Lair of Dreams (Diviners Series #2)

Lair of Dreams (Diviners Series #2)

4.0 7
by Libba Bray
     
 

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The longing of dreams draws the dead, and this city holds many dreams.
After a supernatural showdown with a serial killer, Evie O'Neill has outed herself as a Diviner. With her uncanny ability to read people's secrets, she's become a media darling, and earned the title "America's Sweetheart Seer." Everyone's in love with the city's newest It

Overview

The longing of dreams draws the dead, and this city holds many dreams.
After a supernatural showdown with a serial killer, Evie O'Neill has outed herself as a Diviner. With her uncanny ability to read people's secrets, she's become a media darling, and earned the title "America's Sweetheart Seer." Everyone's in love with the city's newest It Girl...everyone except the other Diviners.
Piano-playing Henry Dubois and Chinatown resident Ling Chan are two Diviners struggling to keep their powers a secret--for they can walk in dreams. And while Evie is living the high life, victims of a mysterious sleeping sickness are turning up across New York City.

As Henry searches for a lost love and Ling strives to succeed in a world that shuns her, a malevolent force infects their dreams. And at the edges of it all lurks a man in a stovepipe hat who has plans that extend farther than anyone can guess....As the sickness spreads, can the Diviners descend into the dreamworld to save the city?
In this heart-stopping sequel to The Diviners, Printz Award-winning and New York Times bestselling author Libba Bray takes readers deeper into the mystical underbelly of New York City.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
★ 08/17/2015
Bray illuminates the dark side of the American Dream in her long-awaited sequel to The Diviners (2012), weaving xenophobia, industrial progress, Jazz Age debauchery, government secrets, religious fervor, and supernatural horror into a sprawling and always entertaining narrative. Romances among the major players get significant time in the spotlight: Evie O'Neill, now "America's Sweetheart Seer" of radio fame, finds herself pushed into a publicity-driven relationship with fellow Diviner Sam Lloyd; their combative (and often alcohol-fueled) exchanges are among the funniest in the novel. Follies girl Theta struggles to maintain her interracial romance with Harlem healer Memphis while keeping her own abilities secret from him. And musician Henry DuBois's efforts to locate the boy he left behind in New Orleans lead him into friendship with fellow "dreamwalker" Ling Chan, whose Chinese-American community is being vilified as a deadly sleeping sickness sweeps across New York City. Bray is equally at home constructing gruesome deaths at the hands of bloodthirsty ghosts and deploying incisive commentary on the march of progress, both of which inflict their share of damage. Ages 15–up. Agent: Barry Goldblatt, Barry Goldblatt Literary. (Aug.)
From the Publisher
* "Bray illuminates the dark side of the American Dream in her long-awaited sequel to The Diviners, weaving xenophobia, industrial progress, Jazz Age debauchery, government secrets, religious fervor, and supernatural horror into a sprawling and always entertaining narrative."—Publishers Weekly, starred review

* "A multilayered, character-driven, and richly rewarding installment to the paranormal historical fiction series."—School Library Journal, starred review

* "Bray weaves connections between her numerous characters and explores friendships, dark secrets, and dramatic love interests. This book will fly off the shelves to fans of Bray, Cassandra Clare, and the supernatural."—VOYA, starred review

* "The ambitiously broad focus of this novel strikes just the right balance in its division of narrative might, developing each of the dizzyingly large cast of diverse characters with an impressive attention to detail and with period-specific, witty dialogue."—Kirkus Reviews, starred review"

Sweet relationships (romantic, platonic, and familial) and snarky banter filled with period slang balance and accentuate the suspenseful horror. Fan will barrel through this second installment and emerge impatient for the next."—Horn Book

VOYA, August 2015 (Vol. 38, No. 3) - Deanne Boyer
Since Evie O’Neill revealed her powers as a Diviner, she has lived the high life as “America’s Sweetheart Seer.” As she drowns her nightmares about fighting John Hobbes in gin, dazzling parties, and the adoration of fans, a sleeping sickness is spreading through Chinatown and no one knows how to stop it. Dreamwalkers Ling Chan and Henry Dubois are thrown together when dreams start to collide. Henry is searching dreams for his lost love, and Ling is desperate for friendship in a world that can only see her as broken. Soon they discover that a malevolent force is at work in both the dream and real world. People are going missing, sleep is no longer safe, and a woman in a veil screaming “Murder!” haunts the edges of people’s dreams. It will take all the Diviners to solve this mystery and bring another harrowing adventure to a close. In the second book in The Diviners series, Bray tantalizes the reader, unraveling plot twists and secrets until the final hair-raising conclusion. As the plot develops, ties appear among John Hobbes, the sleeping sickness, and a darker problem, which promises to surface more in future books. The story is written in flowing phrases with detailed descriptions that add depth and clarity to both the book’s setting and characters. Bray weaves connections between her numerous characters and explores friendships, dark secrets, and dramatic love interests. This book will fly off the shelves to fans of Bray, Cassandra Clare, and the supernatural. (The Diviners, Book 2) Reviewer: Deanne Boyer; Ages 15 to 18.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316364881
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
08/25/2015
Series:
Diviners Series , #2
Sold by:
Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
608
Sales rank:
46,016
File size:
15 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
14 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Libba Bray is the author of the New York Times bestseller Beauty Queens, the 2010 Printz Award-winning Going Bovine, and the acclaimed Gemma Doyle trilogy. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Lair of Dreams 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Archaeolibrarian More than 1 year ago
This is an epic book that is based in 1920's New York, and everything you can associate with that - including flappers, parties and racism, to name but a few. A sleeping sickness is sweeping New York, starting off in Chinatown. It is up to Evie and a cast of characters to figure out what is happening and how to stop it. This is the second book in the series and as such I would recommend reading book 1, The Diviners. I haven't and will admit to feeling slightly lost when the characters would think about or discuss what had happened before. The characters are all well-established with their own quirks and foibles by the time this book starts, so it did take a while to actually feel like I knew these people. Personally, my favourite characters were Ling and Henry, and the friendship that developed between them. A dark, gothic and creepy book that may give you shivers, definitely recommended if you are on the lookout for something a bit different. * I received this book from NetGalley in return for a fair and honest review. * Merissa Archaeolibrarian - I Dig Good Books!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have been trying to write a review for LAIR OF DREAMS for over a month now, and the reason I keep failing at doing so is because there's just so much good stuff happening in the story that I could write a freaking essay about it. Libba Bray has a knack for blending compelling, diverse characters with living, breathing historical settings and creepy supernatural situations. Her version of 1920s New York City springs right off the page, alive with slang and pop culture and social movements. Although characters such as Evie and Sam live the high life as sensationalized mini-celebrities, Ling and Memphis are constant reminders of the ridiculous domestic policies and racism that thrived beneath the glitz and glamour of the flapper era. Bray splits her focus brilliantly between the more romanticized aspects of our country's past and the ugliness that we'd like very much to ignore. The poisonous, mystical dreamworld that provided much of the story's conflict served as a launching point for anti-immigrant sentiment because, of course, nobody suspected that its cause might be supernatural. The sleeping sickness spreading from the dreamworld preyed on hopeful people from all walks of life in search of progress, each of them eager to fulfill their American Dream. I loved how the primary villain in LAIR OF DREAMS wasn't necessarily a specific person as much as a feeling, of hope perverted by circumstances or politics or bad luck. That's not to say that the monsters weren't incredibly creepy, or that the agents carrying out their nefarious mission didn't raise the hairs on the back of my neck. Far more ominous, however, was the feeling that all the evil at play in LAIR OF DREAMS simply masked a larger issue, or a bigger power play by a villain who hasn't been fully destroyed. It's a testament to Libba Bray's skill and style that I never felt lost diving back into her world, or keeping the specifics of her various characters straight. I worried for Theta and Memphis, and crossed my fingers for Henry, hoping that he would find his lost love. I rolled my eyes over Evie, and laughed out loud at the way she and Sam played off each other for the public. My heart broke for Jericho and Mabel, and for Evie's Uncle Will, away on his own private mission. And as soon as I reached the last page, I wished for book three immediately.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Overall this was a good book. I feel a little like it was a filler book, so it was a little slow, but I still really enjoyed it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Can't wait for the next book!
RRatliff More than 1 year ago
I read tons of 1920s fiction. Lots of people do a good job writing realistic period fiction. But - NO ONE does it quite like Libba Bray. Everything about the way she writes captures the essence of the Golden Age of Jazz - the flapper slang, the clothes, the character dialogue, even some of the brands and products mentioned... Bray has the unique ability to fully immerse the reader. And, I love the story. This is an excellent follow-up to The Diviners. The writing style is consistent with The Diviners, with different parts written from different character perspectives, and their stories converging as the plot progresses. The mystery and evil of the dream world and the King of Crows is downright chilling. And, I love Sam and Evie in this book. There is definitely a Chicago Roxie Hart/Billy Flynn vibe to their banter. Theta is definitely Velma. I also have a huge appreciation for the length of story Bray writes. Neither of these books is short. Each one tells a complete story, but the overarching mystery carries across the series. And this is not a typical series where instead of writing two 500-page books they just broke it down into 3-4 books, leaving you feel like a couple more chapters will wrap things up. It is lengthy enough to make the reader feel they've gotten a full experience, and despite the length, it's never slow or boring. This is a well-plotted and expertly written series. And I truly hope there's more.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Autumn2 More than 1 year ago
I received this book via NetGalley to give an honest review. So I was very well debating on if I should give this book a 3 rating or 4, it isn't that I didn't like I sorta did but it didn't really call to me too much. Now when I requested this book on NetGalley the description is what called out to me though I didn't know the book was book two. I would honestly say you may want to read book one as you will get a backstory of the characters and powers. I think I would have done better with understanding everything if I had read book one. What I liked about the book was the dream walking I think that is the coolest thing ever to be able to do. Ling and Henry are able to go to sleep and walk around in their dreams which eventually leads them to solving what is causing a sickness dubbed the Chinese Sleeping Sickness. The setting of the book is in the 1920's which is a cool era and one I don't believe I read anything in that era before though some of the words were weird to be used such as instead of saying okay it was replaced with "jake" There is a mystery within the story not only with the sleeping sickness but also with Sam who is trying to figure out what happened to his mother and what is Project Buffalo. I see answers to Sam's questions being answered in a book three if the author continues. It seems all the characters are intertwined in some way or another. Such as Evie knows Jerico, Sam and Theta who is dating Memphis the poet, Theta is best friends with Henry who meets Ling but has a lover named Louis. They all intermingle and what they are seeing and going through come out in each chapter though you are far from confused as it all works out together. The way the dreamworld came together in the real world was a neat idea, who would have ever thought that you could get stuck in a dream and die? I bet not the folks that went to sleep dreaming happy thoughts. Why I gave this book a 3 rating it took forever for anything to come together for me. I kept telling myself things would get better at 30% then 40% and so forth and very soon it all came together the mystery in the sickness and how it was solved though it took a bit of time coming to it. It seems we spent a lot of time with Evie and her show and a bit of romance between characters. I enjoyed more of Henry and Ling's part in the story than the other characters. Henry has a great sense of humor and Ling is more a serious person but you can tell she is slowly starting to lighten up around Henry. I guess I was expecting a bit more of a fast pace story which that falls on me and not the author. If you enjoy fantasy and the era of the 1920's then I highly recommend this book to you.