Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal

( 801 )

Overview

"The birth of Jesus has been well chronicled, as have his glorious teachings, acts, and divine sacrifice after his thirtieth birthday. But no one knows about the early life of the Son of God, the missing years - except Biff." "Ever since the day when he came upon six-year-old Joshua of Nazareth resurrecting lizards in the village square, Levi bar Alphaeus, called "Biff," had the distinction of being the Messiah's best bud. That's why the angel Raziel has resurrected Biff from the dust of Jerusalem and brought him to America to write a new gospel, ...
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Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal

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Overview

"The birth of Jesus has been well chronicled, as have his glorious teachings, acts, and divine sacrifice after his thirtieth birthday. But no one knows about the early life of the Son of God, the missing years - except Biff." "Ever since the day when he came upon six-year-old Joshua of Nazareth resurrecting lizards in the village square, Levi bar Alphaeus, called "Biff," had the distinction of being the Messiah's best bud. That's why the angel Raziel has resurrected Biff from the dust of Jerusalem and brought him to America to write a new gospel, one that tells the real, untold story. Meanwhile, Raziel will order pizza, watch the WWF on TV, and aspire to become Spider-Man." Verily, the story Biff has to tell is a miraculous one, filled with remarkable journeys, magic, healings, kung fu, corpse reanimations, demons, and hot babes - whose considerable charms fall to Biff to sample, since Josh is forbidden the pleasures of the flesh. (There are worse things than having a best friend who is chaste and a chick magnet!) And, of course, there is danger at every turn, since a young man struggling to understand his godhood, who is incapable of violence or telling anything less than the truth, is certain to piss some people off. Luckily, Biff is a whiz at lying and cheating - which helps get his divine pal and him out of more than one jam. And while Josh's great deeds and mission of peace will ultimately change the world, Biff is no slouch himself, blessing humanity with enduring contributions of his own, like sarcasm and cafe latte. Even the considerable wiles and devotion of the Savior's pal may not be enough to divert Joshua from his tragic destiny. But there's no one who loves Josh more - except maybe "Maggie," Mary of Magdala - and Biff isn't about to let his extraordinary pal suffer and ascend without a fight.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A childhood pal of the savior is brought back from the dead to fill in the missing 30-year "gap" in the Gospels in Moore's latest, an over-the-top festival of sophomoric humor that stretches a very thin though entertaining conceit far past the breaking point. The action starts in modern America, specifically in a room at the Hyatt in St. Louis, where the angel who shepherds "Levi who is called Biff" has to put Christ's outrageous sidekick under de facto house arrest to get him to complete his task. Moore (Bloodsucking Fiends) gets style points for his wild imagination as Biff recalls his journey with Jesus dubbed Joshua here according to the Greek translation into and out of the clutches of Balthasar, then into a Buddhist monastery in China and finally off to India, where they dabble in the spiritual and erotic aspects of Hinduism. The author gets more serious in his climax, offering a relatively straightforward, heartfelt account of the Passion and Christ's final days that includes an intriguing spin on how the Resurrection might have happened. The Buddhist and Hindu subplots seem designed to point out the absurdity and excesses of religious customs, but none of the characters are especially memorable, and eventually both plot and characters give way to Biff's nightclub patter. As imaginative as some of this material is, the sacrilegious aspects are far less offensive than Moore's inability to rein in his relentless desire to titillate, and his penchant for ribald, frat-boy humor becomes more annoying as the book progresses. Moore has tapped into organized religion for laughs before, but this isn't one of his better efforts. Agent, Nick Ellison. Author tour. (Mar.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-An angel has resurrected Levi bar Alpheus, known as Biff, to tell this story of his life with Joshua, better known to the modern world as Jesus Christ. As youths, they travel to the East in search of the wise men who gave gifts to Joshua at his birth, because the young man has a problem: he knows he's the Messiah, but he doesn't know what to do about it. Along the way, he and Biff come in contact with the spirituality of the East, along with a smattering of martial arts, strange poisons, abominable snowmen, and more. The story concludes with their return to Israel and Biff's own explanation of the events that make up the traditional gospel narrative. Readers who might be offended by the author's casual treatment of Christian themes may also take umbrage at his treatment of Judaism, Buddhism, Taoism, Hinduism, and much else. However, the author manages to share a variety of the world's spiritual insights while creating interesting and vivid characters. The style is smooth, drawing readers into the story seamlessly except for the need to laugh out loud every page or two. The humor is good-natured, despite the fact that Biff claims to be the inventor of a practice known as "sarcasm." In an excellent afterword, the author explains the choices he made in writing the novel, which will fascinate would-be writers, as well as provide a rebuttal for the book's likely critics.-Paul Brink, Fairfax County Public Library System, VA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
An audacious and irreverent novel about Jesus' childhood seen through the eyes of his best pal. Moore (Blood Sucking Fiends, 1995, etc.) has penned an amusing tale guaranteed deeply to offend all right-thinking Christians. The conceit is this: In 2001, Jesus decides that someone should write the missing gospel of his childhood, and he selects Levi-called Biff-the wisecracking companion and alter ego of his youth. Biff is resurrected and locked in a hotel suite in St. Louis with the angel Raziel, who is there to insure that he gets the writing job done. Raziel quickly becomes hooked on TV soaps, while Biff, grumbling, sets to work. Jesus' childhood, it turns out, was like that of most Jewish kids of his day (Moore offers much rich historical detail here), except he was the Messiah. This makes him sweet-natured and incapable of cruelty, lying, or sin, all of which puts him at a distinct disadvantage in a world that's violent and lustful. Enter Biff, the street-smart friend who protects Jesus from his own naivete, observes his early attempts at miracles (restoring lizards, etc.), helps him to understand sin (by fornicating with a harlot while explaining it to Jesus in the next stall), and much more. Mary Magdalene (Maggie) is on the scene, lusting after Jesus and lusted after by Biff. Though Jesus is pretty sure he is the Messiah, he is also, like any kid learning a trade, not sure what he should (and should not) do as Messiah. He sets out on a loopy and sometimes-hilarious quest to discover his destiny (and test his powers), while Biff, thoroughly cynical and amoral, accompanies him. The style is a bizarre mix of serious and sometimes brutal historical fiction laced with black humor,wordplay, in-jokes, and sharp one-liners worthy of a good stand-up comedian. Sometimes it all works well, and sometimes the jokes seem strained. Interesting, original, not for every taste.
St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“I haven’t finished reading [LAMB] yet, but I’ve managed to laugh myself to tears on more than one occasion.”
Rocky Mountain News
“An instant classic . . . terrific, funny and poignant.
East Bay Express
“[Moore’s] most ambitious book.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061438592
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/23/2007
  • Edition description: Special Gift Edition
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 143,288
  • Product dimensions: 6.12 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 1.33 (d)

Meet the Author

Christopher Moore

Christopher Moore is the author of thirteen previous novels, including Lamb, The Stupidest Angel, Fool, Sacré Bleu, and A Dirty Job. He lives in San Francisco, California.

Biography

A 100-year-old ex-seminarian and a demon set off together on a psychotic road trip...

Christ's wisecracking childhood pal is brought back from the dead to chronicle the Messiah's "missing years"...

A mild-mannered thrift shop owner takes a job harvesting souls for the Grim Reaper...

Whence come these wonderfully weird scenarios? From the fertile imagination of Christopher Moore, a cheerfully demented writer whose absurdist fiction has earned him comparisons to master satirists like Kurt Vonnegut, Terry Pratchett, and Douglas Adams.

Ever since his ingenious debut, 1992's Practical Demonkeeping, Moore has attracted an avid cult following. But, over the years, as his stories have become more multi-dimensional and his characters more morally complex, his fan base has expanded to include legions of enthusiastic general readers and appreciative critics.

Asked where his colorful characters come from, Moore points to his checkered job resume. Before becoming a writer, he worked at various times as a grocery clerk, an insurance broker, a waiter, a roofer, a photographer, and a DJ -- experiences he has mined for a veritable rogue's gallery of unforgettable fictional creations. Moreover, to the delight of hardcore fans, characters from one novel often resurface in another. For example, the lovesick teen vampires introduced in 1995's Bloodsucking Fiends are revived (literally) for the 2007 sequel You Suck -- which also incorporates plot points from 2006's A Dirty Job.

