Lalo: Symphonie Espagnole / Saint-Saens: Violin Concerto No. 3 / Ravel: Tzigane

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Andrew Farach-Colton
Those who view music as an entirely serious pursuit probably don't have much patience for unabashed showpieces like Lalo's Symphonie espagnole. But even the most high-minded music lovers might find themselves dazzled by Lalo's colorful score when it's played with such transcendent virtuosity as it is here by Maxim Vengerov. Vengerov digs into the solo part with abandon and the sparks fly. He's aided by Antonio Pappano, who gets similarly gutsy playing from the Philharmonia Orchestra. Of course, these French showpieces require elegance as well as daring, and Vengerov has that, too. His tone fairly glistens, and he can croon a melody as sweetly as the comeliest ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Andrew Farach-Colton
Those who view music as an entirely serious pursuit probably don't have much patience for unabashed showpieces like Lalo's Symphonie espagnole. But even the most high-minded music lovers might find themselves dazzled by Lalo's colorful score when it's played with such transcendent virtuosity as it is here by Maxim Vengerov. Vengerov digs into the solo part with abandon and the sparks fly. He's aided by Antonio Pappano, who gets similarly gutsy playing from the Philharmonia Orchestra. Of course, these French showpieces require elegance as well as daring, and Vengerov has that, too. His tone fairly glistens, and he can croon a melody as sweetly as the comeliest coloratura soprano. But what makes this disc such a joy, really, is that he obviously enjoys playing this repertory -- and his enthusiasm is contagious. Listen to the way he skips through the finale of the Saint-Saëns Third Concerto, for instance, or how he caresses the sensuous Gypsy-style melodies of Ravel's Tzigane. On his previous disc, featuring concertos by Britten and Walton, Vengerov demonstrated his ability to achieve serious sublimity. Here he achieves sublimity that, if not nearly as serious, is equally alluring.
Barnes & Noble - Andrew Farach-Colton
Those who view music as an entirely serious pursuit probably don't have much patience for unabashed showpieces like Lalo's Symphonie espagnole. But even the most high-minded music lovers might find themselves dazzled by Lalo's colorful score when it's played with the transcendent virtuosity of Maxim Vengerov. Vengerov digs into the solo part with abandon and the sparks fly. He's aided by Antonio Pappano, who gets similarly gutsy playing from the Philharmonia Orchestra. Of course, these French showpieces require elegance as well as daring, and Vengerov has that, too. His tone fairly glistens, and he can croon a melody as sweetly as the comeliest coloratura soprano. But what makes this disc such a delight, really, is that he obviously enjoys playing this repertory -- and his enthusiasm is contagious. Listen to the way he skips through the finale of the Saint-Saëns Third Concerto, for instance, or how he caresses the sensuous Gypsy-style melodies of Ravel's Tzigane. On his previous disc, featuring concertos by Britten and Walton, Vengerov demonstrated his ability to achieve serious sublimity. Here he achieves sublimity that, if not nearly as serious, is equally alluring.
Gramophone - Duncan Druce
Maxim Vengerov must be one of the most self-confident violinists around. He can perform the most taxing technical feats...with an exactness and brilliance that many other players can only dream about. He gives the impression that it's all quite easy.

Maxim Vengerov must be one of the most self-confident violinists around. He can perform the most taxing technical feats...with an exactness and brilliance that many other players can only dream about. He gives the impression that it's all quite easy.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 10/7/2003
  • Label: Emi Classics
  • UPC: 724355759320
  • Catalog Number: 57593

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1–5 Symphonie espagnole, for violin and orchestra in D minor, Op. 21 - Edouard Lalo & Antonio Pappano (34:39)
  2. 6–8 Violin Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op. 61 - Camille Saint-Saëns & Antonio Pappano (29:32)
  3. 7 Tzigane, rhapsodie de concert for violin & piano (or orchestra) - Maurice Ravel & Antonio Pappano (9:46)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Maxim Vengerov Primary Artist
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Dissapointing!

    I love Vengerov but I think that he completely butchers the Lalo! He starts out fine in the first movement with the solo violin but then comes in sharp on the high e at the end of the opening phrase. Then when he eventually lands on the low c sharp, he kind of bends the note like he is playing Ysaye or something. Then as he ends his passage, it sounds like he is trying to just cut the string in half! Of the many renditions that I have heard of this beautiful piece, this is one of the worst! However, Vengerov has many, many excellent recordings and I recommend many of them.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews