The Lambs of London

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Charles and Mary Lamb, who will achieve lasting fame as the authors of Tales from Shakespeare for children, are still living at their parents' home. Charles, an aspiring writer bored stiff by his job as a clerk at the East India Company, enjoys a drink or three too many each night at the local pub. His sister, Mary, is trapped in domesticity, caring for her ailing, dotty father and her maddening mother. The siblings' enchantment with Shakespeare provides a much-needed escape, and they delight in reading and ...
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Overview

Charles and Mary Lamb, who will achieve lasting fame as the authors of Tales from Shakespeare for children, are still living at their parents' home. Charles, an aspiring writer bored stiff by his job as a clerk at the East India Company, enjoys a drink or three too many each night at the local pub. His sister, Mary, is trapped in domesticity, caring for her ailing, dotty father and her maddening mother. The siblings' enchantment with Shakespeare provides a much-needed escape, and they delight in reading and quoting the great bard. When William Ireland, an ambitious young antiquarian bookseller, comes into their lives claiming to possess a "lost" Shakespearean play, the Lambs can barely contain their excitement. As word of the amazing find spreads, scholars and actors alike beat a path to Ireland's door, and soon all of London is eagerly anticipating opening night of a star-studded production of the play.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Following up on his recent nonfiction Shakespeare: The Biography, Ackroyd brings readers forward to London at the turn of the 19th century, and to denizens who are preoccupied with the Shakespearean past. The plot is a lightly fictionalized story about real-life essayist Charles Lamb and his sister Mary, both passionate devot es of the Bard, and their fraught friendship with William Henry Ireland, a bookseller who unearths a trove of Shakespeare documents, including what seems to be an unknown play. The mystery of the play's origin shapes an enchanting, slightly melancholy, exploration of Regency society. The young characters struggle with the constraints of their day-the brilliant, fragile Mary feels suffocated by the strictures of feminine domesticity; William chafes against his father's domination-but they do so without craning their necks toward modernity as an escape route: Ackroyd knows that the past is another country; there his characters live, and there they stay. Steeping readers in revealing but unobtrusive period detail, Ackroyd once again delivers a psychologically rich evocation of a vanished time. (June 20) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
The Lambs of London, Charles and Mary, are featured players in the larger drama of William Ireland's story in this skillful reimagining of Ireland's purported discovery of a cache of heretofore unknown Shakespearean papers. While Charles works as a clerk for the East India Company by day and plays the bon vivant by night, his sister, Mary, recovered but scarred from a bout of smallpox, leads a reclusive life at home with an unloving mother and an increasingly senile father. Charles, who has begun to establish a literary reputation for himself, attracts the attention and admiration of the young Ireland, who ingratiates himself with Mary as a means of gaining favor with Charles, offering her a glimpse beyond her cloistered world and taking her around Shakespeare's Southwark haunts. The ale houses, antiquarian bookshops, and seedy south side of Shakespeare's London come to life in Ackroyd's richly atmospheric tale, which entertainingly mixes the bawdy with the brainy. For all libraries. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 2/1/06.]-Barbara Love, Kingston Frontenac P.L., Ont. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The prolific Ackroyd (J.M.W. Turner, 2006, etc.) returns to fiction in his ongoing examination of English cultural history, this time involving Charles and Mary Lamb, in the discovery of previously unknown Shakespearean manuscripts. In the mid-1890s, the Lamb siblings live unhappily with their nagging mother and senile father. Charles, a drudge at the East India House, dreams of literary fame and drinks too much. Mary feels trapped in domesticity; her only outlet is discussions about Shakespeare and other writers with her brother, who finds her intensity a bit overwhelming. Enter William Ireland, an ambitious teenager who works in the bookshop of his pompous, domineering father Samuel. When William courts the Lambs' and Samuel's favor with a series of documents supposedly in Shakespeare's hand-first a deed, then a poem, then a previously unknown play-it's evident to the reader that these are fakes. For one thing, the limping verse was obviously not penned by the Bard; for another, William is a historical figure, like the Lambs, who did in fact forge many Shakespearean manuscripts. But an "expert" declares them genuine, and at first, it seems that William will gain the renown he so desperately desires and one-up his father in their struggle for eminence beyond a life in trade. Ackroyd paints a marvelously atmospheric portrait of Victorian London, particularly in his vivid rendering of the Drury Lane premiere of Vortigern, the phony play. His narrative doesn't aim for suspense-it's clear that William will be found out-but rather for a slow unraveling of the young man's deception, paralleled by Mary's descent into a fit of madness that leads her to kill her mother. Because this material isso familiar to anyone with an interest in English culture, the novel has a slightly shopworn feel; you admire Ackroyd's skill and intelligence without being particularly engaged by his characters. Reasonable entertainment for serious Anglophiles.
From the Publisher
“A delicately cut historical novel about the Bard's greatest, boldest, maddest fans. . . oddly affecting and thoroughly entertaining.”—The Washington Post Book World“A delicious entertainment, faithful to its period, but done with the lightest of touches. . . Nobody knows this world better than Peter Ackroyd, and his latest foray into bygone London finds him at the top of his form.”—The Sunday Telegraph“Ingenious and mesmerizing. . . . A dazzling novel about false truths and real-seeming lies.”—The San Francisco Chronicle“Gothic and wry, with a sweet-and-sour mix of tragedy and comedy worthy of a Romantic-period Shakespeare forgery, The Lambs of London builds to . . . a moving crescendo.”—Newsday
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780099472094
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/26/2005
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 5.01 (w) x 7.75 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Peter Ackroyd (CBE) is a master of the historical novel: The Last Testament of Oscar Wilde won the Somerset Maugham Award; Hawksmoor was awarded both the Whitbread Novel of the Year and the Guardian Fiction Prize; and Chatterton was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. His most recent historical novels are The Clerkenwell Tales, The Trial of Elizabeth Cree, Milton in America, and The Plato Papers.
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Read an Excerpt