For a writer of satirical fantasy, Moore is a surprisingly scrupulous researcher. In pursuit of realistic details to ground his fiction, he has been known to immerse himself in marine biology, death rituals, Biblical scholarship, and Goth culture. He has been dubbed "the thinking man's Dave Barry" by none other than The Onion, a publication with a particular appreciation of smart humor.

As for story ideas, Moore elaborates on his website: "Usually [they come] from something I read. It could be a single sentence in a magazine article that kicks off a whole book. Ideas are cheap and easy. Telling a good story once you get an idea is hard." Perhaps. But, to judge from his continued presence on the bestseller lists, Chris Moore appears to have mastered the art.

Good To Know

In researching his wild tales, Moore has done everything from taking excursions to the South Pacific to diving with whales. So what is left for the author to tackle? He says he'd like to try riding an elephant.

One of the most memorably weird moments in Moore's body of work is no fictional invention. The scene in Bloodsucking Fiendswhere the late-night crew of a grocery store bowls with frozen turkeys is based on Moore's own experiences bowling with frozen turkeys while working the late shift at a grocery store.

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    1. Hometown:
      Hawaii and San Francisco, California
    1. Date of Birth:
      August 5, 1958
    2. Place of Birth:
      Toledo, Ohio

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

You think you know how this story is going to end, but you don't. Trust me, I was there. I know.

The first time I saw the man who would save the world he was sitting near the central well in Nazareth with a lizard hanging out of his mouth. Just the tail end and the hind legs were visible on the outside; the head and forelegs were halfway down the hatch. He was six, like me, and his beard had not come in fully, so he didn't look much like the pictures you've seen of him. His eyes were like dark honey, and they smiled at me out of a mop of blue-black curls that framed his face. There was a light older than Moses in those eyes.

"Unclean! Unclean!" I screamed, pointing at the boy, so my mother would see that I knew the law, but she ignored me, as did all the other mothers who were filling their jars at the well.

The boy took the lizard from his mouth and handed it to his younger brother, who sat beside him in the sand. The younger boy played with the lizard for a while, teasing it until it reared its little head as if to bite, then he picked up a rock and mashed the creature's head. Bewildered, he pushed the dead lizard around in the sand, and once assured that it wasn't going anywhere on its own, he picked it up and handed it back to his older brother.

Into his mouth went the lizard, and before I could accuse, out it came again, squirming and alive and ready to bite once again. He handed it back to his younger brother, who smote it mightily with the rock, starting or ending the whole process again.

I watched the lizard die threemore times before I said, "I want to do that too."

The Savior removed the lizard from his mouth and said, "Which part?"

by the way, his name was Joshua. Jesus is the Greek translation of the Hebrew Yeshua, which is Joshua. Christ is not a last name. It's the Greek for messiah, a Hebrew word meaning anointed. I have no idea what the "H" in Jesus H. Christ stood for. It's one of the things I should have asked him. Me? I am Levi who is called Biff. No middle initial. Joshua was my best friend.

The angel says I'm supposed to just sit down and write my story, forget about what I've seen in this world, but how am I to do that? In the last three days I have seen more people, more images, more wonders, than in all my thirty-three years of living, and the angel asks me to ignore them. Yes, I have been given the gift of tongues, so I see nothing without knowing the word for it, but what good does that do? Did it help in Jerusalem to know that it was a Mercedes that terrified me and sent me diving into a Dumpster? Moreover, after Raziel pulled me out and ripped my fingernails back as I struggled to stay hidden, did it help to know that it was a Boeing 747 that made me cower in a ball trying to rock away my own tears and shut out the noise and fire? Am I a little child, afraid of its own shadow, or did I spend twenty-seven years at the side of the Son of God?

On the hill where he pulled me from the dust, the angel said, "You will see many strange things. Do not be afraid. You have a holy mission and I will protect you."

Smug bastard. Had I known what he would do to me I would have hit him again. Even now he lies on the bed across the room, watching pictures move on a screen, eating the sticky sweet called Snickers, while I scratch out my tale on this soft-as-silk paper that reads Hyatt Regency, St. Louis at the top. Words, words, words, a million million words circle in my head like hawks, waiting to dive onto the page to rend and tear the only two words I want to write.

Why me?

