dashing Lord Athlyne (who manages, through family history, to be an English, Irish and Scottish lord, and seems distantly related to Lucy Westenra from Dracula). I had no problem with the frequent road-blocks the author threw in their path to a happy ending, including Joy's over-the-top, masculine, easily-offended charicature of a father; this is a romance after all and so things should not go smoothly for Our Heroine and her Man. But those digressions hurt my overall opinion of the book.