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Lady Susan
     

Lady Susan

3.8 9
by Jane Austen
 

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Published in 1871, (long after Jane Austen’s death in 1817) and written in 1794, Lady Susan is told through letters, and is the story of a woman’s quest to find husbands for herself and her daughter, all while maintaining a relationship with a married man. The heroine is quite different than those from novels of the time, and is treated quite

Overview

Published in 1871, (long after Jane Austen’s death in 1817) and written in 1794, Lady Susan is told through letters, and is the story of a woman’s quest to find husbands for herself and her daughter, all while maintaining a relationship with a married man. The heroine is quite different than those from novels of the time, and is treated quite mildly for her adultery (which differs from the majority of Austen’s heroines). Lady Susan is also a dynamic character—attractive, witty and quite intelligent (if manipulative at times). As with most of Austen’s other work Lady Susan has been adapted for stage and screen on multiple occasions.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"I wanted them all, even those I'd already read."
—Ron Rosenbaum, The New York Observer

"Small wonders."
Time Out London

"[F]irst-rate…astutely selected and attractively packaged…indisputably great works."
—Adam Begley, The New York Observer

"I’ve always been haunted by Bartleby, the proto-slacker. But it’s the handsomely minimalist cover of the Melville House edition that gets me here, one of many in the small publisher’s fine 'Art of the Novella' series."
The New Yorker

"The Art of the Novella series is sort of an anti-Kindle. What these singular, distinctive titles celebrate is book-ness. They're slim enough to be portable but showy enough to be conspicuously consumed—tiny little objects that demand to be loved for the commodities they are."
—KQED (NPR San Francisco)

"Some like it short, and if you're one of them, Melville House, an independent publisher based in Brooklyn, has a line of books for you... elegant-looking paperback editions ...a good read in a small package."
The Wall Street Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781927002582
Publisher:
HarperCollins Canada
Publication date:
08/13/2013
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
115
Sales rank:
114,035
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

One of England’s most beloved authors, Jane Austen wrote such classic novels as Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, and Northanger Abbey. Published anonymously during her life, Austen’s work was renowned for its realism, humour, and commentary on English social rites and society at the time. Austen’s writing was supported by her family, particularly by her brother, Henry, and sister, Cassandra, who is believed to have destroyed, at Austen’s request, her personal correspondence after Austen’s death in 1817. Austen’s authorship was revealed by her nephew in A Memoir of Jane Austen, published in 1869, and the literary value of her work has since been recognized by scholars around the world.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 16, 1775
Date of Death:
July 18, 1817
Place of Birth:
Village of Steventon in Hampshire, England
Place of Death:
Winchester, Hampshire, England
Education:
Taught at home by her father

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Lady Susan 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
kcast610 More than 1 year ago
With a lovely sounding title as Lady Susan, who would suspect anyone more wretched a woman and mother as she. This is the first book I have ever read that consisted of a series of letters. I think the format work very well.
Anonymous 4 months ago
To some, Lady Susan's actions and self delusion may seem over the top. There is nothing redeemable about her. The trouble is that people like her do exist. Read contributions on forums for Narcissistic and Borderline Personality Disorders! The trouble is that unless you are one of the unfortunate individuals in their firing line, these people ensure the rest of the world thinks they are marvellous. Hats off to Jane Austen for identifying this type of behaviour at such a young age. And of understanding the personalities of the people surrounding them. Her decision to write her story as a series of letters was both brilliant and doomed to failure. The careful choosing of words and saying without saying worked really well at the start, but by midway through, the need for scenes with dialogue overrode a letter's capabilities. Had she returned to this project later in life, she may have worked a way around it, interspersing action with letters. But perhaps that would have negated what she was trying to do. Write the whole thing in the form of letters. She also possibly understood by then that characters like Lady Susan do exist, but they rarely become true heroes of a story because they never or rarely improve because they refuse to ever admit they are in the wrong. Modern psychology says the only way to deal with someone with NPD is to avoid them. From a distance, they (and Lady Susan) can be regarded with pity. It takes a special person to love them. So, while this story was never completed by the author, it remains as a true testament of her insight into people and their strengths and weaknesses.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
While I would never claim that Lady Susan was among my favorites of Jane Austen's works, it was somewhat entertaining. The pains and scheming that Lady Susan went through to get her daughter married to James was interesting to watch. But it was indeed comical to see Lady Susan married to James and Fredrica married to Reginald, who was meant for Lady Susan.
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