There were fifteen of us — well, fourteen after I hung Judas — so why me? Joshua always told me not to be afraid, for he would always be with me. Where are you, my friend? Why have you forsaken me? You wouldn't be afraid here. The towers and machines and the shine and stink of this world would not daunt you. Come now, I'll order a pizza from room service. You would like pizza. The servant who brings it is named Jesus. And he's not even a Jew. You always liked irony. Come, Joshua, the angel says you are yet with us, you can hold him down while I pound him, then we will rejoice in pizza.

Raziel has been looking at my writing and is insisting that I stop whining and get on with the story. Easy for him to say, he didn't just spend the last two thousand years buried in the dirt. Nevertheless, he won't let me order pizza until I finish a section, so here goes...

I was born in Galilee, the town of Nazareth, in the time of Herod the Great. My father, Alphaeus, was a stonemason and my mother, Naomi, was plagued by demons, or at least that's what I told everyone. Joshua seemed to think she was just difficult. My proper name, Levi, comes from the brother of Moses, the progenitor of the tribe of priests; my nickname, Biff, comes from our slang word for a smack upside the head, something that my mother said I required at least daily from an early age.

I grew up under Roman rule, although I didn't see many Romans until I was...

Lamb. Copyright © by Christopher Moore. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Reading Group Guide

Introduction

We know all about Christ's birth, and even more about Christ's death. But until he really started getting the word of God out there, there's little recorded information about his life. What do we really know about the Messiah's formative years? Enter Christopher Moore's Biff, resurrected by the angel Raziel and held captive in a New York City hotel room until he records a new gospel.

Lamb is the story of Biff writing his and his buddy Jesus Christ's (aka Joshua's) story; it's the hilarious inside scoop on the could-be origins of hundreds of tales we recognize from the Bible and from popular culture. While negotiating the terrors, curiosities, and conveniences of modern life, Biff transcribes the untold story of his and Josh's youth. He describes the escapades of the Son of God -- from his time as a stone-cutter's apprentice in Nazareth to his journeys to modern-day Afghanistan, China, and India in search of the magi who attended his birth; to his return to his homeland to gather his disciples and fulfill his destiny. Underlying it all is the story of his unconsummated love for an incomprehensibly beautiful woman named Mary the Magdalene.

Biff reveals the human side of the Son of God, and paints a vivid historical picture of what life might really have been like in Christ's time. Plus, it's really funny.

Topics for Discussion

  1. Did you find Lamb to be fairly true to the Bible as you know it? Did you learn anything from Lamb? Do you find reading the Bible enjoyable?

  2. Early in the book, Biff writes about "little-boy love," describing it as " ... the cleanest pain I've ever known. Love without desire, orconditions, or limits -- a pure and radiant glow in the heart that could make me giddy and sad and glorious all at once." Do you understand what he's saying? Have you ever experienced that kind of love?

  3. Would Joshua have made it to maturity without Biff? Do you think Jesus had any human -- not divine help in becoming who he was? Is Moore making a statement about historical facts in the Bible, or about the value of friendship in general?

  4. Were you offended by this book in any way? There's so much here that Moore could almost be called an "equal opportunity offender." Did you find that some parts bothered you, while others didn't? Did he go too far, in any way? Not far enough?

  5. At one point, Biff asks, "Are all women stronger and better than me?" and Josh answers, "Yes." Do you think Moore believes this? Do you think Christianity teaches this? From what you know about other world religions, how does the role of women differ in each?

  6. Did you recognize any moments in your own development as you heard the story of Christ's? Do you relate to the character of Josh? Does this story of "Josh" make you feel any differently about Jesus as a human being?

About the author

Christopher Moore is the author of Fluke, Lamb, Practical Demonkeeping, Coyote Blue, Bloodsucking Fiends, Island of the Sequined Love Nun, and The Lust Lizard of Melancholy Cove.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 801 )
Rating Distribution

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(592)

4 Star

(137)

3 Star

(42)

2 Star

(9)

1 Star

(21)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 805 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 14, 2011

    Moore is my favorite author. I must be a sick puppy.

    Having read "Fluke" and "Lust Lizard," I was already a big Chris Moore fan. But as a Christian, I fully expected to be offended by this book. Didn't happen. Sure, there's some strange stuff here -- wouldn't be Moore if it wasn't . But in the end, he pretty much gets it right! I found myself at times wiping away the tears of laughter and thinking, "Ya know, it coulda happened just like that." Maybe. I teach Sunday School and Bible studies, and I believe every Christian with a sense of humor should read this book! Those of you who don't have a sense of humor should probably skip it.

    18 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 24, 2008

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    I Also Recommend:

    A hilarious look at the empty years of Jesus' life

    I thought this book was very funny. The hijinks that Biff and Josh get into is nothing short of fall on the floor laughing funny. The random humor interpieced with factual accounts of Jesus' travels makes the book completely worth the money. If you are looking for a book that will make you laugh, this is the one for you. Most people will appreciate the religous comedy if they have a sense of humor themselves. Not reccommended for the die-hard religous.

    12 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2012

    A Must-have Read for Those with True Senses of Humor

    This is one of my absolute favorite books. It is hilariously funny, respectful, and somewhat philosophical. Religiously, if you are ultra-conservative about your beliefs, this will not be your cup of tea. If you can see the absurdity in certain aspects of life, and have an open mind, you will love this book without a doubt!

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 15, 2009

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    Laugh Out Loud!!!

    This is a very charming book that made me laugh out loud so many times. I fell in love with Biff with his humor and loyalty. I did shed a tear at the end but I believe most people would. This book is not to be taken seriously but it does make you wonder how Jesus life was as a child growing up. Did he really put lizards in his mouth :)!?...I miss the characters and wish the book didn't end. It's an easy read and I promise you won't forget to recommend it to someome.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Completely Wonderful

    I loved this book so much that I purchased several copies as Christmas gifts last December. I don't think I've ever read a more endearing account of the young Jesus. Not only is it laugh-out-loud hilarious; it's also a sweet and, in it's odd way, a quite believable account if only in spirit and not substance. Biff's fierce devotion to Joshua and his complete derision for the angel Raziel makes for a completely new approach to a story we're all familiar with. I've heard some suggest this book is sacreligious but I think it's one of the most sweetly written and "Christian" stories I've ever come across.

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 6, 2008

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    It surprised me!

    I'd read Christopher Moore's "The Stupidest Angel" and "Fluke" before I found this book. I'll admit, I was very skeptical when I started it. I think I expected something a bit more blasphemous, but I was surprised. Moore does a great job of poking fun at one of the most important events in Christian faith without contradicting and insulting it....much. It's definately not a book I'd recommend to anyone unwilling to give him some creative license, because there are some portions that might bother those too sensitive about their faith (such as when Jesus's little brother keeps bashing a lizard with a rock just to watch him bring it back to life again). However, if you can accept it for what it is, you might love it! <BR/><BR/>Christopher Moore's books tend to be completely absurd on the outside, but under that you can find deep, meaning-of-life stuff too. I recommend it for anyone who likes something quirky, strange, and seriously funny!

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2012

    Hilarious!

    This is one of the best fictitious recountings of Jesus' early life. Lamb does an excellent job displaying the mystery of divinity and humanity. This is also one of the funniest novels I've ever read and re-read.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2013

    Fantastic

    The way Christopher Moore fills in the missing 30 years of Jesus's life is wonderful. He does it in such a way to shine light on Christ's humanity. He does this by showing that Christ isn't above hitting his friend for an off color comment, much like we would today. This book is a great read and I recommend it to everyone.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2012

    LAUGHED MYSELF TO TEARS!!!!!

    Maybe I should have been offended, but I was too busy laughing to think about it much. Christopher Moore is genious at taking this approach with Jesus' missing years. He still was the good guy in the end. By making Biff be the mischevious friend, Jesus gets let off the hook for experiencing these things with Biff. Placing Jesus in the middle of these kinds of situations and still having him come out being the man he was in the end was (an could probably only be) pulled off by Mr. Moore. I completely get it!

    I am completely sure that there will be many offended by this book. Please people, READ REVIEWS. I read through many for this book, and almost all said that if you are devout anything or easily offended by anything poking a little fun, this is not for you. Please heed this warning and if this is you, do not waste your time or money as you will be disappointed. This also has many situations that are completely inappropriate for the young.

    I loved this look at Jesus (and of course Biff). Please remember that this is a not so serious look at a very serious story, and remember that God did give us humor. Also remember that in the end, Mr. Moore got it right and maybe, just maybe gave us a different look at what made jesus the man he was.

    Thank you Christopher Moore for your wonderful imagination!!

