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Lady Oracle
     

Lady Oracle

4.6 12
by Margaret Atwood
 

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Joan Foster is the bored wife of a myopic ban-the-bomber.  She takes off overnight as Canada's new superpoet, pens lurid gothics on the sly, attracts a blackmailing reporter, skids cheerfully in and out of menacing plots, hair-raising traps, and passionate trysts, and lands dead and well in Terremoto, Italy.  In this remarkable, poetic, and

Overview

Joan Foster is the bored wife of a myopic ban-the-bomber.  She takes off overnight as Canada's new superpoet, pens lurid gothics on the sly, attracts a blackmailing reporter, skids cheerfully in and out of menacing plots, hair-raising traps, and passionate trysts, and lands dead and well in Terremoto, Italy.  In this remarkable, poetic, and magical novel, Margaret Atwood proves yet again why she is considered to be one of the most important and accomplished writers of our time.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
If Atwood keeps a journal, perhaps some of the brief selections in this slender volume—postmodern fairy tales, caustic fables, inspired parodies, witty monologues—come from that source. The 35 entries offer a sometimes whimsical, sometimes sardonic view of the injustices of life and the battles of the sexes. Such updated fairy tales as ``The Little Red Hen Tells All'' (she's a victim of male chauvinism) and ``Making a Man'' (the Gingerbread man is the prototype) are seen with a cynical eye and told in pungent vernacular. ``Gertrude Talks Back'' is a monologue by Hamlet's mother, a randy woman ready for a roll in the hay, who is exasperated with her whiny, censorious teenage son. Several pieces feature women with diabolical intentions—witches, malevolent goddesses, etc. There are science fiction scenarios, anthropomorphic confessionals (``My Life as a Bat''), and an indictment of overly aggressive women that out-Weldons Fay Weldon. While each of these entries is clever and sharply honed, readers will enjoy dipping into them selectively; a sustained reading may call up an excess of bile. Atwood has provided striking black-and-white illustrations.
Library Journal
Gertrude hounding Hamlet? A bat critiquing Bram Stoker? There's even more in Atwood's witty new collection.
From the Publisher
"Read it for its gracefulness, for its good story, and for its help with your fantasy life." — The Globe and Mail

"Marvelously funny." — Maclean's

"A wonderfully unpretentious comic romp — a fine novel: inventive... funny, and a pleasure to read," — Mordecai Richler

"Brilliant and funny. I can't tell you how exhilarating it was to read it — everything works. An extraordinary book." — Joan Didion

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385491082
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/28/1998
Edition description:
1 ANCHOR
Pages:
352
Sales rank:
359,175
Product dimensions:
5.16(w) x 7.98(h) x 0.70(d)

What People are Saying About This

Joan Didion
Brilliant and funny. I can't tell you how exhilarating it was to read it—everything works. An extraordinary book.
—(Joan Didion)

Meet the Author

MARGARET ATWOOD is the author of more than twenty-five books, including fiction, poetry, and essays. Her most recent works include the bestselling novels Alias Grace and The Robber Bride and the collections Wilderness Tips and Good Bones and Simple Murders. She lives in Toronto.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Toronto, Ontario
Date of Birth:
November 18, 1939
Place of Birth:
Ottawa, Ontario
Education:
B.A., University of Toronto, 1961; M.A. Radcliffe, 1962; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1967
Website:
http://www.owtoad.com

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Lady Oracle 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
RebeccaScaglione More than 1 year ago
"I planned my death carefully. . ." Who would not be hooked on those first 5 words of the novel Lady Oracle by Margaret Atwood? Especially with the knowledge I have about a recent read (which I won't say because it will give away part of the book, but those of you who have also read it recently know what I'm talking about!!!!). Joan is a gothic romance author who has hidden her entire life from her true being. She was a very overweight child who never was happy and hid her true feelings from her friends. Joan hid her old self from her husband Arthur, as well as hiding the fact that she wrote these gothic romance novels. Joan has faked her death, and as you read Lady Oracle (named after a poem she wrote), you find out more about Joan's true self, and all of the lies she has told. I read Lady Oracle for my own altered version of Project Atwood, for my November read. Atwood did not disappoint. Once again, she wrote a fabulous novel, one I loved reading from start to finish. If you haven't read any Margaret Atwood novels, then I suggest starting with The Handmaid's Tale, which I recently realized is my favorite book. What is your favorite Margaret Atwood novel? Thanks for reading, Rebecca @ Love at First Book
Guest More than 1 year ago
Lady Oracle is not what I expected when I first read it, but it turned out to be really great. I couldn't put it down once I started reading it, and I've recommended it to all my friends. The twists and turns in this story and the story within is what kept me going. It's sad about the fat lady though.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Three shall go to the rising sun. On the horizen there is one. To reach their destination, hey shall meet devistation. answers they reach and prevail. Go to the doors of light and say "the gods are who we hail!"
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