Lady Thief (Scarlet Series #2)

Lady Thief (Scarlet Series #2)

4.3 26
by A. C. Gaughen
     
 

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Scarlet's true identity has been revealed, but her future is uncertain. Her forced marriage to Lord Gisbourne threatens Robin and Scarlet's love, and as the royal court descends upon Nottingham for the appointment of a new Sheriff, the people of Nottingham hope that Prince John will appoint their beloved Robin Hood. But Prince John has different plans for

Overview

Scarlet's true identity has been revealed, but her future is uncertain. Her forced marriage to Lord Gisbourne threatens Robin and Scarlet's love, and as the royal court descends upon Nottingham for the appointment of a new Sheriff, the people of Nottingham hope that Prince John will appoint their beloved Robin Hood. But Prince John has different plans for Nottingham that revolve around a fateful secret from Scarlet's past even she isn't yet aware of. Forced to participate at court alongside her ruthless husband, Scarlet must bide her time and act the part of a noblewoman—a worthy sacrifice if it means helping Robin's cause and a chance at a future with the man she loves. With a fresh line of intrigue and as much passion as ever, the next chapter in Scarlet's tale will have readers talking once again.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“The second volume of the Scarlet series plunges readers happily into the world of Sherwood Forest and does not end with any resolution, but its spirited action and rich voices hold.” —Kirkus Reviews

“A must for secondary and public libraries that purchased the first book, this sequel will capture teen interest, and could also serve as a high-energy read-aloud . . . A welcome addition for libraries wishing to promote strong female protagonists.” —School Library Journal

“Gaughen prepares her readers well for volume two by filling in the backstory from the first entry and entices them to read the next entry with a cliff-hanging ending.” —VOYA

“There's plenty of action here, as well as romance, and it appears that there's even more to come.” —Booklist

“Debut novelist Gaughen does more than offer a rip-roaring tale, though it is that. The story, told in Scar's distinctive first-person voice, captivates and gets readers as deeply into the heart of a troubled girl . . . has plenty for both the romantic and the adventure lover.” —Booklist, starred review, on Scarlet

VOYA, February 2014 (Vol. 36, No. 6) - Beth E. Andersen
In this second of a projected four-part retelling of the Robin Hood legend, Scarlet—aka Lady Marian—continues her allegiance with Robin Hood and his Merry Men. The band now knows she is not Will Scarlet, a knife-wielding lad, but a fearless, rebellious, titled Lady, trapped for political purposes in a forced, unconsummated marriage with Lord Gisbourne. Scarlet is desperate to spare Robin’s life and to stem the misery of the starving poor of Nottinghamshire, trying to survive another brutal winter. As Scarlet makes obligatory appearances in the court (in between stealing for the poor), the powerful love between Robin and Scarlet grows white hot. They are determined to wait for the promised annulment from Gisbourne so that they can be properly married. Other forces are determined to get to Scarlet as her true parentage could pose a threat to the throne. This series is not for the faint of heart. Scarlet’s nickname (Scar) comes from a facial slash delivered by her husband. Robin, struggling with the affects of torture at the hands of Gisbourne, unwittingly lashes out at Scarlet in his sleep. Scarlet suffers a gut-churning injury in this volume. Gaughen brings to riveting life the harsh realities of the Middle Ages for the peasants; the life-and-death tournaments of sword fighting and archery; and the royal treachery that has the players jockeying for power and privilege. Gaughen prepares her readers well for volume two by filling in the backstory from the first entry and entices them to read the next entry with a cliff-hanging ending. Reviewer: Beth E. Andersen; Ages 12 to 18.
Kirkus Reviews
2013-11-13
In medias res, the second volume of the Scarlet series (Scarlet, 2013) plunges readers happily into the world of Sherwood Forest and does not end with any resolution, but its spirited action and rich voices hold. The main voice is that of Scarlet, thief and lady indeed. As Lady Marian, she has married Gisbourne to protect Robin Hood. Gisbourne has injured Scarlet and tortured Robin Hood, but he promises her an annulment (and no consummation) if she will just play a part while Gisbourne fawns upon Prince John. Scarlet sees all these wheels within wheels clearly as she tries to protect the people of Nottingham. She also needs to protect herself from Robin, whom she loves but who suffers from a kind of PTSD. There is a full measure of kisses and caresses (but no more than that) and some very lovely and slightly antique language--"She were as pretty as milk and sun"--as well as splendidly choreographed jousts and archery contests. There are also some brief but vivid scenes of physical cruelty. All this holds together as Scarlet discovers her true heritage and finds a supporter and protector in the ancient Eleanor of Aquitaine (mother of Prince John and Richard Lionheart). There are secrets and lies, and back story comes to the forefront enough so readers who might have missed the first volume won't be lost. The tale comes to a bitter stopping point that will leave readers very much in need of the next volume. (Historical fiction. 13-18)
Children's Literature - Zella Cunningham
The legend of Robin Hood continues in this sequel to the adventure novel, Scarlet. Marian is married to Guy of Gisbourne. To escape from her husband, Maid Marian poses as Will Scarlet, one of Robin Hood’s Merry Men. Rob, John, Much, and Scarlet work together to protect the people of Nottinghamshire from Prince John and Gisbourne. In the first book, Gisbourne marries Lady Marian of Leaford at the prompting of Prince John, thereby claiming her father’s lands, earning the title of Lord Leaford, and intending to become the next sheriff of Nottingham. Robin is back from the Crusades, suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder and from some unrevealed punishment from the former sheriff. Those plot details are must have been given in the previous book, as this volume only alludes to what has already occurred. Scar married Gisbourne to save Rob’s life, but then ran away after receiving a life-threatening injury from the sword of her husband. The marriage has not been consummated. Gisbourne lures Scar back to Nottinghamshire Castle by promising her an annulment if she will play the part of dutiful wife when Prince John comes to select the next Sheriff of Nottingham. But, of course, there are secrets to be uncovered and unexpected twists to the plot that make this an interesting sit-on-the-edge-of-the-chair type of read. The ending clearly is an indication that another book is due. A great story, a bit gory at times, but suitable for and appealing to the older reader. It is the second book in the “Scarlet” series. Reviewer: Zella Cunningham; Ages 12 up.
School Library Journal
03/01/2014
Gr 9 Up—Dreading what is in store for her but determined to rid herself of a vile husband, Lady Marian (aka Scarlet) agrees to return to the castle as Gisbourne's wife, in order to obtain an annulment and marry Robin Hood, her true love. Rob rightly fears for her life, but Scar is adamant that the end will justify the means. Finding life as a lady more than difficult, she defies Gisbourne's every request while continuing to aid the commoners. Her adventures as a "lady thief" are brought to a halt, however, when she learns that she is not the natural daughter of Lord and Lady Leaford but rather the out-of-wedlock child of King Richard the Lionheart himself. Consumed by jealousy from the news, Prince John, the monarch's incompetent brother, cuts off two of her fingers, has Gisbourne hanged, and then blames it on Scar. As with Scarlet (Walker, 2012), this sequel is filled with action, suspense, and a healthy dash of passionate but controlled romance. The story is well plotted and suitably paced with realistic, spot-on dialogue true to the characters and their status. Unusual vocabulary is clarified within the text, although some words are only explained pages after their initial use. There is some cursing, but it's not gratuitous. Primary and secondary characters are fully developed and carefully wrought details of castle life and the Crusades flesh out the historical context. A must for secondary and public libraries that purchased the first book, this sequel will capture teen interest, and could also serve as a high-energy read-aloud. It will prove a good companion piece to Howard Pyle's classic The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood and a welcome addition for libraries wishing to promote strong female protagonists.—Nancy Menaldi-Scanlan, formerly at LaSalle Academy, Providence, RI

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780802736147
Publisher:
Walker & Company
Publication date:
02/11/2014
Series:
A. C. Gaughen's Scarlet Series, #2
Pages:
320
Sales rank:
564,892
Product dimensions:
11.20(w) x 7.70(h) x 1.30(d)
Lexile:
HL720L (what's this?)
Age Range:
12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

A. C. Gaughen is the author of Scarlet. She serves as the Director of Girls' Leadership for Boston GLOW, a non-profit organization that creates opportunities to encourage and engage teen girls in the greater Boston area. She holds a masters degree in Creative Writing from St. Andrews University in Scotland and currently lives in Boston, Massachusetts, where she is pursuing her Masters in Education from Harvard University.

