×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Lady Susan
     

Lady Susan

3.8 9
by Jane Austen
 

See All Formats & Editions

Beautiful, flirtatious, and recently widowed, Lady Susan Vernon seeks an advantageous second marriage for herself, while attempting to push her daughter into a dismal match. A magnificently crafted novel of Regency manners and mores that will delight Austen enthusiasts with its wit and elegant expression.

Overview

Beautiful, flirtatious, and recently widowed, Lady Susan Vernon seeks an advantageous second marriage for herself, while attempting to push her daughter into a dismal match. A magnificently crafted novel of Regency manners and mores that will delight Austen enthusiasts with its wit and elegant expression.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"I wanted them all, even those I'd already read."
—Ron Rosenbaum, The New York Observer

"Small wonders."
Time Out London

"[F]irst-rate…astutely selected and attractively packaged…indisputably great works."
—Adam Begley, The New York Observer

"I’ve always been haunted by Bartleby, the proto-slacker. But it’s the handsomely minimalist cover of the Melville House edition that gets me here, one of many in the small publisher’s fine 'Art of the Novella' series."
The New Yorker

"The Art of the Novella series is sort of an anti-Kindle. What these singular, distinctive titles celebrate is book-ness. They're slim enough to be portable but showy enough to be conspicuously consumed—tiny little objects that demand to be loved for the commodities they are."
—KQED (NPR San Francisco)

"Some like it short, and if you're one of them, Melville House, an independent publisher based in Brooklyn, has a line of books for you... elegant-looking paperback editions ...a good read in a small package."
The Wall Street Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780486444079
Publisher:
Dover Publications
Publication date:
11/08/2005
Pages:
80
Sales rank:
485,915
Product dimensions:
5.30(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.30(d)

Meet the Author

Jane Austen (16 December 1775 - 18 July 1817) was an English novelist who is world renowned and is known primarily for her six major novels which interpret, critique and comment upon the life of the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Her most highly praised novel during her lifetime was Pride and Prejudice, her second published novel. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favorable social standing and economic security.

The author's major novels are rarely out of print today, although they were first published anonymously and brought her little fame and brief reviews during her lifetime. A significant transition in her posthumous reputation as an author occurred in 1869, fifty-two years after her death, when her nephew's publication of A Memoir of Jane Austen introduced her to a wider audience. Austen's most successful novel during her lifetime was Pride and Prejudice, which went through two editions at the time. Her third published novel was Mansfield Park, which (despite being largely overlooked by reviewers) was successful during her lifetime.

Between 1793 and 1795 Austen wrote Lady Susan, considered her most ambitious and sophisticated early novel.It is unlike Austen's other work; biographer Claire Tomalin describes the novella's heroine as a sexual predator who uses her intelligence and charm to manipulate, betray and abuse lovers, friends and family.

One of England's favorite and best authors, she is best known for her social commentary in novels.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 16, 1775
Date of Death:
July 18, 1817
Place of Birth:
Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England
Place of Death:
Winchester, Hampshire, England
Education:
Taught at home by her father

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Lady Susan 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
kcast610 More than 1 year ago
With a lovely sounding title as Lady Susan, who would suspect anyone more wretched a woman and mother as she. This is the first book I have ever read that consisted of a series of letters. I think the format work very well.
Anonymous 4 months ago
To some, Lady Susan's actions and self delusion may seem over the top. There is nothing redeemable about her. The trouble is that people like her do exist. Read contributions on forums for Narcissistic and Borderline Personality Disorders! The trouble is that unless you are one of the unfortunate individuals in their firing line, these people ensure the rest of the world thinks they are marvellous. Hats off to Jane Austen for identifying this type of behaviour at such a young age. And of understanding the personalities of the people surrounding them. Her decision to write her story as a series of letters was both brilliant and doomed to failure. The careful choosing of words and saying without saying worked really well at the start, but by midway through, the need for scenes with dialogue overrode a letter's capabilities. Had she returned to this project later in life, she may have worked a way around it, interspersing action with letters. But perhaps that would have negated what she was trying to do. Write the whole thing in the form of letters. She also possibly understood by then that characters like Lady Susan do exist, but they rarely become true heroes of a story because they never or rarely improve because they refuse to ever admit they are in the wrong. Modern psychology says the only way to deal with someone with NPD is to avoid them. From a distance, they (and Lady Susan) can be regarded with pity. It takes a special person to love them. So, while this story was never completed by the author, it remains as a true testament of her insight into people and their strengths and weaknesses.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While I would never claim that Lady Susan was among my favorites of Jane Austen's works, it was somewhat entertaining. The pains and scheming that Lady Susan went through to get her daughter married to James was interesting to watch. But it was indeed comical to see Lady Susan married to James and Fredrica married to Reginald, who was meant for Lady Susan.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago