The Lady of Shalott

( 3 )

Overview

The Lady of Shalott is the third book in Visions in Poetry, an award-winning series of classic poems illustrated by outstanding contemporary artists in stunning hardcover editions. Tennyson's beautiful and enigmatic poem of unrequited love, set in Arthurian England, has enthralled artists for well over a century. With her luminous illustrations, Genevi?ve C?t? weaves a refreshingly modern interpretation of this beloved poem -- one that will enchant readers of all ages.
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The Lady of Shalott

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Overview

The Lady of Shalott is the third book in Visions in Poetry, an award-winning series of classic poems illustrated by outstanding contemporary artists in stunning hardcover editions. Tennyson's beautiful and enigmatic poem of unrequited love, set in Arthurian England, has enthralled artists for well over a century. With her luminous illustrations, Genevi?ve C?t? weaves a refreshingly modern interpretation of this beloved poem -- one that will enchant readers of all ages.
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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Tennyson's poem, first published in 1832, marked the beginning of his fascination with the Arthurian legends and his vast influence on writers and painters of the Victorian era. Inspired by a 14th-century Italian novella, The Lady of Shalott is distinguished by its luxurious images, its skillful use of rhyme, and its rhythmic, almost hypnotic repetition of the words "Shalott" and "Camelot." Critics have speculated that the poet was commenting on the circumscribed lives of women of his day, or perhaps on the fate of the isolated artist, or even on the passage from life to death. Canadian artist Cote has used wispy, crayon-like lines, sky blues and warm browns to delineate the maiden and the sights she glimpses in her mirror, with stark black dramatizing Lancelot's appearance, the cracking of the mirror, and the dark river on which the lady floats in a sort of chrysalis, freed as a butterfly by death. What can it mean to young adults of today? Knights wearing leather coats and driving Edwardian motorcars may spark discussion on the relevance of the poem to Tennyson's own time; sinister reapers in sunglasses and the casual acceptance of the lady's death may suggest a link with ours. For the connection with women, artists, and death, interested teens might like to read A Circle of Sisters by Judith Flanders and look at some Pre-Raphaelite depictions of Arthurian characters. Or they might want just to enjoy its elegant and ethereal evocation of temps passe, whether Arthur's or Tennyson's. 2005, KCP Poetry/Kids Can, Ages 13 up.
—Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up-This lyrical poem, written nearly 200 years ago, has been given new life through Cote's intelligent artistry. Tennyson's strict stanzas move back and forth in dialogue with the playful, stylized, mixed-media illustrations. The poem's symbolism has been interpreted variously as a work about the isolation of the artist, the inevitability of death, and unrequited love. The art offers room for readers to wander and wonder within the realm of suggestion. Cote's illustrations allow the poem to speak its full range; however, the theme of love is strongly suggested by the depiction of a couple on the opening page glancing over the water to the island where the Lady of Shalott resides alone. Admirably, the art does not depict the Lady of Shalott as a tragic figure; after she declares that she is `"half sick of shadows,"' she takes flight from the world of mirrored images as if a butterfly from a chrysalis. The artist's reapers are sinister and humorous; their dark glasses situate them in the modern era. There are industrialized urban centers, bridges, and automobiles. Fans will be born of both Tennyson and Cote. Begin the enchantment early: introduce this volume to students, middle school and up.-Teresa Pfeifer, Alfred Zanetti Montessori Magnet School, Springfield, MA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Gr 7 Up The beauty and mystery of Tennyson's poem are reflected in the black-and-white, simple line and wash drawings of this master British illustrator. Through fluid, delicate line, readers see the causeway path to Shalott streaming with villagers and carters; passing knights; reapers in moonlit fields. Then the enigmatic lady is shown, as is her bolting outside after the dazzling Lancelot has passed in her mirror. The stormy skies at nightfall and the wind streaming her hair are wonderfully felt. The illustrations have a muted earthiness that helps place the pictured events in the realm of fancy; the unknowing Lancelot's few words of sympathy add the grace note to the close, where Keeping's cluster of knights' faces seem more human than traditionally heroic. The endpapers view the lady from above, lying in the boat as ``singing in her song she died.'' Several typos mar the text, but where a single illustrated poem can be used, this is a good if stark production. Ruth M. McConnell, San Antonio Public Library, Tex.
Kirkus Reviews
Cote's illustrations catch the haunting tone of Tennyson's Arthurian lyric, while adding several original touches. Weaving "a magic web of colours gay," the Lady lives in happy isolation in a tower until she catches a glimpse of Lancelot-activating a curse that sends her lifeless body drifting downriver to Camelot. In the sketchy, modernist art, medieval passersby mix with more contemporary ones on the road below Shalott, traveling toward Camelot's high-rise skyline by horse or automobile. And Lancelot cuts a stylish figure, wearing a long duster rather than armor, and goggles pushed up on a plumed hat. Cote also adds a brighter ending: After Lancelot's closing observation that, even in death, "she has a lovely face," a small figure rises on butterfly wings over the city. A classic poem, in an unconventional but sensitive and suitable setting. Includes long notes on poem and illustrator. (Poetry. 10-15)
Washington Post
Though the poem traditionally takes us on a woman’s tragic journey toward death, the artist sees it as a happy journey toward independence.
Booklist
Cote’s quiet line-and-watercolor and pastel artwork opens up the story, preserving the romance and mystery.
The Globe and Mail
[Limpid and lovely.
From the Publisher
Though the poem traditionally takes us on a woman’s tragic journey toward death, the artist sees it as a happy journey toward independence.

Fans will be born of both Tennyson and Cote.

Cote’s quiet line-and-watercolor and pastel artwork opens up the story, preserving the romance and mystery.

[Limpid and lovely.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554534579
  • Publisher: Kids Can Press, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/28/2009
  • Series: Visions in Poetry Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 1,483,105
  • Age range: 10 - 15 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Geneviève C?té is a Montreal artist whose illustrations have graced the pages of publications such as the New York Times and the Boston Globe. Her books have received three nominations for the Governor General's Award for Illustration, one of which went on to win, and she has also won the the Elisabeth Mrazik-Cleaver Award.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2012

    Is

    Is there a place called Shalott?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2011

    Read this one!

    Okay the text was just a lot of jibberish. But the pictures were reallly pretty.But if you look reallly closelt at the pictures you can make out the poem.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 4, 2011

    Gibberish version

    Gibberish version, worthless.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 29, 2011

    Corrupted

    Gibberish text.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 4, 2011

    Free but a waste of time

    Having read the poem before I can say I love it. However the rating is for this certain download. The text is all numbers and letters and its all gibberish.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 28, 2010

    free.....

    the translation is just random letters but the pictures are pretty

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2005

    wonderful

    This is my favorite poem! I have memorized it and can say that it is a work of art. If you like this poem I can also suggest 'A great and terrible beauty' and 'Anne of green gables'

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews

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