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Lady Thief 4.3 out of 5 based on 1 ratings. 26 reviews.
VeraciousRose More than 1 year ago
LADY THIEF is the stellar sequel to SCARLET, and A.C. Gaughen doesn't make life easy for our feisty protagonist, Rob or any of the Merry Men. Gisbourne proved himself a fearsome antagonist in SCARLET, and he's back with the insidious Prince John, who brings new meaning to the term "royal pain"! Fair warning - this is a hard story to put down once you start. Plan accordingly.
MissPrint More than 1 year ago
*Lady Thief is the second book in Gaughen's Scarlet trilogy and picks up shortly after the conclusion of the first book Scarlet. As such, this review has major spoilers for the first book.* Scarlet thought she escaped her past when she joined Robin Hood and his band to protect the people of Nottingham. That was before the thief taker Gisbourne arrived to capture Robin and his band. Before Scarlet was forced to marry Gisbourne in a gambit to save everyone she cares about. Now, Scarlet is irrevocably tied to Gisbourne even as she sits in hiding with Robin, John and Much. Rob's time in the Nottingham dungeon has left him scarred and broken. The entire band seems on the verge of collapse when Gisbourne returns with a shocking offer for Scarlet that has the potential to change everything. When Prince John and the royal court arrive in Nottingham for the appointment of a new Sheriff, Scarlet is drawn into a game of politics and secrets where losing could be deadly in Lady Thief (2014) by A. C. Gaughen. Lady Thief is the second book in Gaughen's Scarlet trilogy and picks up shortly after the conclusion of the first book Scarlet. While Scarlet is an excellent introduction to Nottingham and Gaughen's version of Robin Hood, Lady Thief moves the series in new directions as the story prepares for the conclusion of the trilogy. Lady Thief brings Scarlet back to the courtly life she abhors and offers quite a few surprises and promises of more to come before the trilogy concludes with Lion Heart. Lady Thief also introduces an especially frightening villain in Prince John. I won't get into details here because it's a spoiler, but some of what Prince John inflicts on Scarlet is so horrifying that I almost didn't finish this book. (A year ago, I would NOT have finished this book, if we're being honest.) It's fascinating to see more of court life and, horrible person that I am, I am quite fond of Gisbourne so I enjoyed seeing a slightly different side to him here. Lady Thief still has a lot of action as Rob and the band scramble to keep Prince John from appointing another horrible sheriff. Now that Rob and Scarlet have made their feelings about each other clear, readers also get a bit more romance along with the expected action and suspense. This book focuses more firmly on Scarlet and her character. Instead of just doing what she has to in order to survive, Scarlet is now forced to consider not just what she is willing to sacrifice but also what she is willing to become in order to protect Nottingham and those she loves. Lady Thief is a thrilling, fast-paced novel with a gut-wrenching ending that will leave readers anxious to get book three in their hands. Recommended for fans of Robin Hood and historical fiction with a twist. Not recommended for squeamish readers who prefer to avoid violence and gore. Possible Pairings: A School for Unusual Girls by Kathleen Baldwin, Fire by Kristin Cashore, Revolution by Jennifer Donnelly, A Spy in the House by Y. S. Lee, The Outlaws of Sherwood by Robin McKinley, Across a Star-Swept Sea by Diana Peterfreund, Song of the Sparrow by Lisa Ann Sandell, Rebel Mechanics by Shanna Swendson, Montmorency by Eleanor Updale, Illusions of Fate by Kiersten White
Andrea17 More than 1 year ago
While dealing with repercussions of Scarlet, namely Rob's night terrors, the band learns that Gisbourne is on his way back to Nottingham, along with Prince John and the royal court. Gisbourne, being the cunningly evil man that he his, offers Scarlet a deal. If she stays with him while Prince John is in Nottingham and act the part of a lady and dutiful wife he will give her an annulment. After much consideration, Scarlet accepts his terms and sets in motion events that will lead to the revelation of a secret not even she could have prepared herself for. We see a lot of our favorite characters that we met in Scarlet, along with a few new additions: Prince John, Princess Isabel, and (my favorite) Queen Eleanor. Yes, Eleanor of Aquitaine. I love what A.C. has done with these real life characters. She's turns Eleanor, an amazing woman of history, into an integral figure