The Lair of the White Worm

The Lair of the White Worm

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by Bram Stoker
     
 

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The Lair of the White Worm (also known as The Garden of Evil) is a horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker. It is partly based on the legend of the Lambton Worm. The book was published in 1911 by Rider and Son in the UK,[1] the year before Stoker's death, with colour illustrations by Pamela Colman Smith. In 1925, it was republished in a highly abridged and rewritten

Overview

The Lair of the White Worm (also known as The Garden of Evil) is a horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker. It is partly based on the legend of the Lambton Worm. The book was published in 1911 by Rider and Son in the UK,[1] the year before Stoker's death, with colour illustrations by Pamela Colman Smith. In 1925, it was republished in a highly abridged and rewritten form.[2] Over a hundred pages were removed, the rewritten book having only twenty-eight chapters instead of the original forty. The final eleven chapters were cut down to only five, leading some critics to complain that the ending was abrupt and inconsistent.[3] In 1988, it was very loosely adapted into a film by Ken Russell.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781535431521
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
07/22/2016
Pages:
92

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Abraham "Bram" Stoker (8 November 1847 - 20 April 1912) was an Irish author, best known today for his 1897 Gothic novel Dracula. During his lifetime, he was better known as the personal assistant of actor Henry Irving and business manager of the Lyceum Theatre in London, which Irving owned.
Stoker was born on 8 November 1847 at 15 Marino Crescent, Clontarf, on the northside of Dublin, Ireland.[1] His parents were Abraham Stoker (1799-1876) from Dublin and Charlotte Mathilda Blake Thornley (1818-1901), who was raised in County Sligo.[2] Stoker was the third of seven children, the eldest of whom was Sir Thornley Stoker, 1st Bt.[3] Abraham and Charlotte were members of the Church of Ireland Parish of Clontarf and attended the parish church with their children, who were baptised there.[4]

Stoker was bedridden with an unknown illness until he started school at the age of seven, when he made a complete recovery. Of this time, Stoker wrote, "I was naturally thoughtful, and the leisure of long illness gave opportunity for many thoughts which were fruitful according to their kind in later years." He was educated in a private school run by the Rev. William Woods.[5]

After his recovery, he grew up without further major health issues, even excelling as an athlete (he was named University Athlete) at Trinity College, Dublin, which he attended from 1864 to 1870. He graduated with honours as a B.A. in Mathematics. He was auditor of the College Historical Society ("the Hist") and president of the University Philosophical Society, where his first paper was on "Sensationalism in Fiction and Society".
After suffering a number of strokes, Stoker died at No. 26 St George's Square on 20 April 1912.[14] Some biographers attribute the cause of death to tertiary syphilis,[15] others to overwork.[16] He was cremated, and his ashes were placed in a display urn at Golders Green Crematorium. After the death of Stoker's son, Irving Noel Stoker, in 1961, Irving's ashes were added to that urn. The original plan had been to keep his parents' ashes together, but after Florence Stoker's death, her ashes were scattered at the Gardens of Rest. Visitors to Stoker's urn at Golders Green are escorted to the room as a precaution against vandalism.

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The Lair of the White Worm (Barnes & Noble Digital Library) 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous 10 months ago
CalypsoBella More than 1 year ago
Clearly+not+Stoker%27s+best+but+a+strange+and+fun+romp.+The+predjudices+of+his+time+period+in+regards+to+race+and+gender+are+quite+overt.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you're familiar with this work then it's probably 'cause of the great film it was made into by Ken Russell, and if you go to it looking for it being close to the movie, then you'd be let down. But it's a very weird novel, I've heard that Stoker was losing his mind as he was writing, and he died soon afterwards, I don't how accurate that is, Though false Or True it seems like a greatly advanced novel for 1911. maybe James Joyce would have liked it, It is cutely bizarre. I am impressed by Bram Stoker's depiction and description of manifesting evil. This is an important book to read if you've got literary aspirations.