Lady of the Roses: A Novel of the Wars of the Roses

( 14 )

Overview

During her short time as a ward in Queen Marguerite's Lancastrian court, fifteen-year-old Isobel has had many suitors ask for her hand, but the spirited beauty is blind to all but Yorkist Sir John Neville. It is nothing short of a miracle when the Queen allows Isobel's marriage to the enemy, albeit at a hefty price.

All around Isobel and John rages a lawless war. It is only their passion that can see them through the bloody siege of London by the Duke of York, the violent ...

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Lady of the Roses: A Novel of the Wars of the Roses

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Overview

During her short time as a ward in Queen Marguerite's Lancastrian court, fifteen-year-old Isobel has had many suitors ask for her hand, but the spirited beauty is blind to all but Yorkist Sir John Neville. It is nothing short of a miracle when the Queen allows Isobel's marriage to the enemy, albeit at a hefty price.

All around Isobel and John rages a lawless war. It is only their passion that can see them through the bloody siege of London by the Duke of York, the violent madness of Queen Marguerite, and the devolution of Isobel's meek uncle into the Butcher of England. For theirs is an everlasting love that fears not the scratch of thorns, from either the Red Rose or the White.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780425219140
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/2/2008
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 1,012,022
  • Product dimensions: 5.55 (w) x 8.21 (h) x 0.91 (d)

Meet the Author

Sandra Worth has written three previous novels on the Wars of the Roses, for which she has received much acclaim.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 15 of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 21, 2013

    If there was a way to give a negative rating, I would have done

    If there was a way to give a negative rating, I would have done so.

    I found this book, whose subject matter had so much potential, frustrating from the beginning. The author, apparently, has no idea of the geographical layout of England.  A quick glance at a map would have showed, for example,  that Berkshire is west of London not north, that St. Albans to Bisham is a south westerly journey not a northern one and that, even today by car, Berkshire is no where near Yorkshire.  However, I was able to overlook these lapses and continue reading until, for reasons known only to herself, she began to change locations of historical people and dates of battles as well as giving the two main characters in her book (who should have been her Holy Grail) children they did not have and omitting ones they did.
    The end of this book for me was when she brought forward the date of the Battle of Towton by ten days.  There was no reason for this, it does not affect the storyline in the least though what it does do is prove that she neither researches nor cares about her subject matter or the brave men who both fought and died in this, the bloodiest battle ever fought on English soil.  This particular lack of due diligence is an insult to those who gave up their lives on that Easter Sunday almost 553 years ago

    John Neville, Lord Montague (and later Earl of Northumberland and Marquess Montague) was a courageous and bold battle commander, second only to his cousin Edward IV, at a time when England was in dire need of such men.  He, his immediate family and his Plantagenet cousins (with the exception of George, Duke of Clarence) were larger than life, proving time after time that they lived their lives and fought their battles with initiative, forethought and often audacious bravery.  Love them or hate them, anyone writing about them should treat them all with the respect that is, rightfully, their due.  

    If an author either does not wish to or have the time and inclination to perform all the required research necessary for historical novels (fiction based upon fact) then they should write about wholly fictional characters performing totally fictional escapades in an unspecified time .

    If you are interested in well researched and excellently written books about this era I highly recommend "The Sunne In Splendour" by Sharon Kay Penman or any of the Plantagenet books by Anne Easter Smith.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2008

    A reviewer

    'I went to bed early one night...tired and preoccupied with musings about love. then - was it a vision, a dream? - Love himself suddenly appeared before me, taking the heart from my breast and handing it to Desire...' An apt quote bespeaks the essence of a tale, in this case the story of the uniquely passionate, tender and forbearing love between Isobel Ingoldesthorpe and John Neville, the Yorkist. Their love endures through the thorny historical events of fifteen years commonly known as the War of the Roses. Sandra Worth has once again captured the tornado-whirling shifts of loyalty as England watches two mad women change the course of history, Marguerite d'Anjou - Henry VI's French queen - and later Elizabeth Woodville - Edward IV's beautiful wife. The former believes she is trying to bring peace to her simple, holy husband's land, the latter spouse flourishes by feeding years of imagined hurtful memories with unmitigated revenge. Their sheer, unadulterated terror will destroy England's aristocracy, including the famed kingmaker, Warwick, John Neville's brother. John himself will rise to the heights of power and lose almost all of it. Isobel is a feisty, intelligent and compassionate character whose observations have the same effect on the reader that she experiences. When one thinks that cruelty, savagery and insanity have reached their limit, another betrayal with its accompanying horrors or unexpected deaths arises to leave Isobel and all of England reeling with shock. When it seems that the common people are suffering the most from their leaders' cruelty and blood lust, it is Isobel who cares enough to help them survive and believe in something higher. Indeed Isobel will audaciously intervene in two hair-raising scenes to plead for mercy for two central characters. Isobel and John's intimate love is the glue holding together a world in which England's rulers precociously attempt to shape its history. Ms. Worth's singular talent lies in the masterful way she crafts plot and deftly presents an in depth, diverse set of historical characters whom the reader comes to deeply care about. Congratulations, Sandra Worth! Lady of the Roses is an unparalleled, beautiful, dire and memorable keeper in the top ranks of historical novels! What a treat! Reviewed by Viviane Crystal on January 23, 2008

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2008

    Get your tissue box ready...