in Scarlet's life and brings her alive. Scarlet is still a strong figure, but what I also like about her is she comes off genuine. She breaks down throughout the novel, whether through fear or lack of hope, but pulls herself together to do what is right both for her and the people of Nottingham. She isn't a perpetually strong and holier than thou character, she has moments of weakness but also has moments of tremendous strength, all of which adds up to a rather relateable individual. And the romance! Ugh, I thought Scarlet gave me feels, but this . . . you guys. If you didn't ship Rob and Scarlet before you'll definitely join that bandwagon while reading Lady Thief. Such. Feels. These two genuinely care about one another and they're fighting for a chance to be truly happy. I cannot tell you how much I am rooting for these two crazy kids to find that happily ever after. Just one more book to go, kids! The language can be a bit tricky for some. Scarlet doesn't speak eloquently, but it's quick and easy to get used to. Within a chapter or two, you won't even realize the grammar mistakes and the words will just flow like normal. A.C. likes to kick us where it hurts - but it hurts so good! - so the ending is naturally a cliffhanger. And it's a biggie. A fact I both love and hate her for. Luckily, the paperback had a sneak peek of Lion Heart and I got a nice little fix before the long-long wait of its paperback release and I've been sated. For the time being anyway.
Addicted_Readers More than 1 year ago
4 Stars LADY THIEF was a thrilling follow-up to the Robin Hood retelling that swept us into a world of danger, mystery, political intrigue, an evil prince threatening to bring their kingdom and people to ruins, and heroic acts determined to bring Nottingham to it's rightful place of peace, security and prosperity!! LADY THIEF was filled with such shocking surprises for me. I mean, I was literally SHOCKED at the direction that it took. But nevertheless I LOVED the way it turned out. But honestly, I don't know why I didn't see it all coming, because once it was all laid out on the table, it all fit together like a jigsaw puzzle with all the right pieces. But one thing I was a little taken aback by was the drastic change in Scarlet's personality. Though at the same time, I knew she had to do and act the way she did in order to survive the situation that she found herself in. But what I didn't care for was Rob's situation with the disturbing dreams he was having. It was a little too much and it went a little overboard, and really felt meaningless. I would of liked to see Rob go through the motions of his pain and working through his demons, but just in a little less dramatic way. It just didn't fit well with his character and not the way you would think to see Rob acting, even if he was enduring something like that. It just felt out of the boundaries of his character traits, and by the end of the book it got to be a little annoying... THE PLOT Scarlet's world rages fire when her buried secrets are finally discovered and revealed to all of Nottingham. She's desperately tried for years to keep her true identify a secret from everyone, even the band of boys that have become her new-found family. For surly if they knew the real truth about who she really was, they would be as repulsed with her as she is with herself. Or would they...? Scarlet craves the freedom that comes with being just "Scar", and loathes the obligations that her birth given name holds. And she is determined to stay Scar and continue just being one of the boys in the band¿wrecking havoc on the guards and all who bring trouble to people of Nottingham. But when Lord Gisbourne, her long-lost fiancé now turned husband, tracks her down again after their last confrontation left their town sheriff dead, and their town in an uproar, she's positive she'll turn down his insane offer and stay with Rob, continuing the fight from the shadows. But when Gisbourne's offer becomes to good to be true, with hopes of a marriage annulment in exchange for the charade of her becoming his dutiful wife while prince John is in Nottingham selecting a new Sheff, she starts second guessing her decision to stay with Rob, and tempted to once again become the noble that she thought died the day she left her life behind... With hope dwindling by the day, and limited options of becoming free of her lunatic husband, and zero hope of electing Rob as the towns new sheriff, Scarlet see's no other choice but to concede and give into Gisbourne's sick desires to play his game of wifey. All while secretly trying to breakdown the nobles defenses from the inside to help their cause and