    SPeeD

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 28, 2008

    Awesome

    This is one of the best books Ive read in a long time. Kept me laughing out loud!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 23, 2008

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    So now we know...

    I always wondered what Jesus was doing before he started his ministry. Now, thanks to his boyhood friend Biff, we finally know... <BR/>Christopher Moore is an extremely talented, slightly disturbed, very funny genius and I worship at his alter of bizarre.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2013

    Highly Recommended

    Classic Christopher Moore, funny and thought provoking at the same time.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 27, 2008

    more from this reviewer

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    The title alone sets you up for a good time!

    Sure the topic and handling may bring some criticism from the religiously serious, but screw them if they can't take a joke! Honestly Moore handles the subject matter and story very well; no preaching, no balking and while maybe not "PC", with considerable care and LOADS of humor. Biff, at the bequest of a terribly stupid angel, recounts his adventures with Josh (aka Jesus) through the tumultuous years the bible left out; Jesus the teenager! Biff is along for the ride and to keep Josh out of too much trouble as he tries to find his place and purpose as the son of God, a quest that takes him across continents and through many enlightening and hilarious encounters (my personal favorite is the one where they crash a devotional ritual to Kali in order to save the sacrificee's life). A hilarious and even thought-provoking must read.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2008

    Biff is one of the greatest characters ever written...

    This was one of the best-and funniest books I've ever read. I'm not a religious person by any means, but I do like to read the history on the subject. This was a great opportunity to see just what could've happened to Josh for the majority of his life. Moore gives him human characteristics, as opposed to just the devine. His best friend Biff is really hysterical-the kind of person we all need for a friend. I laughed so hard throughout the story. Just wonderfully hilarious!

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2006

    Not What I Thought it Would Be...

    When I first saw this book I thought 'Interesting, the childhood of Jesus. Something no other author has really touched on. Great idea'. And so I read it. Not only did this book turn out to be absolutely hilarious, but it had a good point. Some people think this is probably blasphemous and whatnot, but what I got out of this book is that Jesus was just like all of us. Christopher Moore makes Jesus human in this book, really human, He's not portrayed as that divine perfection crap that they always tell us in school. This is a book that makes you think, and any book that can do that alone is amazing.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 9, 2013

    This was truly one of the funnier books to ever cross my eyes. B

    This was truly one of the funnier books to ever cross my eyes. Biff and Josh make for a hilarious team traveling across Asia learning kung fu and yoga. I did not find it at all irreverent. It teaches the importance of being a good person while making the reader laugh.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 8, 2013

    I hurt myself laughing while Biff and Josh wrote The Sermon on t

    I hurt myself laughing while Biff and Josh wrote The Sermon on the Mount. They decided to leave a few people out, like the w@nkers and the dumbf*cks. That is just a touch of the funny found in this book. 

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2013

    Yeahhhh

    Probably going to hell for laughing while reading it, but to tell you the truth, it might be worth it. Moore is psychotic... I love him!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 13, 2013

    This book had some REALLY funny parts (like, laugh out loud no m

    This book had some REALLY funny parts (like, laugh out loud no matter where you are) but also some slower parts too.

    The idea that Jesus had a goofy best friend during childhood is fun and so as long as you remember that this is fiction I think everyone could enjoy it (Christian or not).

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 8, 2013

    VERY ENJOYABLE READ

    i REALLY ENJOYED THIS BOOK. THE HUMOR WAS GREAT AND A LOT OF THE CONTENT WAS REALLY UNEXPECTED. I ALSO FOUND THAT IT MADE SOME OF THE BIBLE STORIES MORE BELIEVABLE BUT AT THE SAME TIME REALLY MADE ME THINK AND UNDERSTAND MORE THAN BEFORE. IF YOU ARE A VERY RELIGIOUS PERSON OR AN AVID BIBLE SCHOLAR, THEN YOU WILL PROBABLY NOT GET PAST THE FIRST CHAPTER, WHICH WOULD BE A SHAME. YOU REALLY DO HAVE TO HAVE A SENSE OF HUMOR THOUGH AND NOT TAKE IT TO SERIOUSLY. IF YOU ENJOYED RICHARD BACH'S "iLLUSIONS" YOU WILL PROBABLY ENJOY THIS BOOK AS WELL

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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