    THE LADY OF ROSES is a true love story of the medieval ancestors of both Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Sir Winston Churchill. What makes the book even more fascinating this love story is based on actual facts. It centers around 15th-century England, on the brink of civil war. In the middle of this political turmoil, Isobel Ingoldesthorpe, a Lancastrian, and John Neville, a Yorkist fall in love and against all odds, marry. King Henry is mentally and physically ill. Queen Marguerite is left to rule, but the Yorkist are unsettled under her leadership.John Neville¿s brother is the Earl of Warwick is rich, powerful, and mistrusts the French queen. Warwick unseats Henry with Yorkist Edward of March. Not too long after Edward takes the crown, he marries Elizabeth Woodville in secret, against Warwick¿s wishes. Woodville demands land and titles for her relatives. She proves more vicious than the previous queen and war breaks out again. Throughout, John and Isobel strive for peace. This isn¿t possible as the War of the Roses rages around them. Sandra Worth threads together the most bittersweet love story since Romeo and Juliet. Her love for this time period shines through with her carefully sketched characters. Be sure to stay tuned to the next installment, The King¿s Daughter, a novel on the life of Elizabeth of York, mother of Henry VIII. After reading LADY OF THR ROSES, you won¿t want to miss it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2008

    This rose is wilted

    Ordinarily, I love historical novels, especially novels that emphasize the romance of the times. This is a novel that could have been wonderful. It begins with the spark of new love, but throughout the rest of the story, it is difficult to believe that they can maintain any passion for each other. Very disappointing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2008

    Simply Beautiful

    This is the best book I have ever read. It's a gorgeous love story of two of the most memorable historical figurs I've ever encountered, and the story is filled with momentous events. Isobel and John have stayed with me ever since I first read this book months ago. If you have only time for one book, make it Lady of the Roses.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2008

    shows the insanity of two queens

    History is never more alive than when explored through a fictional accounting. With extensive research and a passion for an era, an author can enlighten readers and pay homage to the past. Sandra Worth does so in her novel ¿Lady of the Roses.¿ This intense work of art brings life to English history during the times of the War of the Roses with as much rich vibrancy as the castle tapestries that are woven into the tale. A classic love story, and one that was likely the inspiration for many others that we know and cherish, Sir John Neville and Lady Isobel Ingoldesthorpe¿s tale is exquisitely bittersweet. At fifteen, Isobel was orphaned and became a ward of Queen Marguerite and King Henry VI. Her marriage would bring a decent price for the queen, but Isobel boldly requested that she be married for love instead. Such a thing was truly rare in the days of arranged marriages. Isobel was drawn by fate to meet John, and her heart would not be happy until they were wed. Favors do cost when bequeathed by royalty. During the struggle for marriage greater struggles were occupying the lands. Battles raged and many lives were lost. The red rose rivaled the white as brother fought brother, cousin slay cousin, and friends became foes. Treason was the common crime for those in dungeons and for those beheaded. How it came to be that Isobel and John were able to wed and live life through it all is a great tale. Titles changed with the blowing of the wind and the troubles this caused, and heartache it inspired are worthy of a modern day soap opera. With such changes the futures of the young heirs changed as well, with marriages being arranged at birth and carried out at even the age of eight. The king¿s throne being the highest in ruling the land, many questioned the sanity of a queen¿s influence. The lifetime of this novel shows the insanity of two queens who essentially ruled the throne and subsequently caused many deaths and sorrows. The years of 1456 through 1476 are played out in ¿Lady of the Roses¿ with the intensity of battle and the decadence of pure love. Sandra Worth has brought to life Sir John Neville, of whom no biography has yet to be found, but much is accounted to and admired for. Her research of his deeds and character are plain to be seen. Dear Isobel, our narrator, becomes a cherished companion to the reader. Seeing the times and strife through the eyes of first a young girl of fifteen and then as a young woman in love, and later as a mother and dedicated wife truly opens a window into the past. The writing is rich with precise details, lush scenery, and blunt bloodshed. Weaving in the authorship of the unparalleled tales of King Arthur and Sir Lancelot is a delightful inclusion. I look forward to further reading of this accomplished author.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A reviewer

    The rift between the Houses of Lancaster and York has led to civil war throughout England. With that backdrop, Lady in Waiting to Queen Marguerite Isobel Ingoldesthorpe and Lord John Neville fall in love. However, her liege is Lancaster while he and his powerful House support the York claim to the throne. Still after complex negotiations that anecdotally display how divided the country leadership is and an exorbitant bride price, John and Isobel marry. Their honeymoon is everything both wanted and more until affairs of state intercede. The Roses are preparing for war and though Isobel has some loyalty issues she believes she belongs at the side of her beloved John. As the hostilities between the Houses turn brutal with madness and butchery the norm, the couple is torn asunder, but their love remains stronger than ever keeping them together even in death especially with six surviving offspring. --- Known for her terrific in depth historical saga, The Roses of York (see CROWN FROM DESTINY, FALL FROM GRACE and LOVE AND WAR), Sandra Worth stays with the era providing a strong War of Roses tale. The story line is epic in scope using the fifteen years relationship between John and Isobel as a means to provide insight into England from 1456-1471. Historical fiction fans of this era will find LADY OF THE ROSES and the York trilogy worth reading. --- Harriet Klausner

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