find away to place Rob, her beloved as the towns new sheriff, and ultimately save their people from having to endure the wicked wrath of yet another evil sheriff out for his own viscous gain. So reluctantly, with a heavy heart and weary mind, she accepts his offer and is finally locked back into the world of nobility... But everything they've worked for starts to slowly unravel when prince John returns and brings his wicked wrath and vengeful heart to the town of Nottingham, and unleashes his hate and fury on the innocent people. And for the first time in a long time, Scarlet doubts herself and her capabilities in saving the people, including herself and her beloved Robin Hood. The full extent of their situation is looking more and more like their ultimate downfall if she doesn't find a way to stop Prince John before he finds a way to silents them all once and for all.... But Scar cannot be beaten down that easy, no, she's a fighter, and stronger then all that. Stronger then her evil husband and wicked prince that are slowly trying to tear them down from the inside out. But when hidden secrets from Scarlet's past that even she didn't know about come to light, they threaten to bring prince John's world crashing down around him, as anger, turmoil and jealousy consume him. And now Scarlet is finally starting to understand just why prince John is so threatened by her. And that she herself holds the future of Nottingham and their people in her hands. But is she really able to rise up from her downfalls and defeat this the ones wrecking havoc in Nottingham, and restore back the peace and freedom to her people that they so desperately need...? Phewww, that was such a blast reading this book, and I did really enjoy LADY THIEF a lot. And I can't wait to finish this trilogy and see how it all ties up in the end. And if Scar is finally able to overcome all her demons within and beat prince John and his evil villains once and for all. Overall, if you've read the first book SCARLET, then you should definitely enjoy this follow-up. It's full of shocking reveals, thrilling anticipation, heart-pounding action, and unforgettable love, with ultimate betrayals. I really, REALLY enjoyed this book, and I am so excited for the finale. Book three here I come...;)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Amazing sequel! Please give me more!
ETrupkiewicz More than 1 year ago
Ever imagined yourself a swashbuckling outlaw leaping through the forest, inches ahead of the greedy nobility from whom you've just stolen money enough to ensure that your people will withstand another tax season with their heads intact? No? Just me? Oh, well ... For those of you who nodded as you read that descriptor, never fear. There are a number of us, and I imagine one of them is probably author A. C. Gaughen, whose Scarlet trilogy is a tremendously well-written and engaging, and newly re-imagined rendition of the classic story of the hero and outlaw Robin Hood. The trilogy consists of SCARLET, LADY THIEF, and LION HEART, listed in correct reading order, and trust me when I tell you, you really need to read them in the right order. Otherwise, you'll be thoroughly confused, having been plunged into a melee of intricately crafted subplots peopled with characters compelling enough to walk right off the pages. My favorite character throughout the series is Scarlet, the title character of the first novel, and the point-of-view character through whose eyes readers experience the entire story line in all three books. She is as three-dimensional and realistic as can be, full of unique qualities, abilities, and contradictions --- like her gruff exterior versus her soft heart for the suffering --- that make her a sympathetic character from the first page. And anyone who appreciates the original Robin Hood tale will be relieved to know that Gaughen took great pains as she crafted each character, and that she included all the usual suspects, so to speak, from Little John to Friar Tuck, but with her own delightful twists in every individual instance. It's a delight and a pleasure to present this trilogy to my readers for their consideration, and I can't stress enough how highly I regard the trilogy and its author for its heart-warming, suspenseful, devastating impact. # # # Disclaimer: The opinions I have expressed are my own.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
To keep it short and sweet, this book is action-packed, fast-paced, full of cute, clean romance -no adult scenes- and I finished it in two days! Loved it and can't wait to read the next one!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting twist on the Robin Hood legend. Robin Hood is a little on the broody side but the other characters are less angst ridden. Looking forward to the next installment.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Beautifully done.
SleepDreamWrite More than 1 year ago
So I was going to read a chapter or two, then read the other books I was also reading. But then I found myself reading this more and more. And you know it, I loved this. This makes it, what, the second sequel I liked and love and found better than the first, even if I liked the first? Anyway, I liked the couple better here than in the first book. And of course this book had its fill of feels left and right. So basically, really good sequel and I like that the title for each book has something to do with the story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was super excited when I heard this book was coming out! And it did not disappoint! It may not have been quite as good as Scarlet, but it was still a great read! Definitely would recommend
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a serious rollercoaster, and I would be happy to ride again any day.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An excellent sequel to one of my favorite books. Beautiful, heartbreaking and exciting. Looking forward to the third book!
Kimmiepoppins More than 1 year ago
I LOVED THIS BOOK!!!! Dear A. C. Gaughen, The sheer awesomeness of this book is driving me crazy. Scarlet is a serious badass, but sweeter than ever at the exact same time. How did you manage to pull that off? And that thing you did with Gisbourne--too many feels for a character I dislike as much as him. He's such the perfect creeper. And about my favorite band of merry men. I still love them all *crushing hard* but how could you??? It was amazing it was awful. It was shocking--yes that's what it was--it was shocking!!!! So this leaves me with one BIG question--WHEN DO I GET TO READ SCARLET #3?????? Love, Me
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Alyssa75 More than 1 year ago
***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog*** Lady Thief by A.C. Gaughen Book Two of the Scarlet series Publisher: Walker Childrens Publication Date: February 11, 2014 Rating: 2 stars Source: eARC from NetGalley Summary (from Goodeads): Scarlet’s true identity has been revealed, but her future is uncertain. Her forced marriage to Lord Gisbourne threatens Robin and Scarlet’s love, and as the royal court descends upon Nottingham for the appointment of a new Sheriff, the people of Nottingham hope that Prince John will appoint their beloved Robin Hood. But Prince John has different plans for Nottingham that revolve around a fateful secret from Scarlet’s past even she isn’t yet aware of. Forced to participate at court alongside her ruthless husband, Scarlet must bide her time and act the part of a noblewoman—a worthy sacrifice if it means helping Robin’s cause and a chance at a future with the man she loves. With a fresh line of intrigue and as much passion as ever, the next chapter in Scarlet’s tale will have readers talking once again. What I Liked: I read Scarlet almost two years ago. It ended pretty well, and honestly, I didn't really think there would be a sequel or more books to the series. I mean, there was definitely room for more, but I was content with what I read. So, when I saw that there would be two more books, I was ECSTATIC! I couldn't believe it! More historical fiction novels with pretty covers - win! This book picks up where Scarlet left off, sort of. Rob is having awful nightmares from the awful physical and mental torture that occurred in book one. Scarlet is doing her best to avoid Gisbourne - which is no longer possible, because he offers her a deal: come live with him in the royal court when Prince John arrives, and when Prince John leaves, Gisbourne will annul the marriage between him and Scarlet. Nothing is easy for Scarlet or Rob in this book. Gaughen gives these two no breathing room, cuts them no slack, catches them no break. Or whatever. You get what I'm saying. It seems like Gaughen is torturing Scarlet sometimes. Scarlet goes back to Gisbourne, hoping for the annulment, but sometimes it seems like she won't survive. She gets badly injured by several members of the court, which is so not fair. I suppose it's good to show the injustice of the court and whatnot, but it was too much. I like how the romance in this book was clear-cut and separated. In Scarlet, there was a very obvious love triangle, and that was probably the only thing I didn't like about the book. In this book, roles and relationships are clear: Rob and Scarlet, John and Bess, prince and