The Lambs of London


By Peter Ackroyd

Random House

Peter Ackroyd
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0099472090


Chapter One

Chapter One

'I loathe the stench of horses.' Mary Lamb walked over to the window, and touched very lightly the faded lace fringe of her dress. It was a dress of the former period that she wore unembarrassed, as if it were of no consequence how she chose to cover herself. 'The city is a great jakes.' There was no one in the drawing-room with her, so she put her face upwards, towards the sun. Her skin was marked by the scars of smallpox, suffered by her six years before; so she held her face to the light, and imagined it to be the pitted moon.

'I have found it, dear. It was hiding in All's Well.' Charles Lamb rushed into the room with a thin green volume in his hand.

She turned round, smiling. She did not resist her brother's enthusiasm; it cleared her head of the moon. 'And is it?'

'Is it what, dear?'

'All's well that ends well?'

'I very much hope so.' The top buttons of his linen shirt were undone, and his stock only loosely knotted. 'May I read it to you?' He dropped into an armchair, and swiftly crossed his legs. It was a rapid and economical movement, to which his sister had become accustomed. He held out the volume at arm's length, and recited a passage. ' "They say miracles are past; and we have our philosophical persons to make things supernatural and causeless seem modern and familiar. Hence is it that we make trifles of terrors, ensconcing ourselves into seeming knowledge when we should submit ourselves to an unknown fear." Lafew to Parolles. That is exactly the thought of Hobbes.'

Mary generally read what her brother read, but she did so more slowly. She was more thoroughly absorbed; she would sit by the window, where the light had touched her a few moments before, and contemplate the sensations that her reading had aroused in her. She felt then, as she had told her brother, part of the world's spirit. She read so that she might keep up these conversations with Charles which had become the great solace of her life. They talked on those evenings when he returned, sober, from the East India House. They confided in each other, seeing the same soul shining in each other's face.

'What was that phrase, "seeming knowledge"? You enunciate so well, Charles. I would be glad to have your gift.' She admired her brother precisely to the extent that she did not admire herself.

'Words, words, words.'

'But would that apply to the people whom we know?' she asked him.

'Would what, dear?'

'Seeming knowledge and unknown fear?'

'Elaborate.'

'I seem to know Pa, but should I submit to an unknown fear concerning him?'

Their parents, on this Sunday morning, were returning from the Dissenters' chapel on the corner of Lincoln's Inn Lane and Spanish Street. They were only a hundred yards from the house, and Mary watched as her mother and father crossed slowly from lane to lane. Mr Lamb was in the first stages of senile decay, but Mrs Lamb held him upright with her powerful right arm.

'And then there is Selwyn Onions,' Mary added. He was one of Charles's clerkly colleagues in Leadenhall Street. 'I seem to know his pranks and jokes, but should I submit to an unknown fear concerning his malevolent spirit?'

'Onions? He is a good enough fellow.'

'I dare say.'

'You look too deep, dear.'

It was a day in late autumn, and the brickwork of the houses opposite was stained red with the declining sun. The street itself was littered with orange peel, scraps of newspaper and fallen leaves. An old woman, draped in a voluminous shawl, was clutching the pump on the corner.
'What is "too deep?"' She was surprised by her brother's flippancy. It was insensitive, and she relied upon his sensitivity to give meaning to her life.

'There are some subjects, Mary, which have no depth. Onions is one of them.' He was annoyed by his disloyalty towards his friend, and quickly changed the subject. 'Why is Sunday so horrid? It is my day of rest, but it is so dry and desolate. It presses the life out of me. There is nowhere to think.' He jumped up from the chair, and stood next to his sister in the bay of the window. 'It only comes alive by twilight. But by then it is too late. Now I will go to my room and study Sterne.'

She was accustomed to this. 'Being left by Charles' was, as she put it to herself, a 'compound verb' signifying a coherent and complete sensation of loss, disappointment and anticipation. She did not feel abandoned, precisely. She was hardly ever alone in the house. And here they were. She heard her mother's key in the lock, and instinctively she held herself more upright; it was as if she were warding off danger. Mr Lamb was wiping his boots on the straw mat by the door while Mrs Lamb was asking their maid-servant, Tizzy, to clear up the leaves. Mary knew that Charles would be sinking deeper into his chair, shutting out the noises of the house with Sterne. She turned back to the window, as her parents entered the room, and prepared herself to become a daughter again.

'Sit with your poor father, Mary, while I prepare an eggnog. He may have caught cold.' He shook his head and laughed. 'What are you saying, Mr Lamb?' He looked down at her feet. 'You are quite right. I still have on my pattens. You miss nothing, I am sure.'

'Take them off,' he said. And then he laughed again.

Mary Lamb had watched her father's slow decline with interest. He had been a man of business, quick and efficient in all the dealings of the world. He had marshalled his affairs as if he were engaged in warfare with some invisible enemy and, when he returned each evening to the house in Laystall Street, he had an air of triumph. Then, one evening, he came home wide-eyed with terror. 'I don't know where I have been,' was all he said. Quietly he began to slip away. He had been Mary's father, then he became her friend and, finally, her child.

Charles Lamb seemed to pay no attention to his father's condition; he avoided him, whenever possible, and made no comment on his increasing incapacity. Whenever Mary raised the subject of 'Pa', he listened to her patiently but offered no comment. He could not speak of it.

Mr Lamb was rubbing his hands eagerly, in anticipation of the egg-nog.

When her mother had left the room, Mary sat down beside him on the faded green divan. 'Did you sing at the service, Pa?'

'The minister was mistaken.'

'On what matter?'

'There are no rabbits in Worcestershire.'

'Are there not?'
'No, nor muffins neither.'

Mrs Lamb professed to believe that there was some wisdom in her husband's ramblings, but Mary knew that there was none. Yet he interested her more now than he had ever done; she was intrigued by the strange and random phrases that issued from him. It was as if language was talking to itself.

'Are you cold, Pa?'

'Just an error in the accounts.'

'Do you suppose?'

'A red letter day.'

Mrs Lamb returned with the egg-nog in a bowl. 'Mary dear, you are keeping your father from the fire.' She was perpetually watchful, as if something in the world was forever trying to elude her. 'Where is your brother?'

'Reading.'

'That is a surprise. Drink it carefully, Mr Lamb. Mary, help your father.'

Mary did not like her mother very much. She was a prying and inquisitive woman, or so Mary thought; her mother's watchfulness seemed to her to be a form of hostility. It never occurred to Mary that it was a form of fear.

'Don't slurp, Mr Lamb. Your linen will be soiled.'

Mary gently took the bowl from him, and began to feed him with the porcelain spoon. She spent her life performing such tasks. Tizzy was too frail to deal with all the household cleaning and cooking, so Mary took on the most onerous duties. They could have afforded a young servant, at no more than ten shillings per week, but Mrs Lamb objected in principle to the introduction of another person who might shatter the carefully preserved composition, and the calm, of the Lamb family.

Mary accepted her role willingly enough. Charles went to the office, and she 'saw to' the house. That was how it would always be. After her sickness, in any case, she had become more subdued. The scars upon her face had made her an object of pity or distaste - or so she thought - and she had no wish to show herself.

She could hear Charles pacing the floor, in the room above. She had become accustomed to his footsteps and knew that he was preparing to write; he was placing his thoughts in order before he began. He was treading upon a narrow strip of carpet at the foot of his bed, and after three or four more 'turns' he would sit at his desk and begin. He had been introduced to the editor of Westminster Words, Matthew Law, who had been charmed by the young man's discourse on the acting style at the Old Drury Lane; he had commissioned from him an essay on the subject, and Charles had completed it only three days later. He had ended with a flourish, on the acting of Munden, when he had said that 'A tub of butter, contemplated by him, amounts to a Platonic idea. He understands a leg of mutton in its quiddity. He stands wondering, amid the common-place materials of life, like primeval man with the sun and stars about him.' This was considered to be a 'mighty flare', according to Matthew Law, and since then Charles had become a regular contributor to the weekly paper. At this moment he was writing an article in praise of chimney sweeps. He had been reading Sterne to discover whether his favourite novelist had ever entertained the topic.

Charles continued to earn his living as a clerk at the East India House, as his mother had insisted, but he wished to consider himself to be a writer. Ever since his school-days as a poor scholar at Christ's Hospital, all his hopes and ambitions had been directed towards literature. He would read his poems to Mary; and she would listen very carefully, almost solemnly. It was as if she had written them herself. He had written a drama in which he had played Darnley and she had played Mary Queen of Scots; she had been deeply excited by her role, and still remembered some of the lines she had spoken.

'Call your brother to dinner, Mary.'

'He is busy with his essay, Ma.'

'His essay will not be affected by pork chops, I dare say.'

Mr Lamb made a remark about red hair, which neither woman noticed.

Mary had gone to the door, but Charles was already halfway down the stairs.

'There is pork in the air, dear. The strong man may batten on him, and the weakling refuseth not his mild juices.'

'Francis Bacon?'

'No. Charles Lamb. A subtler dish. Buon giorno, Ma.'

Mrs Lamb was guiding her husband towards the small dining-room at the rear of the house; it overlooked a narrow strip of garden, at the bottom of which were a cast-iron pagoda and the remains of a bonfire of leaves. On the previous morning she and Mary had gathered up the leaves in armfuls, from the clipped grass and the slate path, before setting light to them; Mary had breathed in the scent as the sweet smoke rose towards the clouded London sky. It was as if she were performing a sacrifice - but to what strange god? Could it be the god of childhood?

Tizzy was putting a dish of sauce upon the table; she had a slight palsy, and spilled some upon the waxen polished surface. Charles licked his finger and scooped it up. 'A few breadcrumbs, mixed with liver and a dash of mild sage. It is bliss.'

'Nonsense, Charles.' Mrs Lamb was a member of the Holborn Fundamental Communion, and had firm ideas on the subject of bliss. Her somewhat dour piety, however, had no obvious effect upon her appetite. She intoned the grace, in which her children joined, and then served the chops.

'Why should the act of eating need a blessing?' Charles had once asked his sister. 'As distinct from silent gratitude? Why not a grace before setting out on a moonlight ramble? A grace before Spenser? A grace before a friendly meeting?' Ever since childhood Mary had disliked the ceremony of the family meal. The handling of the plates, the serving of the food, the chinking of the cutlery, induced in her a kind of weariness. On these occasions, only Charles could lift her spirits. 'I wonder,' he said now, 'who was the greatest fool who ever lived. Will Somers? Justice Shallow?'

'Really, Charles. You forget yourself.' Mrs Lamb was looking in the general direction of her husband, without seeming to single him out.

Mary laughed, and in the sudden movement a piece of potato lodged in her throat. She got up quickly, gasping for air; her mother rose from the table, but she waved her violently away. She did not want to be touched by her. She coughed the potato into her hand, and sighed.

'Who will buy my sweet oranges?' asked her father.

Mrs Lamb resumed her seat and continued eating her meal. 'You came home very late, Charles.'

'I was dining with friends, Ma.'

'Is that what you call it?'

Charles had come back to Laystall Street very drunk. Mary waited up for him, as always, and as soon as she heard him trying vainly to find the lock she opened the door and held him as he staggered forward. He drank too much on two or three evenings each week; he was 'sozzled', as he would put it apologetically the next day, but Mary never rebuked him. She believed that she understood the reasons for his drunkenness, and even sympathised with them. Had she the courage or the opportunity, she would be drunk every day of her life. To be buried alive - was that not motive enough to drink? Charles was in any case a writer, and writers were well known for their indulgence. What of Sterne or Smollett? Not that her brother was ever loud or belligerent; he was as mild and as amiable as ever, except that he could not stand or speak with any degree of precision. 'It is the cause, it is the cause,' he had said to Mary the previous night. 'Lead on.&

Continues...


Excerpted from The Lambs of London by Peter Ackroyd Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 12, 2011

    only okay

    a renowned historical novelist and biographer tells a good enough tale but. the characters are very frozen. i learnt not much about charles and mary lamb that i did not already know. i wanted more. more descriptions of the settings. more about the era. i hated the ending. i'll read his London and see if that will assuage my disappointment!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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