princess, Gisbourne and no one. Good. I'd say I enjoyed the ride, but that wasn't always the case. See below for more about this book, the things that I did not enjoy. Many things that I would usually feature in this section are among them. What I Did Not Like: The plot. The pacing. The romance. The characters. The ending. There were many things about this book with which I was not pleased. Maybe I expected too much from this book. Maybe it had been so long since I read Scarlet, and because of this, I might not have liked Scarlet as much as I thought I had. Who knows. My point is, the bad basically outweighed the good, for me. The plot was practically nonexistent. I mean, there was a plot, but I couldn't quite figure out what it was. Road to the annulment? Road to choosing a sheriff? I feel like the plot was all over the place, and therefore, it made the book lack a plot. And it dragged ON and ON. Most of it was Scarlet getting injured or purposely hurt by others. Sorry, but I don't really care to read that. Where is all the kickbutt action from book one?  So, the pacing was sort of just BAD. This book moved at a snail's pace. And it's a very short book, so it felt like not much happened, especially since the pacing was so slow. I feel like NOTHING happened (aside from Scarlet getting beat up by everyone). Things don't really start happening until the last 30%, and by then, I was like, REALLY. What happened to the other 70%?! The romance was significant in that I feel like every time Rob and Scarlet were together, they were kissing. And touching. And kissing some more. It felt SO FAKE. And OVERDONE. Like, I did NOT want to read about them kissing all the time, despite how much I love chemistry (and romance). Every time they had a conversation, it led to, we'll be together, and I love you, and, don't give up, and, insert mushy gushy blubbering here. NO. It did NOT work in Gaughen's favor, in this case. And the characters, ohhh, the characters. Rob feels so one-dimensional in this book. he doesn't seem to have any depth to him at all. Give him nightmares? Make him hurt people and feel guilty about it? Those things did NOT make him seem human, or like a real human. He was flat and unchanging and his only role seemed to be Scarlet's doormat. Like, let me bend over backwards and chop off all my limbs for you. Usually, I'd be like awww, that's true love right there, but in this case, if felt distant and fake. Rob seems like a robot, not a love interest. And shouldn't he be more than a love interest?! He's ROBIN HOOD. Who cares about Scarlet when history remembers Robin Hood? Ugh. And Scarlet herself pissed me off. She seems weak and insecure and did I mention weak? I know that physically, she is weakened. Not sure why Gaughen did that - I really don't see the purpose. Scarlet is already at a disadvantage at court - why inhibit her physically? I don't get it, but anyway. Scarlet seems so weak mentally. She lets everyone else fight her battles, and in the end, the annulment isn't won by HER. She's so stupid too - why would you trust Gisbourne to give you an annulment in the first place?! Why would he want that, when the marriage between him and Scarlet benefits him? Why not just live with Rob - in sin, if you please. If that's what you want, then do it. The ending was SUCH BULLS***. Pardon my language, except don't. What's the easiest way to get your characters out of trouble? Invent something about their birth! Better yet - magically make them have a high rank in society/the court! I won't say which character (or characters) experiences this fate, but Gaughen seriously took the easy way out. I could not help but roll my eyes and grit my teeth when I read about Eleanor and Scarlet. What. The. Heck. SUCH bulls***, if you ask me. Gaughen couldn't think of another way to patch that hole?! Unbelievable. I'm not sorry that I read this book. I was thrilled to be given the chance to review the sequel of a book that I loved. And I will read the third book. But this one was such a disappointment. Sequel slump ran rampant in this book. Would I Recommend It: Ehh. I'm not going to say no, because fans of Scarlet (like me) will want to read this one no matter what. To new readers: Scarlet was so amazing - it blew me away and reinforced my love of Robin Hood retellings. HOWEVER. Lady Thief, in my opinion, did not live up to the standards of Scarlet, fell short of my expectations, and was not nearly as good as I had expected. Rating: 1.5 stars -> rounded up to 2 stars. I didn't absolutely hate this book, but I certainly didn't love it. I am interested in reading the final novel in this series, for whatever reason. I need closure.